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deral batteries, and soon the whole division melted away before the hot reception of the Confederates. Just then, at a little past 9 o'clock, the nearly 6,000 of French's division of Sumner's corps, moving still further to the Federal left, under shelter of the low ridge above Mumma's house, advanced to assault D. H. Hill, on theommand were placed at right angles to each other. Into these open arms of as brave and steady veterans as ever shouldered a musket, advanced the front brigade of French. From Hill's left a terrific fire sent French's men, with heavy loss, to the rear. He then advanced a second line to meet Anderson in the lane, but the musketry from Hill's right soon drove these back, behind the shelter of the hill, where the remaining two-thirds of French's brigade sought safety, having left one-third of their number between the arms of Hill's lines. The 6,000 veterans of Richardson's division, of Sumner's corps, now approached Hill's left, along the crest of the rid
's hill, to advance from the cover of the streets of Fredericksburg, of the embankments of the railway, and of the water-power canal, in a vain attempt to capture the batteries of the Washington artillery and of Alexander, then steadily belching destruction from the Marye hill. The broken plain between Fredericksburg and the sunken Telegraph road, with its stone fence in front and its battery-crowned ridge above, was swept by a cross-fire of heavy guns from front and from right and left. French's division, of Sumner's corps, led the Federal advance toward Marye's heights along two of the streets of Fredericksburg. The head of these columns came into the Confederate view at about 11 o'clock. They marched across the canal bridges, then wheeled into line of battle, and with brigade front, at intervals of 200 yards, moved forward, under cover of the fire of long range guns from Stafford heights. The cannon from Marye's hill, at point-blank range, gashed them in front; those from Stan
h Cavalry): Funsten, Oliver R., lieutenant-colonel; Patrick, William, major. Seventeenth Cavalry regiment (formed from French's Cavalry battalion): French, William H., colonel; Smith, Frederick F., major; Tavenner, William C. . lieutenant-colonel.French, William H., colonel; Smith, Frederick F., major; Tavenner, William C. . lieutenant-colonel. Seventeenth Infantry regiment: Brent, George William, major; Corse, Montgomery D., colonel; Herbert, Arthur, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Marye, Morton, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Munford, William, lieutenant-colonel; Simpson, Robert H.,ith, George H., colonel: Imboden, John D., colonel. Sixty-third Infantry regiment: Dunn, David C., lieutenantcol-onel; French, James M., major, colonel; Lynch, Connally H., lieutenant-colonel; McMahon, John J., colonel. Sixty-fourth Mounted Infon's Infantry battalion (see also Sixth battalion North Carolina Infantry): Cohoon, John T. P. C., lieutenant-colonel. French's Cavalry battalion (merged into Thirty-second regiment): Goggin, James M., major. Harris' Heavy Artillery battalion (
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early months of 1861 are preserved in our State Library—a lamentable loss. Further, of the Executive Journal, which might assist in the want of the proceedings referred to, there is preserved in the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth only the record to the month of December, 1860
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, (search)
XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early months of 1861 are preserved in our State Library—a lamentable loss. Further, of the Executive Journal, which might assist in the want of the proceedings referred to, there is preserved in the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth only the record to the month of December, 1860
f Rockbridge, nominated John L. Eubank, of the city of Richmond. Mr. Garland, of Amherst, seconded the nomination of Mr. Eubank. Mr. Scott of Fauquier, seconded the nomination of Mr. Turner. Mr. Leare, of Goochland, nominated S. Bassett French, of Chesterfield. Mr. MacFARLANDarland, of Richmond, advocated the election of Mr. Eubank. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, nominated John Bell Bigger, of the city of Richmond. Mr. Wickham, of Henrico, nominated R. Landsay Walker, of New Kent. Mr. Fordes, of Buckingham, advocated the election of Mr. Eubank. the Secretary then proceeded to call the roll, and the result of the vote was announced as follows: Stephen C. Whittle6 S. Bassett French8 John Bell Bigger9 R. L. Walker11 Green Peyton11 John L. Eubank16 S. T. Walker19 Zephaniah T. Turner28 There being no election, the Convention again proceeded to vote, and the result having been announced, it appeared there was no choice. A gent
e consent of the Convention, for that solemn purpose. In response to this request, Dr. Hoge delivered a most impressive appeal to the God of Battles, for counsel and succor in the present difficulties and dangers which threatened the South and the great principle of civil liberty. The Convention was then thoroughly organized by the election of Vice Presidents--among whom were Hon. James A. Seddon, Willoughby Newton, Esq., and other well known and highly distinguished gentlemen; Col. S. Bassett French as Secretary, and Nat. Tyler, Esq., of the Enquirer, as Assistant Secretary. Various committees were then appointed, and several resolutions of a highly important character were adopted. Every proposition, when put to the vote, was adopted without a dissenting voice, the greatest harmony and unanimity prevailing. As the session was a secret one, and as we were only admitted by the courtesy of one of the Marshals, we are not permitted to divulge the character of the business transa
patriotic duty which they have just performed; and, forgetting all past dissensions, we will rally with united hearts and hands in defence of the honor, safety and independence of Virginia and the Confederate States. On the motion of Col. S. Bassett French, it was Resolved, unanimously, That the members of this Convention do here, in the presence of Almighty God, and of each other, pledge themselves and each other, their fortunes and sacred honors, in defence of their native soil. of Col. S. Bassett French, it was Resolved, unanimously, That the members of this Convention do here, in the presence of Almighty God, and of each other, pledge themselves and each other, their fortunes and sacred honors, in defence of their native soil. Ordered, that the Secretary of this Convention be directed to deliver a copy of the foregoing resolutions to the President of the State Convention and to the Governor of this Commonwealth. A Copy — Teste: S. Bassett French, Sec'y.
loyalty. Mr. V. came highly commended and vouched for by persons confided in by Gov. Letcher, his Aids, the Hon. Jeremiah Morton and Hon. H. A. Edmundson, and the Governor has now no reason to believe that he has been imposed upon. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient , S. Bassett French, Aid-de-Camp to Gov. of Va. W. W. Holden, Esq., Ed. R. Standard. I certify this to be a true copy of a letter from me to Mr. Halden, written by direction of Gov. Letcher. S. Bassett French. loyalty. Mr. V. came highly commended and vouched for by persons confided in by Gov. Letcher, his Aids, the Hon. Jeremiah Morton and Hon. H. A. Edmundson, and the Governor has now no reason to believe that he has been imposed upon. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient , S. Bassett French, Aid-de-Camp to Gov. of Va. W. W. Holden, Esq., Ed. R. Standard. I certify this to be a true copy of a letter from me to Mr. Halden, written by direction of Gov. Letcher. S. Bassett French.
Tobacco Inspector resigned --The office of 1st Inspector of Tobacco at Dibrell's Warehouse, in this city, conferred by Gov. Letcher on Col. S. Bassett French, of Chesterfield has been resigned by the latter, Mr. Dan'l. E. Gardner is the 2d Inspector at Dibrell's.
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