hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 77 7 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 75 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Field or search for Field in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

ound net. There was a case before the U. S. Provisional Court. Judge Peabody, of some interest. Lucien Adams, shortly after the advent of Butler, was arrested and imprisoned in one of the forts, where be has been ever since. His counsel, Col. Field, had made repeated, but unavailing efforts for a trial or admission to bail. The only crime which the accused had committed was merely the avowal, before the occupation of the city by Yankee, of a preference for the Southern Confederacy. Subsciatively their white "brethren." The principal speakers were T. J. Durant and Col. Fields. The former is described as speaking passionately. When did we who know him ever see that cold, unsympathetic nature kindled to passion? The voracious Col. Field enlightened the meeting as to the cause of the war, and amused his intelligent audience by holding up to their ridicule those whom he honored by the title of the leaders of this rebellion. This is the same Col. Fields who a few months ago, whe