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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 37 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier. You can also browse the collection for James T. Fields or search for James T. Fields in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 7: Whittier as a social reformer (search)
it came from Huguenot or Norman veins, or from his Indian-fighting ancestors who deserted the meeting trail and camp. He had a good deal of the natural man left under his brown homespun, waistcoat, and straight collar. He had the reticence and presence of an Arab chief, with the eye of an eagle. Among all Howells's characters in fiction, the one who most caught Whittier's fancy was that indomitable old German, Linden, in the Hazard of New Fortunes, whom he characterised, in writing to Mrs. Fields, as that saint of the rather godless sect of dynamiters and atheists — a grand figure. Besides the general spirit of freedom which Whittier imbibed with his Quaker blood and training, he had also in his blood the instincts of labour, which tended to the elevation of the labouring class. This I know well, for I lent a hand, when living in the next town, to an agitation for the Ten Hour Bill at Amesbury, and there are various references to it in his brief letters to me. A natural polit
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 8: personal qualities (search)
and said, I've long wished to see you, Mr. Whittier, to ask what you thought of the subjective and the objective. Why, I thought the woman was crazy, and I said, I don't know anything about either of 'em. A young friend asked him one day if Mr. Fields's story were true about the woman who made her way to his library under pretence of conversing with him upon literary topics. Mr. Fields said her conversation became very personal and tender, and you remarked, I do not understand thee, I do noMr. Fields said her conversation became very personal and tender, and you remarked, I do not understand thee, I do not understand thee; thee had better leave the room. Was that really true, Mr. Whittier? asked the young girl. With a very funny twinkle in his eye, he replied, Does thee think, Mary, I could treat a lady in so ungentlemanly a manner as that? That was the only response Mary could elicit. Shy and self-withdrawing in conversation although Whittier might be, he was never caught at a disadvantage and was always ready with some pithy reply. If he had any one firm rule, it was to avoid making a
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 9: Whittier at home (search)
akers, if genuine, usually have rather a predilection for fighters. Garibaldi was one of Whittier's heroes, so was General Gordon, so was young Colonel Shaw; and so was John Bright, who fought with words only. Whittier wrote at his death to Mrs. Fields-- Spring is here to-day, worm, birdful. .... It seems strange that I am alive to welcome her when so many have passed away with the winter, and among them that stalwartest of Englishmen, John Bright, sleeping now in the daisied grounds of did not like the idea of fighting Satan with Satan's weapons. Lord Salisbury said truly that John Bright was the greatest orator England had produced, and his eloquence was only called out by what he regarded as the voice of God in his soul. Mrs. Fields's Whittier, pp. 50-51. It is an interesting fact that one of the best pictures ever drawn of Whittier in his home life is that drawn by Hayne, the Southern poet, who once visited him. So 'neath the Quaker poet's tranquil roof, From all dee
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 10: the religious side (search)
for two hundred years of silence have taken all the sing out of our people. Mrs. Fields's Whittier, p. 52. Yet the manner in which historic extremes have so ofty exhibited than in a fact in early Quaker tradition revealed by Whittier to Mrs. Fields. In speaking of Rossetti and his extraordinary medieval ballad of Sister He in a guarded way, but without any very positive interest. He wrote once to Mrs. Fields, in regard to a poem she had sent him :-- The poem is solemn and tender Lamb says, who stalk into futurity on stilts, without awe or self-distrust. Mrs. Fields's Whittier, p. 91. Judge Gate also writes me in regard to Whittier's supany particular tenet outside of the Friends. Ms. letter, Aug. 26, 1902. Mrs. Fields describes him at that summer watering-place, the Isles of Shoals, as being od by a severe headache, and he was hardly seen abroad again during his stay. Mrs. Fields's Whittier, pp. 75-77. The following letter to his friend Charlotte Fisk
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 11: early loves and love poetry (search)
w To right and left he lingered,-- As restlessly her tiny hands The blue-checked apron fingered. He saw her lift her eyes, he felt The soft hand's light caressing, And heard the tremble of her voice, As if a fault confessing. ‘ I'm sorry that I spelt the word; I hate to go above you: Because,’--the brown eyes lower fell- ‘Because, you see, I love you.’ Still memory to a gray-haired man That sweet child-face is showing. Dear girl! the grasses on her grave Have forty years been growing. Mrs. Fields's Whittier, p. 65. I withhold the closing verse with its moral; a thing always hard for Whittier to forego. The next example of Whittier's range of love poetry is to be found in that exquisite romance of New England life and landscape, known as My Playmate, of which Tennyson said justly to Mrs. Maria S. Porter, It is a perfect poem; in some of his descriptions of scenery and wild flowers, he would rank with Wordsworth. It interprets the associations around him and the dreams of t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 12: Whittier the poet (search)
f, like Burns, to more varied or at least to statelier measures. Burns was undoubtedly his literary master in verse and Milton in prose. He said of Burns to Mrs. Fields, He lives, next to Shakespeare, in the heart of humanity. Fields's Whittier, p. 51. His contentment in simple measures was undoubtedly a bequest from this poetMilton his long prose sentences and his tendency to the florid rather than the terse. His conversation was terse enough, but not his written style. He said to Mrs. Fields: Milton's prose has long been my favourite reading. My whole life has felt the influence of his writings. Fields's Whittier, p. 41. He once wrote to Fields thggestion and correction, while Whittier's poems come always with surprise, and even Mr. Pickard's careful labours add little to our knowledge. Mrs. Claflin and Mrs. Fields give us little as to the actual origins of his poems. I have never felt this deficiency more than in sitting in his house, once or twice, since his death, and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 13: closing years (search)
rise for forty years. I have lately felt great sympathy with--, Fields's Whittier, pp. 40, 59, 73. he said one morning, for I have been kept awake one hundred and twenty hours; an experience I should not care to try again. He said also to Mrs. Fields: I am forbidden to use my poor head, so I have to get along as I can without it. The Catholic St. Leon, thee knows, walked alert as usual after his head was cut off. I cannot think very well of my own things, he elsewhere said to her; and whato go to Quebec, but said, I know all about it, by books and pictures, as if I had seen it. Yet how much he enjoyed thus tasting in imagination the atmosphere and the life of a foreign land, is to be seen in a charming picture given by him to Mrs. Fields of a talk with a wandering Arab whom he once encountered. I was in my garden, he said, when I saw an Arab wander down the street, and by-and-by stop and lean against my gate. He held a small book in his hand, which he was reading fro
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
l Hall, Boston, 75. Farrar, Archdeacon, F. W., asks Whittier to write inscription for Milton Memorial Window, 181, 182; his letter to Whittier, 183. Federal Street, Boston, 60. Felice, Professor de, 167. Feuillevert family, 156. Fields, James T., 91, 102. Fields, Mrs. J. T., 86, 159, 174, 183; her Whittier, quoted, 65, 113, 117, 126-128, 140, 152, 172, 173, 175. Fisher, Mary, 84. Fletcher, J. C., 166, 167. Follymill, 141. Folsom, Abby, 81. Fox, George, 116, 124. France, 9Fields, Mrs. J. T., 86, 159, 174, 183; her Whittier, quoted, 65, 113, 117, 126-128, 140, 152, 172, 173, 175. Fisher, Mary, 84. Fletcher, J. C., 166, 167. Follymill, 141. Folsom, Abby, 81. Fox, George, 116, 124. France, 97. Freeman, the, mentioned, 115. Free Press, the, mentioned, 23, 25, 73. Free Soil party, 68. Friends' Review, mentioned, 121; quoted, 122-124. Friends, Society of, 2, 4, 10, 13, 17, 50, 51, 115, 116, 161, 162, 176; Whittier's relation to, 118-124. G. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, 112. Garrison, William Lloyd, 2, 18, 32, 34, 49-52, 57, 78, 81, 129, 135, 157; discovers Whittier, 21; his Life, quoted, 22-26, 49, 50, 61, 71; cited, 26 n.; mentioned, 67; visits Whittier, 24; Introducti