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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
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they suffered severely. But the Second Maine, though low in ammunition, still kept the enemy in check. He plied the left wing of the Forty-fourth desperately, but it was more than a match for him. Col. Johnson was here wounded, and subsequently had his horse shot under him. Adjt. Houghton, of the same regiment, likewise received a flesh-wound in the leg. Maj. Chapin, of the Forty-fourth, received two severe wounds, one in the chest and one in the leg. Adjt. Knox was wounded in the wrist; Lieut. Fox in the shoulder; Lieut.-Col. Rice had his horse killed under him, and his sword cut off the belt by a musket-ball. But in vain the enemy pressed; these three heroic columns, though losing severely at every discharge, stood their ground most nobly, never yielding an inch. The Second Maine finally got out of ammunition, when Col. Roberts appealed for a chance to use cold steel if he could not get cold lead. While this hot fight was going on, the brigades which were in the advance were r
em, and lost one killed and seven wounded. The sick and wounded officers were all paroled on the spot, the rest were marched to Meminville with the soldiers, where the soldiers were paroled and sent back to Murfreesboro. They arrived in Nashville a few days ago, where they intend to remain until they are sent North. I was fortunate enough to get to the hospital and evade the parole. I shall soon join my company, which is now located in Tallahassee, with four others, under the command of Major Fox. After the rebels had completed their damnable work of destruction, they left the town and compelled the citizens to bury the dead. This shameful disaster is attributable to the mismanagement and cowardice of Colonel Leicester; had he left the regiments and battery in a condition to support each other, they might have whipped the enemy and saved the Government nearly a million dollars. Yours truly, T. D. Scofield. The Texas Rangers in the fight. Knoxville, Tenn., July 21. T
Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters First corps army of Virginia, August 23, 1862. Major-General Pope, Commanding Army of Virginia: There is no doubt that the enemy has outflanked us, and that his army crosses near Sulphur Springs and Fox's or Lawson's Ford. I therefore must instantly beg you to send General Reno's division to Fayetteville, which will be good and necessary for all emergencies — but it should be done to-night, and immediately. Gen. Banks, instead of marching to La Here Sergt. John E. Hershey, color-bearer, fell wounded. Corp. T. E. Joiner, of company G, true to duty, bore both colors across the open field, and handed one to James Hobday, of company I, who did it honor through the day. At this time Capt. W. W. F. Fox, of Gen. Veatch's staff, took the front, and called on the Forty-sixth to follow him, when they charged with cheer after cheer, until the field was again theirs; and in the last line, formed about four o'clock P. M., the brave and generous
Stevensburgh and Brandy station. It will be well, also, to send with them immediately a train, bread, sugar, coffee, and salt, as our railroad communications may be unsafe for a few days. (Signed) John Pope, Major-General. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters First corps army of Virginia, August 23, 1862. Major-General Pope, Commanding Army of Virginia: There is no doubt that the enemy has outflanked us, and that his army crosses near Sulphur Springs and Fox's or Lawson's Ford. I therefore must instantly beg you to send General Reno's division to Fayetteville, which will be good and necessary for all emergencies — but it should be done to-night, and immediately. Gen. Banks, instead of marching to Lawson's Ford, as directed by me, has not done it, and the enemy is therefore crossing at Fox's Ford, from which ford General Bayard retired an hour or two ago. From Fayetteville General Reno can advance to Lawson's Ford, or maintain his position until
er and from their own batteries, to the opposite bank of the river. Here the rebels made a stand, and confidently expected to repulse our forces, but the word was still forward, and on they marched on double-quick, and formed in line over the river. Here Sergt. John E. Hershey, color-bearer, fell wounded. Corp. T. E. Joiner, of company G, true to duty, bore both colors across the open field, and handed one to James Hobday, of company I, who did it honor through the day. At this time Capt. W. W. F. Fox, of Gen. Veatch's staff, took the front, and called on the Forty-sixth to follow him, when they charged with cheer after cheer, until the field was again theirs; and in the last line, formed about four o'clock P. M., the brave and generous Lieut. M. R. Thompson fell mortally wounded. I cannot close this report without special mention of Assistant Surgeon Benj. H. Bradshaw, who, unassisted, took the wounded from amid the ranks himself, doing far more than his duty. And also the offi