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The Daily Dispatch: April 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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The Daily Dispatch: January 13, 1865., [Electronic resource], The late operations at Wilmington — the official reports. (search)
y as men could do. Lieutenant Dornin was painfully wounded by the explosion of a shell. Very respectfully, &c., R. T. Chapman. Lieutenant commanding. Flag-Officer R. T. Pinkney, Commanding Naval Forces, &c. Headquarters, Wilmington, December 31, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonel A. Anderson, Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-General, Headquarters Department of North Carolina: Colonel: For the information of the general commanding, I forward the report of Colonel Lamb, commanding Fort Fisher in the action of the 24th and 25th: On receiving the information, at 1 P. M., on the 24th, that the fleet was moving in to take position, I at once ordered a steamer, and reporting to the headquarters, proceeded to the point of attack, reaching Confederate Point just before the close of the first day's bombardment, which lasted four hours and a half. That of the second day commenced at 10:20 A. M., and continued, with no intermission or apparent slackening, with great fury, from
ts garrison. "No further particulars at the time known. R. E. Lee." The fall of Fort Fisher, we presume, closes the port of Wilmington. It commands the main entrance to the Cape Fear river, and will, we fear, enable the enemy to blockade the river completely, giving them, as it does, a secure lodgment on the left bank. Fort Caswell and several other works still guard the southern channel of the river. Fort Fisher is thirty miles below Wilmington. Some regard the fall of Fisher as a disaster, while many are disposed to consider it a blessing in disguise. The latter, who are, it must be said, a numerous and sensible class, contend that Wilmington, as a seaport, has, from the beginning, done us more harm than good. They say that the goods imported through it have been of little value to us, while millions of dollars worth of our cotton has thence found its way into the hands of our enemies. It is proper to add, that possibly our force, which, according to Gene
owing it in the United States; too much at risk in Canada; too many merchantmen on the ocean, to permit, for a moment, the idea of hostilities with the United States, But how can the to the Cape Fear river, and will, we fear, enable the enemy to blockade the river completely, giving them, as it does, a secure lodgment on the left bank. Fort Caswell and several other works still guard the southern channel of the river. Fort Fisher is thirty miles below Wilmington. Some regard the fall of Fisher as a disaster, while many are disposed to consider it a blessing in disguise. The latter, who are, it must be said, a numerous and sensible class, contend that Wilmington, as a seaport, has, from the beginning, done us more harm than good. They say that the goods imported through it have been of little value to us, while millions of dollars worth of our cotton has thence found its way into the hands of our enemies. It is proper to add, that possibly our force, which, according to Gene
From Wilmington. --The Wilmington Journal of the 21st contains the following: "The Yankees appear to have left their base in front of Major-General Hoke's forces on yesterday, and concentrated at Fort Fisher. Their fleet has also disappeared. They, of course, hold Fisher.--Whether they have re-embarked their main body, we are unable to say. They occupy Smithville, it having been evacuated by our forces. "There was considerable skirmishing around Fort Anderson on Saturday evening and Sunday morning. It is supposed the enemy are anxious to silence Anderson, in order to open the way up the river for their gunboats. In this attempt we hope and believe they will meet with sad disappointment. All quiet below last evening at o'clock."
ent. A number more are expected, and we will, I hope, catch a portion of them. I entrusted this duty to Lieutenant Cushing, who performed it with his usual good luck and intelligence. These two are very fast vessels and valuable prizes. They threw a portion of their papers overboard immediately on finding they were trapped. I enclose a list of guns captured by the navy since the surrender of Fort Fisher, and the names of the different works. This number, added to those taken around Fisher, makes one hundred and sixty-eight guns in all, most of them heavy ones, that have been taken. I enclose a few papers that may be interesting. The Charlotte brings five English passengers, one of them an English army officer. They all came over, as they expressed it, "on a lark," and were making themselves quite "jolly" in the cabin over their champagne, felicitating themselves on their safe arrival.--The Stag received three shots in her as she ran by our blockading squadron. Very r
Shot by a Thief. --One night last week the premises of Mrs. Fisher, in Henrico county, were invaded by thieves, who stole from their pen several fine hogs. Before carrying them off, the head negro man on the farm was aroused by the squealing of the animals, when, thinking something was wrong, he started out to investigate the matter. Before reaching the pen, he was fired at by one of the robbers, the load striking him in the centre groin, inflicting a wound which it is thought will terminate in death. Hardly a night passes but the most daring robberies are perpetrated in the county, a few miles from the city, the most of which are believed to have been done by deserters, who skulk about the woods in the day time, and at night, armed with muskets, come from their hiding-places and depredate upon the citizens. So bold have these outlaws become that it is dangerous for persons to travel alone in the day time, and at night to turn out for the protection of property is almost
The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1865., [Electronic resource], Greeley makes a motion to admit the Southern members. (search)
meantime. She left Mr. Bowman's and came to a room over Mr. Barrett's tin store, on Franklin street. She sent for me, and I went to see her, and she said that Mr. Fisher had a little store down there which he would let her have if she could get some one to stand for her, and asked me to go up and see Fisher. I did so, and Mr. FFisher. I did so, and Mr. Fisher let her have the room. She opened a little business there, and I used to visit her. She proposed to me to come back and board with her again. I declined doing so, and she wanted to know the reason. I told her that I was addressing a young lady, and expected to be married at the close of the war or in the fall. I continueMr. Fisher let her have the room. She opened a little business there, and I used to visit her. She proposed to me to come back and board with her again. I declined doing so, and she wanted to know the reason. I told her that I was addressing a young lady, and expected to be married at the close of the war or in the fall. I continued to visit her. This was in the winter of 1864. On the Monday morning of the fall of Richmond I went to Lynchburg, and remained there some two weeks, when I came back to Manchester, where I was boarding. Arrived there on a Monday, and called on Mrs. Ould the next day. She asked me what I was going to do, and I told her I didn't
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1865., [Electronic resource], The Franklin street shooting affair — close of the investigation.--the accused sent on for examination. (search)
up the idea, and went to board with Mrs. Minter, on Third street, where I visited her. Afterwards she bought a place on Foushee street, and commenced keeping a boarding house. She sold out, and went to live with Mrs. Willett; continuing all the time to visit my house. Subsequent to this she went to board with Mrs. Miller, and went afterwards to live with Mrs. Baumann, on Twentieth street. Came back to Mrs. Miller's, where she was very ill. On her recovery she rented an establishment from Mr. Fisher, and set up a restaurant. Visited her there a great many times. This was in November; 1864. Saw Meade there frequently. Heard Mrs. Ould say in Meade's presence that they were to be married; were going to Alexandria, and that witness must come and see them. Mrs. Ould showed her a locket, that Meade had given her, with their likenesses in it. Up to last of April I had been at work for Mrs. Ould. She wanted witness to make her wedding clothes, but having a sick child, could not do it. Sh
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