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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 12 (search)
was represented in all those volumes, it is interesting to revert to that comparison between Stedman and his friend Aldrich with which this paper began. Their literary lives led them apart; that of Aldrich tending always to condensation, that of Stedman to expansion. As a consequence, Aldrich seemed to grow younger and younger with years and Stedman older; his work being always valuable, but often too weighty, living in thoughts, not breaths, to adopt the delicate distinction from Bailey's Festus. There is a certain worth in all that Stedman wrote, be it longer or shorter, but it needs a good deal of literary power to retain the attention of readers so long as some of his chapters demand. Opening at random his Poets of America, one may find the author deep in a discussion of Lowell, for instance, and complaining of that poet's prose or verse. Not compactly moulded, Stedman says, even of much of Lowell's work. He had a way, moreover, of dropping like his own bobolink, of letting