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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
be erected at Richmond in memory of General Robert E. Lee. We will not offend good taste by offering a word in commendation of this effort to do honor to the great captain; we the rather assume that every reader of these Papers will gladly and promptly forward a liberal contribution to the Treasurer at Richmond. The Association is administered by a Board of Managers composed of the Governor of Virginia, the Auditor and the Treasurer. The Hon. R. M. T. Hanter is the treasurer, and Col. S. Bassett French is the secretary of the Board. Address, Richmond, Va. the Lee memorial Association, with headquarters at Lexington, Va., has been quietly working for its simple object, which is to decorate the tomb of Lee. Having secured Valentine's splendid recumbent figure of Lee — which is, beyond all question, one of the most superb works of art on the continent — they are now raising funds with which to build the Mausoleum which is to contain it. Surely the admirers of our great chieftain
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
ce present was about three thousand. He had in some previous skirmishes lost about 130 men in killed and wounded. Taking the average for the strength of the absent regiment, and we make the whole force brought by him about 3,700. On page 325 Colonel Manning, commanding Walker's brigade, says: The brigade, composed of the Third Arkansas, Thirtieth Virginia, Fifty-seventh Virginia, Twenty-seventh North Carolina and Fifty-sixth North Carolina regiments, and the Second Georgia battalion, Captains French's and Branch's light batteries, and Captain Goodwin's cavalry company--in all amounting to about four thousand men and officers — crossed the pontoon bridge and reached General Huger about 12 o'clock M. on Friday the 27th of June. The Fifty-seventh Virginia was subsequently transferred to Armistead's brigade, and in its place was put the Forty-eighth North Carolina. On page 151, Holmes says the brigade returned to him on the 29th of June, with 3,600 effective men and two batteries. O
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
as Adjutant-General of General Loring. He ought to be at the head of a regiment. He is a faithful, energetic officer, and at this time I should suppose not wanted in his present position. Cannot he get a Virginia regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel S. Bassett French as Lieutenant-Colonel, and be sent out here? I want troops badly, and want them for the war. I fear Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is very strong, and his fleet all-powerful in these waters. As yet he has effected but little, and if he will leave his big floating guns, that sweep over the lowlands like a scythe, I hope he will not have everything his own way. With my best wishes, my dear Governor, for your health and happiness, and kind regards to all around you, I remain with high respect, truly and sincerely yours, R. E. Lee.