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ization as follows: General Walker's corps, composed of Liddell's and Gist's divisions, the former commanding his own brigade, under Colonel D. C. Govan, and Walthall's brigade; and Gist commanding Ector's brigade, and another, under Colonel Wilson, took position on our right, with Cheatham's division in reserve. Stewart's division, composed of Clayton's, Bate's and Brown's brigades of Buckner's corps, formed the centre; and Bushrod Johnson's division, composed of his own brigade, under Colonel Fulton, and McNair's and Gregg's, with Hood's division, commanded by General Law, and Preston's and Breckinridge's division, formed on our left wing, under command of General Hood, General Longstreet not having come up. Our right wing was commanded by General Polk. It was contemplated by General Bragg to make a flank movement and turn the enemy's left, so as to get our forces between him and Chattanooga, and thus cut off his retreat, believing that the main force of the enemy was at Lee and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
and Colonel Ellet, whose ram fleet was in advance of the now pursuing flotilla, raised the flag over that stronghold likewise. June 5. The same evening the flotilla of gun-boats Benton, Captain Phelps; Carondelet, Captain Walke; St. Louis, Lieutenant-commanding McGonigle; Louisville, Captain Dove; Cairo, Lieutenant Bryant. anchored at about a mile and a half above Memphis, and the ram fleet These consisted of the Monarch Queen of the West, Lioness, Switzerland, Mingo, Lancaster No. 3, Fulton, Hornet, and Samson, all under the general command of Colonel Ellet. a little farther up the river. The Confederate fleet, It consisted of the General Van Dorn (Hollins's flagship), General Price, General Bragg, General Lovell, Little Rebel, Jeff. Thompson, Sumter, and General Beauregard. now commanded by Commodore Montgomery, in place of Hollins, was then lying on the Arkansas shore, opposite Memphis, with steam up, and ready for action. At dawn on the morning of the 6th, June. the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
way, nearly twenty miles southward from Iuka. On the morning of the 19th they pushed on in light marching order toward Iuka, with Mizner's cavalry, driving a Confederate guard from Barnett's Corners; and early in the afternoon Hamilton's division, moving cautiously, in expectation of hearing the co-operating guns of Ord, and skirmishing almost continually, was within two miles of Iuka, on densely wooded heights, at a cross-road connecting the highways running from the village to Jacinto and Fulton respectively. There Hamilton formed a line of battle and advanced his skirmishers, who found the Confederates in strong force and position along a deep ravine behind the crest of the hill. The skirmishers were driven back, and a severe battle was immediately begun. The ground, covered with underbrush, was difficult to operate upon; but, after much exertion, the Eleventh Ohio battery, under a heavy fire of grape, canister, and shell, was put in position on the crest of the hill, so as to
at noon, having been driving in the enemy's skirmishers for the last two miles. Disappointed in clearing no guns from Ord's column, lie did not choose to push his four brigades against the more numerous army in their front on separate roads, which precluded their reciprocal support, but advanced slowly — Hamilton's division in front — up to a point two miles from Iuka, where a cross-road connected that from Jacinto, on which lie was moving, with the road leading south-east-ward from Iuka to Fulton; where, at 4 P. M., the Rebels were found drawn up in force, holding a strong position along a deep ravine crossing the main road, and behind the crest of a hill. Here our skirmishers were driven back on the head of the column in advance, which was suddenly saluted with a heavy fire of musketry, grape, canister, and shell, under which the 11th Ohio battery was with difficulty brought into position, with the 5th Iowa, Col. Matthias, and 26th Missouri, Col. Boomer, supporting it; the 48th Ind
ampment. It is within two miles of the Kentucky line, and has 5,600 soldiers. At half-past 9 the drum-call gathered our congregation in Col. Battle's regiment. Rev. J. A. Edmondson has lately been elected their chaplain from the ranks. We had a respectful hearing for the sermon, reverent attitude in prayer, and were assisted by some good voices in singing. About the same hour, Brother Armstrong, Chaplain of Col. Hatton's regiment, Brother Crisman, of Col. Newman's, Brother Tucker, of Col. Fulton's, Brother Poindexter, of Col. Savage's, were conducting Divine service. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon we conducted a brief religious service for Col. Palmer's regiment. This regiment held an election last Thursday, and has secured an excellent chaplain, Rev. J. H. Richie, of the Tennessee Conference. Brother Richie went through the Mexican campaign, in the ranks. After dinner, in company with Brother Armstrong, we went through the hospitals located in this region. The sick list — me
Praying on John Brown's sentence seat.--When Gen. Patterson's column had entered Charlestown, Va., and taken possession of the Court House, and raised our flag, to the great indignation of the rebel citizens, the Rev. Mr. Fulton, Chaplain of the First Scott Legion regiment, went into the building and immediately walked up to the bench, and sat down in the chair from which John Brown received his death sentence, and there offered a prayer for our President, our army, our counsellors, and country, while also beseeching God to crush the rebellion, its leaders, and its cause.--Phila. Bulletin, Aug. 2.
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 8: from Hatteras to New Orleans. (search)
nt through the great labor of unloading everything from the hold of the vessel, fore and aft, and as we had about thirteen hundred tons of coal on board when we started, that was no small labor. Then the difficulty was to get this water out of the forward hold. There were valves which could be opened so as to let the water flow through each bulkhead into the well of the vessel where it could be pumped out by the engine. As the vessel had been fitted out and loaded under the command of Captain Fulton whom I still held under arrest, I found it necessary to release him and engage his help. He was then and there investigated by a board of inquiry and restored to his command, Mr. Sturgis having gone away with Captain Glisson. We then found that the captain had put in no water-ways to conduct the water from the water-tight compartments, so that it might run through freely without spreading over the compartments. We further found that the lower hold had been filled up with coal, and in
and the officers who were with him. He left at midnight on the twenty-eighth. with nine hundred chosen horsemen, splendidly equipped for fighting or running. The two battalions were composed of the Second Michigan and Second Iowa. His first point, by a very circuitous route, was Iuka — a beautiful town, looking like a New-England village, containing one thousand inhabitants, and is a resort for invalids, on account of its splendid chalybeate springs. From Iuka he crossed to Eastport and Fulton, thence by the Tuscumbia and Jacinto road to Cartersville, to Padens, and from there struck the head-waters of the Tombigbee River, and crossed to Boonville, on the Mobile Railroad. His movements were made with such boldness and celerity, that they were supposed by the people to be rebel cavalry. Upon approaching the place, a large train of cars containing three thousand infantry were on the track. The Colonel wisely kept in the bushes until they moved off — only sent his men above and cl
r amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel Neff, of the Thirty-third Virginia, was killed. The wounded have all been removed to hospitals established near Aldie, in the county of Loudoun. As our informants proceeded towards Aldie, on Friday morning, they heard tremendous cannonading in the direction of the battle-field of the day before. Of the result of
r amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel Neff, of the Thirty-third Virginia, was killed. The wounded have all been removed to hospitals established near Aldie, in the county of Loudoun. As our informants proceeded towards Aldie, on Friday morning, they heard tremendous cannonading in the direction of the battle-field of the day before. Of the result of
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