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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
ly over. I also commend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. A. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Ferguson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode rendered great service by their accurate and quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own was also shot; but through tSurgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own was also shot; but through the generosity of Private Jno. H. Owings, Company K, First Virginia cavalry, attached to my headquarters, was quickly replaced by his. The conduct of Couriers Owings, Lee, Nightengale, and Henry Shackelford, deserves the highest praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured 29 prisoners — a captain, 2 lieutenants, and 26 privates. My own loss was 11 killed, 88
over. I also recommend for their behavior, Captain Tebbs, of the Second, and Captain Litchfield and Lieutenant Dorsey, of the First; also Major W. D. Morgan, of the First. My personal staff, Major Mason, Captains Fergusson and Bowling, Dr. J. B. Fontaine, and Lieutenants Lee, Ryals, and Minnegerode, rendered great service by their accurate and a quick transmission of orders, and by their conduct under fire. Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own horse was also shot; but,Surgeon Fontaine's horse was killed under him, and my own horse was also shot; but, through the generosity of private John H. Owings, company K, First Virginia cavalry, at tached to my headquarters, was quickly replaced by his. The conduct of couriers Owings, Lee, Nightingale, and Henry Shackelferd, deserves the highest praise. The enemy's loss was heavy. Besides leaving a number of his dead and wounded on the field, he carried off a large number on horses and in ambulances. We captured twenty-nine prisoners — a captain, two lieutenants, and twenty-six privates. My own
by the bearer. Two hundred thousand caps have been sent. It will be continued as they arrive. Bragg is sending a division; when it comes I will move to you. Which do you think the best route? How and where is the enemy encamped? What is your force? (Signed) J. E. Johnston. The two hundred thousand caps mentioned in the above dispatch were captured by the enemy. I dispatched the following in reply: Your dispatch of twenty-fifth received this morning, with twenty thousand caps; Fontaine yesterday with eighteen thousand. No messenger from you since the eighteenth. I have eighteen thousand men to man the lines and river-front; no reserves. I do not think you should move with less than thirty or thirty-five thousand men, and then, if possible, towards Snyder's Mills, giving me notice of the time of your approach. The enemy encompasses my lines from right to left flank, occupying all roads. He has three corps: Sherman on my left; McPherson, centre; McClernand on my right;
The Daily Dispatch: August 12, 1862., [Electronic resource], Report of Gen. Stuart of his expedition in rear of the enemy's lines. (search)
of notice, as also his reference to the energy displayed by First Lieutenant James Breathed, of the Stuart horse artillery. I am most of all indebted to 1st Lieut. D. A. Timberlake, Corporal Turner Doswell, and private J. A. Timberlake, 4th Virginia cavalry, 2d Lieut. James R. Christian and Private R. E. Frayser, 3d Virginia cavalry, who were ever in advance, and without whose thorough knowledge of the country and valuable assistance rendered I could have effected nothing. Assistant Surgeon J. B. Fontaine, 4th Virginia cavalry, (the enemy giving him little to do in his profession,) was bold and indefatigable in reconnaissance, and was particularly active in his efforts to complete the brigade, Captain Heros Von Bercke, a Prussian cavalry officer, who lately ran the blockade, assigned me by the Honorable Secretary of War, joined in the charge of the first squadron in gallant style, and subsequently, by his energy, skill, and activity, won the praise and admiration of all.
ery of our little band, and the skill and efficiency of Gens. Stuart and Lee, has sent them back to tell of defeat rather than of success. Our loss will amount to nearly two hundred in killed, wounded, and prisoners, and this shows with what a determined spirit we fought. We lost no artillery or arms.--Taking all things into consideration, the render of this sketch may decide if our cavalry has done nobler work since the war. Below is a list of the Confederate less, furnished by Dr. J. B. Fontaine, Surgeon of Lee's cavalry brigade: Report of Casualties in Brig Gen. Fitz Lee's Cavalry Brigade in an Engagement with the Enemy near Kelley's Ford, in Culpeper county, Va. on the 17th day of March, 1863. First Regiment Virginia Cavalry--Co D — K lied: None. Wounded: D T Celly Missing: None — Co E — Killed: None. Wounded: C M Corne — Missing: None. Co F — Killed: None. Wounded: G F Andrews. Missing: None. Co G — Killed: None. Wounded: A B Chapman Missing: None.
l stores, together with three large field desks containing all the official papers at Gen. Custer's headquarters Gen. Fitz Lee participated in this battle, and deserves much praise for his gallantry. An incident that I must not fail to chronicle took place on the arrival of our cavalry at Hazel river. This stream was very much swollen by heavy ralus; several ambulances containing the wounded broke down in the river, and the drivers found it impossible to get them out without aid. Dr. J. B. Fontaine observing, the dilemma of the wounded dismounted and plunged into the stream up to his neck; he was soon followed by Gen. Stuart and others, and with great exertions they succeeded in getting all the wounded across safe. Gen. Stuart was in the river for an hour or more, and did not hesitate to put his shoulder to the wheel in getting his ambulances and artillery across the Hazel. Everything is quiet here at present. I am inclined to think that the fail campaign will soon close i