Your search returned 592 results in 257 document sections:

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
n. Huger's army was taken away, I thought the citizens would all turn out to man the batteries. To this he replied, they would starve us out. I informed him that they could not very well do that for some time to come, that we had four hundred barrels of pork, and four hundred barrels of beef stowed in the yard; that the forage there had been collected for three months for the cattle. To this he replied, that it had been determined upon as a military necessity, and must be carried out. Mr. Foote. What was the value of the navy-yard? What do you conjecture the amount of the injury to be which we suffered from the destruction of the navy-yard? Commodore Forrest. There is a printed schedule taken by a commissioner appointed by the Governour of the State of Virginia, which could be had from the Secretary of State of the Commonwealth. In that schedule it mentions the value of the public property to be $6,500,000, or thereabouts. But the evacuation was attended by an incident,
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Kossuth (1851). (search)
son, who died recently in Boston, in whatever company he went he nailed his flag high, that all men might know his principles. [Cheers.] Now, I say, that Louis Kossuth did not nail the flag of his principles high to the mast; if he had, Hangman Foote would never have invited him to Washington. The world-wide love of man, the burning enthusiasm, the hatred of all oppression, that gathered two hundred thousand living hearts in Hungary; melted them into one giant mass by the magnetism of his grtic; if it had, the pro-slavery divines of New York --the men who say they dare not utter even a prayer for the three millions of blacks-would never have gathered around it. He will go to Washington, and to whom? To Daniel Webster and to Hangman Foote. Had he been the Kossuth of Pesth,--the Kossuth whom Gorgei betrayed,--he would have gone to the prison of Drayton and Sayres to see the men who have been made a sacrifice for the crime of loving their brother-man as they loved themselves. He w
and wherever warmth is, there is life! . . . It is now for the first time that I breathe the air of a Southern State. But even as he spoke, the Rev. Calvin Fairbank was being doomed to the Feb. 21. Kentucky penitentiary under a sentence of fifteen years Lib. 22.47, 63, 66. hard labor, for having assisted in the escape of slaves— Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, p. 719. his second expiation in the same State for the same Christian act. At Jackson, Miss., Kossuth paid his respects to Hangman Foote, then Governor of the State, Mar. 25; Lib. 22.59. to whom, indeed, he owed the Congressional action which Pulszky's White, Red, and Black, 2.87, 90-92. ended in his release from Turkey and transportation to the United States. At Montgomery, Ala., the cradle of Lib. 22.65. the future Confederacy, he repeated his Covington Lib. 22.45. argument in favor of national interference on behalf of Hungary because the South held to the doctrine of State rights, identically his own! The Southern
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
for State lines, and expressing his fear that, in an emergency, its authority will be aided but little by the militia south of the Potomac; and that Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama will sooner or later unite and bid defiance to the North. He added: In the course of this year, 1833, I trust we are to see whether we are a nation or a confederacy. He had before this, Jan. 20, 1830, written to Mr. Webster, acknowledging the receipt of a copy of his speech on Foote's resolution, saying that the debate will be noticed in the history of our Union; and in that history you will appear as a man fulfilling the duty of your station, faithful to your country and to your own character. Sheriff Sumner was in favor of a strong government both for the nation and the State. He was greatly disturbed by the mobs which were frequent in American cities from 1834 to 1838, and which usually grew out of Slavery, religious antipathies, or criminal trials; and he insist
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
le to raise a new issue, and their organization rapidly went to pieces after 1852. In the meantime a change was taking place in the personnel of political leadership. Calhoun See Book II, Chap. XV. died before the compromise bill became a law, Clay Ibid. and Webster See Book II, Chap. XVI. in 1852. A number of men of less distinction but of invaluable service retired from politics about the same time: Van Buren in 1848, likewise Benton, Winthrop of Massachusetts, Ewing of Ohio, Foote of Mississippi, and Berrien of Georgia in 1851. With the death or retirement of these men the sentiment for union which they had fostered, declined. Among those who took their places partizanship was supreme, and until the advent of Lincoln originality and sincerity were almost totally lacking. It is not surprising, therefore, that for two decades after 1850 political thought and discussion centred around inherited issues relating to sectionalism and nationality. In the South the philo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
0, 282, 283-85, 287, 294 Fitch, Thomas, 428 FitzGerald, 488 Fitzhugh, George, 339, 340 Five years at Panama, 162 Flaubert, 105 Flaxius, 25 Flaxman, 460 Fletcher, Alice, 616, 617 n., 628, 629 Fletcher, John, 510 Fleurs d'amerique, 595 Fling out the banner, 500 Floe Ella, 512 Florida sketch Book, a, 165 Flournoy, 249 n. Follen, Karl, 451, 585, 586 Following the Equator, 12 Following the Guidon, 160 Fool's errand, a, 86 Fool's Prayer, the, 58 Foote, 337 Footing it in Franconia, 165 Footprints, 44 Forbes, James, 295 Force, Peter, 173, 175, 183 Ford, Paul Leicester, 91, 287 Forcellini, 461 Foregone conclusion, a, 79, 274 Foreign Conspiracies against the liberties of the United States, 345 Forms of water, 181 Forrest, Edwin, 268 Forrest, Thomas, 493 For the country, 50 Fortier, Alcee, 598 Fortnightly Review, 102 Fortune hunter, the, 294 Forty-five minutes from Broadway, 289 Forty Years among the Old
ship-worm soon disposed of them. All this must have been foreseen by so able an officer as Commander Davis, and it seems probable that the whole enterprise was mainly designed for intimidation. As flag-officer, Commander Davis succeeded Commodore Foote in command of the newly improvised flotilla on the Mississippi River, this consisting partly of army rams devised and commanded by Colonel Ellet, and placed under the temporary command of the flag-officer. Commodore Foote had relinquished coCommodore Foote had relinquished command, because of wounds, on May 9, 1861. The first naval engagement of the war, in the sense of a squadron fight, thus took place under a Massachusetts officer. It occurred before Fort Pillow, on May 10, and resulted in a partial victory for the Union flotilla, the Confederate rams having, however, done great damage, and the Union rams being not yet employed. Later, Fort Pillow was bombarded by Davis up to June 4, when it was abandoned, leaving forty heavy guns and much military material.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
n another letter he says:— The dinner at Webster's was very agreeable, quite agreeable; though having risen at three in the morning to prepare his great case in the Supreme Court, then having argued it, and, finally, having had a little discussion in the Senate as late as five o'clock, he grew tired about nine, and showed a great infection of sleep. But at the table he was in excellent condition. Again he writes:— The first half of the evening I spent with Clay, who had with him Foote and Clingman; and a curious conversation we had about slavery, I assure you. . . . . At last, however, mentioning the arrival of Mr. Prescott with a party of friends, he adds, They will stay till Friday, so as to dine at the President's on Thursday, for which we have invitations, but I would not stop here next week to dine with the Three Holy Kings of Cologne. The description, in the Life of Prescott, of the attentions showered upon his friend, might be applied with equal truth to the
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
Clay, Webster, Cass, Benton, Calhoun, Houston, Foote, Douglas, Jefferson Davis, Seward, Chase, Bell under consideration a resolution offered by Mr. Foote, of Tennessee, declaring against the defensi, as Mr. Jenkins, of Virginia, had asserted, Mr. Foote declared that he had high authority for sayie onward movement of the Confederate armies. Mr. Foote insisted that a vigorous onward movement immscussed at length with considerable spirit. Mr. Foote called attention to the doubts of its constimy all the militia away from State control. Mr. Foote's views were sustained by some others in Con further discussion. On an appeal to him by Mr. Foote not to make the call, Mr. Boteler declared this cause of internal trouble be removed. Mr. Foote sustained the member from Georgia in his mottions which had been previously presented by Mr. Foote. California this year was entirely in the comployment of substitutes, which was passed. Mr. Foote proposed resolutions requesting the Presiden[3 more...]
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
ome; I had no business here; but as the lawyer said, I had none anywhere else. May 28th.—Dupont is to be relieved, and three are spoken of in his place—Gregory, Foote, and myself. There is evidently an idea of two commanders, one for the fleet generally, and one for the attack, intended I think, to include Foote and myself (DahFoote and myself (Dahlgren's Memoirs, p. 390). Admiral Foote was taken suddenly ill, and that gallant officer died in New York on the 26th of June. Admiral Dahlgren was ordered to relieve Admiral Dupont, and left with the least possible delay; he arrived at Port Royal on the 4th of July. He says: General Gillmore wished to act, and had called Admiral Foote was taken suddenly ill, and that gallant officer died in New York on the 26th of June. Admiral Dahlgren was ordered to relieve Admiral Dupont, and left with the least possible delay; he arrived at Port Royal on the 4th of July. He says: General Gillmore wished to act, and had called for assistance. Dupont had no specific instructions, but would assist. He preferred to await my arrival. A very loose state of things; no shape or connection. After Rodgers got to the Wabash a note was sent me from Dupont, saying he was rejoiced and would send for me at 10.. Dupont was very pleasant. The cabins full of officer
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...