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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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imes, remained with his regiment until exhausted. In common with the entire command I regret his temporary absence from the field, where he loved to be. Major Hart, Second North Carolina troops, commanded the skirmishers faithfully and well. To the field and company officers, one and all, my thanks are due for the zeal and bravery displayed under the most trying circumstances. To the gentlemen of my staff I owe especial thanks for services rendered on the march and upon the field. Captain Seaton Gales, assistant adjutant-general, and Lieutenant Richmond, aid-de-camp, were with me all the time, promptly carrying orders under the very hottest fire. I take pleasure, too, in speaking of the bearing of private James Stinson, courier, a youth of twenty, who displayed qualities a veteran might boast of, and of the conduct of private J. F. Beggarly, also a courier to headquarters. To Dr. Briggs, senior surgeon of the brigade, my thanks are due for his skill, zeal, and care of the wounded
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General George Burgwyn Anderson—The memorial address of Hon. A. M. Waddell, May 11, 1885. (search)
attacking columns was one of the most desperate and sanguinary of the war, as the list of casualties abundantly proves, but the enemy were repulsed. They then attacked the Confederate centre and right with the same overwhelming numbers, and, after temporary success, were again repulsed. It was during the attack on the centre that General Anderson received the wound which, though not suspected at the time, proved to be a mortal one. He occupied, said his adjutant-general, the late Major Seaton Gales, a prominent position on slightly rising ground, immediately in rear of his command. While thus exposed, and displaying the most splendid conduct, animating his men by his example and directing them by his cool and collected orders, he was struck in the foot, near the ankle-joint, by a minnie ball, and fell. He was at once carried, with difficulty and danger, to an improvised hospital in the rear, and the wound examined and pronounced severe, but not serious. No one dreamed that one
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
isplayed under the most trying circumstances. To the gentlemen of my-staff I owe especial thanks for services rendered on the march and upon the field. Captain Seaton Gales, Assistant adjutant-general, and Lieutenant Caleb Richmond, aide-de-camp, were with me all the time, promptly carrying orders under the very hottest fire. y fire, fell back, which exposed my brigade to a concentrated, direct, and left oblique fire. Seeing that I could not maintain this advanced position, my aide, Major Gales, was sent to General Early with a request to have a battery placed on a hill in my rear. This was promptly done, when my men fell back and were formed behind twas then riding slowly along the pike. He returned to the General and came back and said the General said he wished I would do it. I then dispatched Assistant-Adjutant-General Gales to General Battle, who, after the fall of Rodes, was in command of the division, with information as to where I was and what I was doing. I then tur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
never turned their backs upon the foe. They believed that their leader would require them to endure no sacrifice or face no danger that was not demanded by the inevitable exigencies of the situation. With God's help, Hill determined to save the army, as his chief ordered him to do at any sacrifice, and, if the emergency had demanded his own life, he would have met death, not as the degree of fate, but as the Providence of God, who had brought him face to face with a desperate duty. Captain Seaton Gales, the gallant Adjutant-General of George B. Anderson, on that memorable day, has summarized the important results of this battle so clearly that I prefer to reproduce his language rather than use an extract from report of history, or to make a vain attempt to improve upon it myself. Of this battle it may be safely said that in its consequences, in the accomplishments of pre-determined objects, and in the skilful disposition of small numbers to oppose overwhelming odds, it is without
or J. M. Wilson, Seventh Louisiana regiment, wounded; Edward C. Minor, of Charlottesville, a member of the New Kent cavalry, arm shot off; Lieutenant Colonel Pendleton, assistant adjutant-general to General Early, mortally wounded; Captain Duncan, of Louisiana, killed; Lieutenant Henry Long, of the same State, wounded; Captain Lasley, company K, Second Virginia cavalry, and Hugh Garth, of Albemarle, same company, killed; Edward Wills, of Lynchburg, a member of Massie's battery, killed; Major Seaton Gales, of North Carolina, captured. General Wharton is reported wounded. From Petersburg. Since our last report no movements of importance have transpired on the lines in front of Petersburg. Save the occasional discharge of a musket, and, at long intervals, the boom of a cannon, everything continued quiet yesterday. On our right, where, if anywhere, a fight has been considered imminent for several days past, the enemy show no present disposition to make any movement, and the cons