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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 125 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 116 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 108 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 72 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 70 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 60 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 59 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John C. Fremont or search for John C. Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Forward to New Orleans. --The New York Herald has exchanged the old war cry of "On to Richmond!" to "Forward to New Orleans, down the Mississippi!" It has now discovered that a victory over the rebel host on the Potomac would not end the war, but the true direction, "to make short work," is to take the long route, "down the Mississippi." As a preliminary to this, Missouri and Kentucky, it insists, must be secured from a fire in the rear. Fremont must be heavily reinforced, and then press down the Mississippi, whilst the Atlantic and Gulf seaboard must be assailed and a column landed in Mexico to cross the frontier of Texas. "The most effectual way, perhaps, of defending Washington, capturing Richmond and subduing Virginia, is by the way of the Mississippi." Attacked, in the seaboard, the Gulf, and the Mississippi says the Herald, "the rebels will retreat rapidly southward to defend their homes, and will leave Virginia to her fate." By the first of November, Mr. Secretary Well
Garibaldi. --The Northern journals again insist that Garibaldi is coming to assist them in their work of reducing the South to slavery. They are of opinion that Fremont's emancipation proclamation will elicit his special sympathies upon the Northern side. We believe that Garibaldi will find work more congenial to him nearer home; but it is a matter of little consequence. As a leader of Italian volunteers in the cause of Italian liberty he worked wonders, because he represented the popular sentiment and passion of oppressed Italy, and was the champion of a cause which, in many respects, resembled that of the South--the deliverance of a Southern clime and a gallant people from Northern oppressors and invaders. The Italian volunteers who composed his legion resembled in many respects our Southern volunteers--they were composed of the very clite of Italy: the nobility, the gentry, the professors, the educated men. Indeed, it is said that almost every man in the rank and file of
aggage, provision and forage; also, the public property seized by Gen. Green, at Shelbourne. Gen. Pope's infantry were too much fatigued to pursue them. The horsemen, however, followed in pursuit for ten or fifteen miles, until the enemy were completely scattered and dispersed. The railroad east of Brookfield is now open, and no more Secession camps will be made within twenty miles. Gen. Grant telegraphs to me that the first gun is in position at Fort Holt, Kentucky. J. C. Fremont, Major Gen'l Commanding. Jefferson City, Mo., Sept. 11. --A messenger from Sidallia states that Capt. Jamison's Kansas Jay Hawker's had defeated the notorious Dr. Staples, at the head of five hundred rebels, completely routing them and killing their leader. This will restore peace to Pettia and the surrounding counties, as Staples and McGoffin, who was captured some days since, were the principal instigators of secessionism in that section. It is also reported that
ders entire: Headquarters 1st Military District,Missouri State Guard, Camp Hunter, September 2, 1861. To all whom it may Concern: Whereas, Major-General John C. Fremont, commanding the minions of Abraham Lincoln in the State of Missouri, has seen fit to declare martial law throughout the whole State, and has threatenedember of the Missouri State Guard, or soldier of our allies, the armies of the Confederate States, who shall be put to death in pursuance of the said order of General Fremont, that I will "hang, draw and quarter" a minion of said Abraham Lincoln. While I am anxious that this unfortunate war should be conducted, as far as possie, and every order that I have issued has been with that object, yet, if this rule be abandoned (and it must first be done by our enemies,) I intend to exceed General Fremont in his excesses, and will make all tories that come within my power rue the day that a different policy was adopted by their leaders. Already mills, barn
A Successor to Gen. Fremont. New York, Sept. 14. --The Washington correspondent of the Commercial Advertiser says that Gen. Fremont will be succeeded by Gen. Meigs. A Successor to Gen. Fremont. New York, Sept. 14. --The Washington correspondent of the Commercial Advertiser says that Gen. Fremont will be succeeded by Gen. Meigs.