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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 32 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 3 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
Maryland, states that he was a prisoner of war for more than two years; that a private soldier killed in his presence an inoffensive prisoner in Carroll prison, who sat by the window, and was promoted from the ranks to corporal for the crime. Forney's Chronicle, in noticing the death, and apologizing for the crime, falsely stated that young Hardcastle, the prisoner killed, was cursing the guard. The room-mate of Hardcastle, who, like Hardcastle, had been arrested upon no charges whatever,e testimony before the Judiciary Committee of the House, all of it bearing directly, if not conclusively, on a certain intention to take the life of Mr. Lincoln, is a most important element in the case. This was reported as from the pen of Mr. John W. Forney, then clerk of the Senate, and is cited by me as an expression of a general tone of the press on that occasion. Then, the House of Representatives, on the motion of Mr. Boutwell, of Massachusetts, the following day passed a resolution that
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
agnificently dressed and crowned with that beautiful head of hair for which she was so generally admired. The whole Diplomatic Corps, the judges of the Supreme Court, members of the Senate, the House, and many other official dignitaries were in attendance on this rare occasion. The press was represented by Horace Greeley, David A. Wells, Horace White, Samuel Bowles, Charles Nordhoff of the Herald, Sands, Minturn, Marshalls, Halstead, Samuel Read, Gobright, Benjamin Perley Poore, and John W. Forney. The usual number of senators and representatives were in attendance, also a large contingent of the army and navy. A few evenings later Hon. Zachary Chandler, of Michigan, who occupied one of the most beautiful homes in Washington, on H Street between Fourteenth and Fifteenth, gave a very large reception to the commission, many of the persons above enumerated being among the guests who were glad to honor our British friends. Members of the cabinet also gave dinners and receptions
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 11: (search)
the Russian minister, with her great beauty heightened by her wealth of golden hair, who created such a sensation by her magnificent dress and diamonds, represented the Diplomatic Corps. The ladies of the cabinet who were not assisting in the reception accompanied their husbands and sustained themselves admirably as representative American women. In the throng there were such distinguished persons as Gail Hamilton-Mrs. Blaine's cousin-Sydney Hyde, Mary Clemmer Ames, Miss Foote, John W. Forney, Ben Perley Poore, and many other representatives of literary circles, while Senators Fenton, Conkling, Chandler, Bayard, Morton, Ferry, Howard, Drake, Carpenter, Thurman, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Fessenden, William Pitt Kellogg, and hosts of others represented the Senate. Of the House, there was Wilson, of Iowa; Frye and Blaine, of Maine; Hawley, of Connecticut; Pomeroy, of Kansas; Farnsworth and Burchard, of Illinois, and many others whose names are associated with the stirring events
by this ventilation of the question on the high arena of the Senate Chamber, of the value and importance of the survey, and American pride was gratified at the high standard maintained by the United States, both in the scientific and practical development of a great enterprise. The impression made upon the Senate was shown in the vote. Mr. Benton's bill received only two votes, his own being one of the two. Some years ago, when it was thought that Mr. Davis had passed from earth, John W. Forney used the following language: Jefferson Davis was blessed with many accomplishments. He was alike a soldier and statesman. No public man of my acquaintance was more devoted to scientific pursuits, and more familiar with the abstruse teachings of political philosophy. No branch of human knowledge seemed to be unworthy of his investigation. He was equally attentive to classical literature, to the details of military life, to the doctrines of political parties, to the study of men, a
then at Bovina, replied: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your communication. I moved at once with whole available force, about sixteen thousand, leaving Vaughn's brigade, about fifteen hundred, at Big Black Bridge; Tilghman's brigade, fifteen hundred, now at Baldwin's Ferry, I have ordered to bring up the rear of my column; he will be, however, fifteen or twenty miles behind it. Baldwin's Ferry will be left, necessarily, unprotected. To hold Vicksburg are Smith's and Forney's divisions, extending from Snyder's Mills to Warrenton, numbering effectives, seven thousand eight hundred men. I do not think that you fully comprehend the position that Vicksburg will be left in, but I comply at once with your order. On the same day General Pemberton, after his arrival at Edward's Depot, called a council of war of all the general officers present. He placed General Johnston's despatch before them, and stated his own views against the propriety of an advance, but
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
of the late President Lincoln. He has been held, says the decision, ever since, and is now held, as a military prisoner. The Washington Chronicle of that date insisted that the case is one well entitled to a trial before a military tribunal; the testimony before the Judiciary Committee of the House, all of it bearing directly, if not conclusively, on a certain intention to take the life of Mr. Lincoln, is a most important element in the case. This was reported to be from the pen of Mr. John W. Forney himself, then Clerk of the Senate. The House of Representatives, on motion of Mr. Boutwell, of Massachusetts, the following day passed a resolution that it was the opinion of the House that Jefferson Davis should be held in custody as a prisoner, and subject to trial according to the laws of the land. It was adopted by a vote of 105 to 19. It is very suggestive that, in the intermediate time, Mr. Clement C. Clay had been discharged from imprisonment without being tried on either
-Lecompton Dem., of Ind., 2; and there were 4 scattering: necessary to a choice 118. Finally, on the forty-fourth ballot, February 1, 1860. Mr. Smith's name having been withdrawn, the vote was declared: for Pennington 117; John A. McClernand, Dem., 85; John A. Gilmer, Amer., 16; and there were 15 scattering. Mr. Henry Winter Davis, of Md., who had hitherto voted with the Americans, now cast his vote for Pennington, and elected him — he having the exact number necessary to a choice. John W. Forney, anti-Lecompton Dem., was soon after elected Clerk by a close vote. The majority in the Senate was not merely Democratic of tile Lecompton or extreme pro-Slavery caste; it was especially hostile to Senator Douglas, and determined to punish him for his powerful opposition to the Lecompton bill, by reading him out of the party. To this end, Mr. Jefferson Davis submitted Feb. 2, 1860. an elaborate series of resolves, whereof the following is the most material: 4. Resolved, That n
s present from Tennessee, making 44 in all. Western Virginia had chosen three members at the regular State election in April, while another had been elected by a light vote, either then or subsequently, from the district lying along the Potomac, above and below Harper's Ferry. Of Representatives, 157 in all answered to their names at the first call. Galusha A. Grow [Republican], of Pennsylvania, was chosen Speaker, and Emerson Etheridge [Bell-Everett], of Tennessee, Clerk of the House. John W. Forney [Douglas], of Pennsylvania, was soon afterward elected Clerk of the Senate. President Lincoln's Message was transmitted to both Houses on the following day. It was largely devoted to a recital of occurrences already narrated. It did not distinctly avow that the Government had ever purposed the evacuation of Fort Sumter, but set forth the material facts as follows: On the 5th of March (the present incumbent's first full day in office), a letter of Major Anderson, commanding at For
fifteen miles distant, and were foolishly pushed on to attack, though the advantage in numbers, in position, and even in artillery, appears to have been decidedly on our side. They were, of course, easily and badly beaten; the Pennsylvanians fighting with cool intrepidity and entire confidence of success. Our aggregate loss was but 9 killed and 60 wounded--among the latter, Lieut.-Col. Kane, who led his men with signal gallantry. The Rebels lost, by their own account, 230; among them, Col. Forney, of the 10th Alabama, wounded, and Lieut. Col. Martin, killed. They left 25 horses dead on the field, with two caissons--one of them exploded,--running off their guns by hand; the 6th South Carolina, out of 315 present, losing 65--in part, by the fire of the 1st Kentucky (Rebel), which, mistaking them for Unionists, poured a murderous volley into them at forty yards' distance. It was a foolish affair on the part of Stuart, who was palpably misled by the gas-conade of Evans, with regard
315. Foote, H. S., of Miss., 197; opposes Clay's Compromise measures, 203; does not object to abolishing the Slave-Trade in the District, 204; 207; chosen Union Governor of Mississippi, 211. Foote, Capt., at the battle of Belmont, 597. Forney, Col. John H., (Rebel,) allusion to in Bragg's order, 436; wounded at Dranesville, 626. Forney, John W., chosen Clerk of the House, 806; chosen Clerk of the Senate, 555. Forsyth, John C., to envoy from Texas, 151, Fort Beauregard, besiegForney, John W., chosen Clerk of the House, 806; chosen Clerk of the Senate, 555. Forsyth, John C., to envoy from Texas, 151, Fort Beauregard, besieged and taken, 604-5. Fort Clark, bombarded, 599; captured, 600. Ft. Hatteras, bombarded, 599; captured, 600. Fort Jackson, Ga., seized by Georgia, 411. Fort Jackson, La., seized by the State, 412. Fort Macon, seized by North Carolina, 411. Fort McRae, seized by the Florida troops, 412. Fort Morgan, seized by Alabama, 412. Fort Moultrie, evacuated by Major Anderson, 407; what the Charleston papers said, 407-8; occupied by S. C., 409; fires on Star of the West, 412. Fort
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