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John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 13 1 Browse Search
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ans criticized as the Anaconda the three fields of conflict Fremont appointed Major General his military failures- battle of Wilson's Creek Hunter ordered to Fremont Fremont's proclamation President Revokes Fremont's proclamation Lincoln's letter to Browning- sFremont's proclamation President Revokes Fremont's proclamation Lincoln's letter to Browning- surrender of Lexington Fremont takes the field Cameron's visit to Fremont Fremont's removal The military genius and experience of GenPresident Revokes Fremont's proclamation Lincoln's letter to Browning- surrender of Lexington Fremont takes the field Cameron's visit to Fremont Fremont's removal The military genius and experience of General Scott, from the first, pretty correctly divined the grand outline of military operations which would become necessary in reducing the reFremont takes the field Cameron's visit to Fremont Fremont's removal The military genius and experience of General Scott, from the first, pretty correctly divined the grand outline of military operations which would become necessary in reducing the revolted Southern States to renewed allegiance. Long before the battle of Bull Run was planned, he urged that the first seventy-five regimentsFremont Fremont's removal The military genius and experience of General Scott, from the first, pretty correctly divined the grand outline of military operations which would become necessary in reducing the revolted Southern States to renewed allegiance. Long before the battle of Bull Run was planned, he urged that the first seventy-five regiments of three months militia could not be relied on for extensive campaigns, because their term of service would expire before they could be wellFremont's removal The military genius and experience of General Scott, from the first, pretty correctly divined the grand outline of military operations which would become necessary in reducing the revolted Southern States to renewed allegiance. Long before the battle of Bull Run was planned, he urged that the first seventy-five regiments of three months militia could not be relied on for extensive campaigns, because their term of service would expire before they could be well organized. His outline suggestion, therefore, was that the new three years volunteer army be placed in ten or fifteen healthy camps and giv