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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 40 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 30 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. C. Fremont or search for J. C. Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 18. Gen. Fremont's proclamation. Headquarters Western Department. St. Louis, Aug. 30, 1ciation of the proclamation just uttered by Gen. Fremont, we quote the following from the columns of simulated alarm in the following clause of Gen. Fremont's proclamation: The property, real anno exception. As the declaration of Major-General Fremont is expressly restricted in its applicair persons or property. The declaration of Gen. Fremont under this head, however construed, would mwe condemn and regret the proclamation of General Fremont establishing martial law in Missouri and ecessity. It has not come too soon, and as Gen. Fremont has it now in his power to enforce his common, and peace will again be restored to us. Gen. Fremont tells us that the outrages hitherto committases, and the understanding between him and Gen. Fremont is too cordial to admit of the supposition udiated by those higher in authority than General Fremont. We must say, however, that the devotees[3 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
e Guards were marching from Lexington to Warrensburg, to rob the bank in that place, and plunder and arrest the citizens of Johnson County, in accordance with General Fremont's proclamation and instructions. Although my men were greatly fatigued by several days' continuous and rapid marching, I determined to press forward so as tos only the week previous to the arrival of Col. Mulligan, holding their session in the Court House, whence Claib. fulminated a proclamation counter to that of Gen. Fremont. When this worthy body prudently retired before the Federal troops, they did so in such haste that eight hundred thousand dollars in gold coin, and the State a heart for every fate. If we had reinforcements now, this rebel army would be in our power. We could both rout and destroy them. It is a great pity that Gen. Fremont has not sent forward more men. If we are finally beaten it will rest upon him, not us. I now reiterate, that this war could be speedily closed if they would pi
Doc. 106. Zagonyi's charge at Springfield, October 25, 1861. Fremont's report. Headquarters in the field, near Hamansville, Mo., Oct. 26, 1861. Capt. McKet such brilliant bravery I have never seen and did not expect. Their war cry, Fremont and the Union, broke forth like thunder. Charles Zagonyi, Major Commanding Bodjutant-General, Springfield, Missouri: sir: According to the order of Major-General Fremont, I left the camp south of the Pomme de Terre River on Thursday the 24th accomplish so much in the face of such a fearful disadvantage. At the cry of Fremont and Union, which was raised at every charge, they dashed forward repeatedly in 1861. Major White's report. Springfield, October 30, 1861. Major-General Fremont: On the 24th inst., after my return with my command, one hundred and fior six times as large as was supposed prior to leaving the Headquarters of General Fremont. Notwithstanding all this, the undaunted Major resolved to press on and e