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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 106 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 101 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 96 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 60 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 59 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 44 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for John B. Floyd or search for John B. Floyd in all documents.

Your search returned 48 results in 6 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
chief conspirators were President Buchanan's cabinet ministers and constitutional advisers. The three were Howell Cobb, of Georgia, Secretary of the Treasury; John B. Floyd, of Virginia, Secretary of War; and Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, Secretary of the Interior. William H. Trescot, of South Carolina, who for many years had betion of the office, and as you want Cobb's opinions, not mine, I send this to you. Yours, W. H. T. The original of the above letter is in my possession. Floyd's treachery consisted more in secret, efficient action than in open words. As we shall observe presently, he had used the power of his official station to strip te blackest crimes against the people of his country while-finding an asylum in Canada, and was finally charged with complicity in the murder of President Lincoln. Floyd, indicted for enormous frauds on the Government while in office, perished ignobly, after wearing the insignia of a brigadier-general among the insurgent enemies of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
oved from the command in Charleston Harbor, by Floyd, for attempting to increase his supply of ammu days after the issuance of the above order by Floyd, Jefferson Davis introduced January 9, 1860. Southern States. We are much obliged to Secretary Floyd for the foresight he has thus displayed, thout the least cause, to the influence of Governor Floyd. All my Cabinet must bear me witness thatenounced this exhibition of mob law bitterly. Floyd soon afterward fled to Virginia, and his succee fort, I suppose, President Buchanan and Secretary Floyd intend the Southern Confederation to be c did not coincide in his views. He then asked Floyd to procure for him an early interview with the of Scott, II. 614. The last sentence gave Floyd a new idea of a method to aid the conspiracy. on, said the Richmond Examiner, in a eulogy of Floyd, like all campaigns devised by him, was very aar Department, after the angry electrograph of Floyd, was from Joseph Holt, a loyal Kentuckian like[13 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
receive about one million of dollars a year. Floyd accepted from them drafts on his Department, iailey to exchange these bonds July, 1860. for Floyd's illegal acceptances. These were hypothecate his motive had been only to save the honor of Floyd, which was compromised by illegal advances. s hands. After consultation, it is said, with Floyd, he revealed the matter to the President, who e business of the Cabinet, for the public held Floyd and Thompson responsible for the crime which Boffice, complicity in the abstraction of John B. Floyd. the Indian Trust Fund, and conspiracy aga expression of an opinion, mildly drawn. that Floyd's conduct in the matter could not be reconcileury and the report of the Committee were made, Floyd was far beyond the reach of marshals and court Buchanan says that it was at his request that Floyd resigned. This allegation of the President, wpartment on the 8th, January, 1861. and, like Floyd, hastened to his own State to assist in the wo[7 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
be. Even in the loyal State of North Carolina, where there was no pretense of secession until four months later, May, 1861. the Governor, John W. Ellis, seized the forts within its borders, January 8. and the Arsenal at Fayetteville (into which Floyd had lately thrown seventeen thousand small arms, with accouterments and ammunition), under the pretext of securing them from occupation by mobs. He then wrote a letter to the President, telling him that if he (the Governor) could receive assuranurance, Toombs and others sent numerous sensation dispatches to Georgia. On the first of January, 1861. the day before the election was to be held, Toombs telegraphed to an Augusta journal, True Democrat. saying:--The Cabinet is broken up; Mr. Floyd, Secretary of War, and Mr. Thompson, Secretary of the Interior, having resigned. This was eight days before Thompson resigned. A coercive policy has been adopted by the Administration. Mr. Holt, of Kentucky, our bitter foe, has been made Se
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 11: the Montgomery Convention.--treason of General Twiggs.--Lincoln and Buchanan at the Capital. (search)
the San Antonio and San Diego mail-route, five hundred miles from the former city. It was then the Headquarters of the Eighth Regiment of Infantry, and, because of its situation in the midst of the country of the plundering Mescularo Apaches, and in the path of the marauding Comanches into Mexico, it was a post of great importance. By this act Twiggs deprived his Government of the most effective portion of its Regular Army, in strict accordance with the plans of his employers. Davis and Floyd. When the. Government was informed of his actual treason, an order was issued, March 1, 1861. directing him to be dismissed from the Army of the United States, for treachery to the flag of his country. The Charleston Courier, on the 18th of May, 1861, published a letter written by General Twiggs to President Buchanan, threatening to visit Lancaster, and call him to a personal account for branding him as a traitor. This was personal, he said, and I shall treat it as such — not through t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. (search)
halt until he reached Lewisburg, the capital of Greenbrier County. The news of Garnett's disaster, and Wise's own incompetence, had so dispirited his troops, that large numbers had left him. At Lewisburg, he was re-enforced and outranked by John B. Floyd, late Secretary of War, who had a brigadier's commission. The war in Western Virginia seemed to have ended with the dispersion of Garnett's forces, and there was much rejoicing over the result. It was premature. The Confederates were not disposed to surrender to their enemy the granaries that would be needed to supply the troops in Eastern Virginia, without a severer struggle. General Robert E. Lee succeeded Garnett, and more important men than Wise and Floyd took the places of these incompetents. Rosecrans succeeded McClellan, who was called to the command of the Army of the Potomac, July 22. and the war in the mountain region of Virginia was soon renewed, the most prominent events of which will be recorded hereafter. T