hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. You can also browse the collection for Festus or search for Festus in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
was disappointment. It was all beard, and no Dial. During the first year of the Dial's existence, it contained but little from the editor,--four short articles, the Essay on critics, Dialogue between poet and critic, The Allston exhibition, and Menzel's view of Goethe, --and two of what may be called fantasy-pieces, Leila, and The Magnolia of Lake Pontchartrain. The second volume was richer, containing four of her most elaborate critical articles,.-Goethe, Lives of the great Composers, Festus, and Bettine Brentano. Few American writers have ever published in one year so much of good criticism as is to be found in these four essays. She wrote also, during this period, the shorter critical notices, which were good, though unequal. She was one of the first to do hearty justice to Hawthorne, of whom she wrote, in 1840, No one of all our imaginative writers has indicated a genius at once so fine and so rich. Hawthorne was at that time scarcely known, and it is singular to read in