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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
ig.-Gen. . P. J. Semmes, Col. Goode Bryan; 10th Ga., Col. John B. Weems; 50th Ga., Col. W. R. Manning; 51st Ga., Col. E. Ball; 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford; 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan ; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. E. S. Barclay. Artillery, Col. H. C. Cabell; 1st N. C. Art., Batt. A, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. C. Fraser, Lieut. W. J. Furlong; 1st Richmond Howitzers, Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton, Lieut. C. W. Motes. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett:--Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. B. Garnett, Maj. C. S. Peyton; 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton; 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. H. A. Carrington; 19th Va., Col. Henry Gantt, Lieut.-Col. John T. Ellis; 28th Va., Col. R. C. Allen, Lieut.-Col. William Watts; 56th Va., Col. W. D. Stuart, Lieut.-Col. P. P. Slaughter. Kemper's
e road between this place and Richmond, Ky., to which point we pursued the enemy by command of Gen. G. Clay Smith. We are under great obligations to the companies from Cincinnati, Newport and Bracken county, Ky., under Capts. Wright, Arthur and Pepper, for their invaluable aid, who distinguished themselves on that occasion, and fought like heroes. The friends and relatives of the wounded of both sides are greatly indebted to Surgeon W. T. McNees, of the Seventh Kentucky cavalry, Doctors J. C. Fraser, A. Adams, W. O. Smith, J. A. Kirkpatrick, John A. Lair, and----McLeod, for their unremitting attention to the wounded, and to the ladies of Cynthiana unbounded praise is due, for their untiring ministrations upon the wounded, etc. I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant, J. J. Landrum, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. Captain Wright's report. Mayor Hatch and the Committee of Safety: gentlemen: On Sunday, the thirteenth inst., I received an order
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
aign. Of the Oglethorpe Siege Artillery the captains were: (A) J. Lamar, (B) Richard J. Nunn, (B) G. F. Oliver. This command was merged in the Twenty-second Georgia battalion. The captains of the Pulaski Artillery were J. P. W. Read and J. C. Fraser. This battery served with distinction in most of the great battles of the army of Virginia until after Fredericksburg, under Read, and afterward under Fraser. The Clinch Artillery, commanded by Capt. N. B. Clinch, served on the Georgia coaFraser. The Clinch Artillery, commanded by Capt. N. B. Clinch, served on the Georgia coast and participated in the defense of Savannah under Hardee in December, 1864. The same is true of the battery known as the Mercer Artillery, commanded by Capt. A. J. Macarthy. The Troup Artillery was commanded by Captain Stanley, and after the Seven Days battles by Capt. H. H. Carlton. It participated in nearly all the great battles of the army of Northern Virginia, and gained special distinction. The Echols Light Artillery, under Capt. John H. Tiller, served on the Georgia coast. Bar
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
Matthews; Sixtieth, Col. W. B. Jones; Sixty-first, Col. J. H. Lamar. The artillery commands from Georgia at Chancellorsville were: Sumter battalion, Lieut.-Col. A. S. Cutts, (A) Ross' battery, (B) Patterson's battery, (C) Wingfield's battery; Fraser's battery (Pulaski artillery) and Carlton's battery (Troup artillery), of Col. H. C. Cabell's battalion; and Milledge's battery of Col. William Nelson's battalion. Wingfield's and Milledge's batteries were in reserve and not actively engaged. Tf the Sumter battalion) rendered service in annoying the enemy during a charge of Hoke's brigade, and how the guns of Captain Patterson, (Company B of the same battalion) were fought until ammunition failed. Again General Pendleton says: Captain Fraser (Pulaski artillery), whom I saw under fire, enlisted warm approbation by his cool self-possession and ready power for emergency. Captain Carlton (Troup artillery) is also entitled to honorable mention for the persistent gallantry and efficie
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
o McLaws' division were two Georgia batteries, the Troup artillery, Capt. H. H. Carlton, and the Pulaski artillery, Capt. J. C. Fraser; also McCarthy's Virginia battery and Manly's North Carolina battery. This battalion, which opened the fight of Mcme a concentrated fire from the enemy's batteries --the loss of my battalion was very heavy during this cannonading. Captain Fraser (Pulaski artillery), who had always in previous engagements, as in this, set an example of the highest courage, coolnas wounded during the same engagement. The batteries in the peach orchard were driven off. The next day, finding that Capt. Fraser's command was so much crippled by the loss of men, I placed two of his guns (3-inch rifles), in charge of Capt. B. C. Manly, and two Parrott guns of Captain Fraser's battery, under command of Lieut. W. J. Furlong, were ordered to take position on the new and advanced line of battle. Capt. H. H. Carlton's battery (Troup artillery) and a section of Captain McCarthy's