hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 125 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 116 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 108 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 72 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 70 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 60 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 59 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 1,575 results in 283 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
n Sibley tents. the cooler weather of this latitude, and sheltered many regiments during their stay in the State, a still larger number found shelter in tents prior to their departure for the field. These tents were of various patterns, but the principal varieties used were the Sibley, the A or Wedge Tent, and the Hospital or Wall Tent. The Sibley tent was invented by Henry Sibley, in 1857. He was a graduate of the United States military academy at West Point, and accompanied Capt. John C. Fremont on one of his exploring expeditions. He evidently got his idea from the Tepee or Tepar,--the Indian wigwam, of poles covered with skins, and having a fire in the centre,--which he saw on the plains. When the Rebellion broke out, Sibley cast in his fortune with the South. He afterwards attained the rank of brigadier-general, but performed no services so likely to hand down his name as the invention of this tent. It has recently been stated that Sibley was not the actual inventor,
am H., 265 Enlisting, 34-42, 198-202 Envelopes (patriotic), 64-65 Everett, Edward, 16 Executions, 157-63 Faneuil Hall, 31,45 First Bull Run, 27, 251-53,298, 340,356 Flags, 338-40 Foraging, 231-49 Ford, M. F., 264 Fort Hell, 59,385 Fort Independence, 44 Fort Lyon, 255 Fort McAllister, 406 Fort Monroe, 120, 162 Fort Moultrie, 22 Fort Sedgewick, 385 Fort Sumter, 22 Fort Warren, 44-45 Fort Welch, Va., 162 Fredericksburg, 100,237,308, 391 Fremont, John C., 46 French, William H., 307,353 Fresh Pond, Mass., 45 Games, 65-66 Garrison, William L., 20 Geary, John W., 295 Georgetown, 298 Germanna Ford, Va., 317 Gettysburg, 54, 72,239, 259,273, 378,406 Goldsboro, N. C., 264 Grand Army of the Republic, 98, 228,268 Grant, Ulysses S., 115, 121, 240, 263,286,317,340, 350,362,370, 405; his Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, 279, 291, 317,359-62, 370-71 Griffin, Charles S., 329 Hampton, Wade, 295,321 Hancock, Winfie
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
in 1854, he identified himself with the Free-soil party, and in 1856 supported Fremont for the Presidency, though Senator Benton, Fremont's father-in-law, refused toFremont's father-in-law, refused to do this. He was elected to Congress that year, for the first time. In the presidential canvass of 1860 he had been the leader of the Republicans of Missouri, and s forced to surrender the next day. Price's loss was 25 killed and 72 wounded. Fremont reported to the War Department that the Union loss was 39 killed and 120 woundhis assistance; and that as for musket-caps, he had none to spare. General John C. Fremont, who had assumed command of the Union armies in the West on the 25th os over that difficult river on a single flat-boat was a tedious operation, but Fremont gave him all the time that he needed, and he got them safely over. After cho, where the General Assembly had been summoned by Governor Jackson to meet. Fremont continued to follow till the 2d of November, when he was superseded by Major-G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
In command in Missouri. John C. Fremont, Major-General, U. S. A. Off to the war. At the outbreak of the war, in the spring of ‘61, being then in England,ime and attention was devoted to meeting requisitions made upon them; that General Fremont had full power, and that he, as Fremont's chief quartermaster, must use hiFremont's chief quartermaster, must use his own judgment and do the best he could toward meeting the wants of the department. In July, at Washington, the subject of mortar-boats for the Mississippi expedes and the enemy were ready and intending battle. In the face of Major-General John C. Fremont. From a steel plate in possession of Sirs. Fremont. positive knowFremont. positive knowledge, General Hunter assumed that there was no enemy near and no battle possible, and withdrew the army. In support of the facts, I quote from the report of Genet Lincoln, dated October 24th, 1861, and accompanying the orders relieving General Fremont.-editors. The correctness of the operations in this campaign to meet t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The flanking column at Wilson's Creek. (search)
r falsehoods were repeated before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and a letter defamatory of me was dispatched to the Secretary of War (dated February 14th, 1862, six months after the battle of Wilson's Creek). I had no knowledge of these calumnies against me until long after the war, when I found them in print. In support of my statements, I would direct attention to my own reports on the battle and to the Confederate reports, especially to those of Lieutenant-Colonel Hyams and Captain Vigilini, of the 3d Louisiana; also to the report of Captain Carr, in which he frankly states that he abandoned me immediately before my column was attacked at the crossing of James Fork, without notifying me of the approach of the enemy's cavalry. I never mentioned this fact, as the subsequent career of General Carr, his cooperation with me during the campaigns of General Fremont, and his behavior in the battle of Pea Ridge vindicated his character and ability as a soldier and commander.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
we condense the following statement: Governor Jackson having appropriated the school fund of the State to the arming and equipment of the State troops, and the proposal having been made to force loans from certain banks for the same purpose, General Fremont, in order to checkmate this action of the Governor, ordered the funds of certain banks to be sent to St. Louis, not for the use of the Federal authorities, but to prevent their employment to aid the enemy. By his order, Colonel Marshall sec The Union State Government made demand afterward for the same sum, which was paid and bonds of the State issued therefor, which were redeemed at their face value when due. The sum given to Governor Jackson was charged by the bank to profit and loss. See also page 280 for General Fremont's declaration of policy in this respect. The funds of other banks of the State were taken possession of by the Federal authorities, transported to St. Louis, and in due time every dollar returned.--editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
issouri River, which was gallantly defended for three days by Colonel Mulligan. Meanwhile, General Fremont, who on the 25th of July had been placed in command of the Western Department, had organize the entreaties of Price, and prepared himself to cooperate in resisting the further advance of Fremont. Between Price and McCulloch it was explicitly understood that Missouri should not be given up without a struggle. Such was the condition of things when the intended operations of General Fremont were cut short by his removal from the command of the army (November 2d), his successor being Geg was not only a most deplorable military blunder, but also a political mistake. To get rid of Fremont, the good prospects and the honor of the army were sacrificed. It would be too mild an express north-west and south-west of Missouri, and comprising the three campaigns under Generals Lyon, Fremont, and Curtis, we must acknowledge the extraordinary activity represented in these movements. As
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
by the title of flag-officer, the title of admiral not being recognized at that time in our navy), as a special favor to him, to accompany the Benton, the eighth one of the fleet, in her passage down to Cairo. It was in December, and the water was falling rapidly. The Benton had been converted from the U. S. snag-boat Benton into the most powerful iron-clad of the fleet. She was built with two hulls about twenty feet apart, very strongly braced together. She had been purchased by General Fremont while he was in command of the Western Department, and had been sent to my ship-yard for alteration into a gun-boat. I had the space between the two hulls planked, so that a continuous bottom extended from the outer side of one hull to the outer side of the other. The upper side was decked over in the same manner; and by extending the outer sides of the two hulls forward until they joined each other at a new stem, which received them, the twin boats became one wide, strong, and substa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
General Polk and the battle of Belmont. His son, Dr. William M. Polk, Captain, C. S. A. On the 1st of November, 1861, General Fremont ordered General Grant at Cairo, and General C. F. Smith at Paducah, to hold their commands in readiness for a demonstration upon Columbus, Kentucky, a strong position then occupied by about ten thousand Confederate troops under General Leonidas Polk. The object of the proposed demonstration was to cover an effort to be made to drive General Jeff. Thompson from south-east Missouri; and at the same time to check the sending of reinforcements to Price. In accordance with this general plan, on the 4th and 6th Grant moved Colonels R. J. Oglesby, W. H. L. Wallace, and J. B. Plummer in the direction of the town of Sikeston, Mo. Next he ordered the garrison at Fort Holt opposite Cairo to advance in the direction of Columbus, and early on the morning of the 7th, with a force of about 3500 men of all arms, convoyed by the gunboats Lexington and Tyler, he
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
shoulders and a massive chest. He was strong and active, and of a military bearing.-W. P. J. imperial in extent, and his powers and discretion as large as the theory of the Confederate Government permitted. He lacked nothing except men, munitions of war, and the means of obtaining them. He had the right to ask for anything, and the State Executives had the power to withhold everything. the Mississippi River divided his department into two distinct theaters of war. West of the River, Fremont held Missouri with a force of from 60,000 to 80,000 Federals, confronted by Price and McCulloch in the extreme southwest corner of the State with 6000 men, and by Hardee, in north-eastern Arkansas, with about as many raw recruits down with camp diseases and unable to move. East of the Mississippi, the northern boundary of Tennessee was barely in his possession, and was held under sufferance from an enemy who, for various reasons, hesitated to advance. The Mississippi opened the way to a
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...