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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
oath of allegiance. The time for such measures is past. They are all to be held as prisoners of war, and held in jail to the end of the war. Acting upon these suggestions, some of those who were charged with bridge-burning, but not found guilty, were hung under circumstances of great cruelty. In compliance with Benjamin's savage instructions, they were left hanging in public places, to receive the indignities of a brutal mob. Such was the case with the bodies of two victims (Hensie and Fry), who were hanged together upon the limb of an oak tree. near the railway-station, at Greenville, Tennessee, by the hands of Colonel Leadbetter, already mentioned. See page 174, volume I. This man, who was guilty of enormous crimes, it is said, during the war, and fled to Upper Canada at its close, died at Clifton, in that province, of apoplexy, on the 25th of September, 1866. He ordered their bodies to hang there four days and nights; and when the trains upon the road passed by, they wer
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ationed in advance of the main body. That officer formed his own and the Fourth Kentucky (Colonel S. S. Fry) in battle order, at the junction of the Somerset and Mill Spring Roads, about five miles General Zollicoffer, whose loss, at that time, was irreparable. Zollicoffer was killed by Colonel Fry, of the Fourth Kentucky. That officer, according to his own statement in a letter to his wifissippians, when he was mistaken for a Confederate officer by Zollicoffer. The latter rode up to Fry, saying as he pointed toward the Mississippians, You are not going to fight your friends, are you? At that instant Zollicoffer's aid, Major Henry M. Fogg, of Nashville, fired at Fry, wounding his horse. Fry turned and fired, killing Zollicoffer, not knowing at the time his person or his rank. Fry turned and fired, killing Zollicoffer, not knowing at the time his person or his rank. He was covered in a white rubber coat, and on the previous evening had his beard shaved off, so as not to be easily recognized. The aid of Zollicoffer was mortally wounded at the same time. Zollic
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
Bowling Green and Glasgow, when General Rosecrans assumed the command of it, on the 30th of October, 1862. and proceeded to reorganize it. The army was arranged in three grand divisions. The right, composed of the divisions of General J. W. Sill, Philip H. Sheridan, and Colonel W. E. Woodruff, was placed in charge of Major-General Alexander McD. McCook; the center, under Major-General George H. Thomas, composed of the divisions of General L. H. Rousseau, J. S. Negley, E. Dumont, and S. S. Fry; and the left, under T. L. Crittenden, composed of the divisions of Generals T J. Wood, H. P. Van Cleve, and W. S. Smith. Rosecrans placed the cavalry in charge of Major-General D. S. Stanley, of the Army of the Mississippi, and appointed the accomplished Julius P. Garesche his Chief of Staff. Captain J. St. Clair Morton was his Chief Engineer, and Colonel William Truesdall was appointed Chief of the Army Police. The services of the latter officer cannot be too highly estimated. He gath
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
re remote from the impure water and atmosphere of the battle-field, soon wrought a favorable change in the health of the army. During this period the ordinary outpost duties of an army in the vicinity of an enemy were shared by all the troops, but no other active service against the enemy was performed, excepting occasional reconnaissances by the cavalry and an expedition to destroy the bridge on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad at Bear Creek, 26 miles east of Corinth, in which General S. S. Fry's brigade, of Thomas' division, took an active part. These were, I believe, in each case successfully executed, but as they were conducted by officers not under my immediate command, I cannot detail them particularly. The force which advanced against Corinth, under the command of Major-General Halleck, was composed of the Army of the Ohio, under my command; the Army of the Mississippi, under the command of Major-General Pope, and the Army of the Tennessee, under the immediate comm
and in good order, and reported to Col. M. C. Manson, commanding the advance brigade, who in ten minutes had his two regiments--10th Indiana and 4th Kentucky, Col. S. S. Fry--in readiness; and the Rebels, in that hour of darkness, necessarily proceeded with caution, doubling themselves as they advanced. Thomas was of course at ththe battle-field and another by the way. In the heat of the battle, when the combatants were scarcely separated by an open space, Gen. Zollicoffer was shot by Col. Fry, and fell dead on the field, where his body was left by his followers. Col. Fry's horse was shot dead directly afterward. Col. Robert L. McCook, 9th Ohio, was Col. Fry's horse was shot dead directly afterward. Col. Robert L. McCook, 9th Ohio, was wounded in the leg, and also had his horse shot. The Rebels lost 192 killed, 62 wounded and captured, besides those carried off by them, and 89 taken unhurt. Our loss was 39 killed, and 207 wounded. It rained, as usual, and the roads were horrible; but the victors, considerably reenforced, were, before 4 P. M., in front of th
Phil. H. Sheridan, and Col. W. E. Woodruff at the head of its subordinate divisions respectively; the Center, under Maj.-Gen. Geo. II. Thomas, with its subordinate divisions led by Maj.-Gen. L. H. Rousseau, Brig.-Gens. Negley, Palmer, Dumont, and Fry; whereof Dumont and Fry were soon reliever, and Palmer transferred to the Left Wing, of which Maj.-Gen. T. L. Crittenden had command, and which consisted of the sub-divisions of Brig.-Gens. T. J. Wood, II. P. Van Cleve, and W. S. Smith. RosecransFry were soon reliever, and Palmer transferred to the Left Wing, of which Maj.-Gen. T. L. Crittenden had command, and which consisted of the sub-divisions of Brig.-Gens. T. J. Wood, II. P. Van Cleve, and W. S. Smith. Rosecrans assigned the chief command of his dilapidated cavalry to Maj.-Gen. D. S. Stanley ; while Lt.-Col. Julius P. Garesche--an officer of rare capacity and merit — was placed at tile head of his staff, with Capt. J. St. Clair Morton as Chief Engineer, and Col. Wm. Truesdail as Chief of Army Police. The railroad having been rendered serviceable, Rosecrans left Nov. 10. Bowling Green by special train for Mitchellsville; where he took horse and proceeded to Nashville, whose garrison, commanded by
n the road, to await the attack, ordering the Fourth Kentucky, (Col. S. S. Fry,) to support him, and then informed me in person that the enemyil the return of the brigade to camp at Logan's Cross Roads. Col. S. S. Fry, Fourth Kentucky regiment, was slightly wounded whilst his regiemy, during which time Gen. Zollicoffer fell from a shot from his (Col. Fry's) pistol, which, no doubt, contributed materially to the discomfir was being executed, the Fourth Kentucky regiment, commanded by Colonel Fry, came up and took position on the left of my left wing, and openn the rear of these batteries, in the Woods. The Fourth Kentucky, Col. Fry, was the next regiment on the road, half a mile in the rear of theThe most important event of the day was the death of Zollicoffer. Col. Fry of the Fourth Kentucky charged up a hill by himself upon a group oof the master-spirits of the rebellion, fell off his horse, dead. Col. Fry was, luckily, unhurt; but his horse was shot through the body, the
How Zollicoffer was Killed.--Mrs. Fry, wife of Col. S. S. Fry, of the Fourth Kentucky regiment, received a letter at DanCol. S. S. Fry, of the Fourth Kentucky regiment, received a letter at Danville, from Col. Fry, written after the battle near Somerset. He details in the letter the manner in which he killed Gen. ZCol. Fry, written after the battle near Somerset. He details in the letter the manner in which he killed Gen. Zollicoffer, which varies somewhat from the many statements we have seen. Col. Fry was in the act of leading his regiment inCol. Fry was in the act of leading his regiment into a charge upon the Mississippians, when Gen. Zollicoffer, accompanied by his aid, rode up to him and said: You are not goir friends. In the mean time Zollicoffer's aid fired upon Col. Fry, wounding his horse, from which wound the animal died. CCol. Fry then turned and fired upon Zollicoffer with fatal effect. Gen. Zollicoffer evidently labored under the impression that Col. Fry was a rebel officer. The stories about the old intimacy of the two officers are all untrue. They had never met before, nor did Col. Fry know the rank of the officer upon whom he fired, as the evidences of his rank were covered by a c
Ninth Ohio, and one or two of the Wolford cavalry. The Michigan Engineer and Mechanics' regiment dug trenches and buried the dead, the funeral service having been appropriately performed on the occasion. Wounded prisoners state that there was no general enthusiasm, but that the growing discontent induced Gen. Zollicoffer to make a speech to his troops the day before he led them to battle, in which he declared with emphasis, that he would take them to Indiana, or go to h--1 himself! After Col. Fry's horse was shot and disabled, he mounted the splendid gray charger which Zollicoffer had ridden. As the Federal army advances, the Union people creep out of their holes and hiding-places, and evince the most frantic delight; they are eager to receive arms and to be marched against those who have so long terrorized their homes. As plenty of muskets were found in the deserted camp of the rebels, we presume their wishes will be gratified. One man, residing on the Cumberland, had been robbe
brag on. He made his last stand On the rolling Cumberland, And was sent to the happy land of Canaan. Old Zolly's gone, And the secesh will have to mourn, Because they thought he'd do to depend on; But he knew his end was nigh When he met with Colonel Fry, Who sent him to the happy land of Canaan. Oh! Zollicoffer's dead, And the last words he said: “I see another wild cat a comina.” Up steps Colonel Fry, And shot him in the eye, And sent him to the happy land of Canaan. The dead brought toColonel Fry, And shot him in the eye, And sent him to the happy land of Canaan. The dead brought to Life again.--The following remarkable incident occurred in Dodgeville, Wisconsin: When the present war first broke out, a young man who resided in the above village joined a company commanded by Capt. Tom Allen, which was afterward incorporated in the Second regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, and was present at the terrible and disastrous battle of Bull Run. The intelligence came back to his family at Dodgeville that he was slain upon the battle-field, and his body left to be cared for by t
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