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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 24: on the natural disapproval of wealth (search)
ired fisherman, who delighted to corner in argument a set of eminent clergymen who then resorted there, as Dr. Chapin, Dr. Gannett, Dr. Bartol, Thomas Starr King, and others. He liked to swear before them, to ask hard questions out of the Old Testament, and to call them familiarly by their last names. One day he was much startled, on asking about Dr. Gannett's salary, to hear that it was $3000, which would not now be regarded as a large sum, but seemed to him enormous. Why, Gannett, said tGannett, said the licensed veteran, what can a minister do with so much money? You can't know how to manage it! Gannett, you ought to have a guardeen! No doubt we are all ready, if we personally escape wealth, to offer advice as to its guardianship, but probaGannett, you ought to have a guardeen! No doubt we are all ready, if we personally escape wealth, to offer advice as to its guardianship, but probably the nearer we came to it, the greater the difficulty of deciding how to handle it. There is nothing new in the phenomenon, except in its lately rapid increase among ourselves. Even now it is said that no American is quite so rich as Cecil Rhode
of Col. Heck's command was that he was making his way through the mountains to join Gen. Garnett's forces, but as it was reported that Gen. Garnett had retired from Laurel Hill, and his position of destination unknown, it was uncertain when Col. Heck would join him. Col. Scott's regiment was said to be about forty miles from Staunton, and had been rein forced by several regiments, within the past few days. It was also reported that ten thousand of the Federal army were between Gen. Gannett's forces and the position held by Colonel Scott. Another account. On Thursday, about 3 o'clock, a battle took place between 250 Confederates against 4,000 Yankees. Our loss is supposed to be about 150 killed, wounded and missing; that of the enemy from 200 to 500. Mr. Houses, a member of the State Convention from Randolph county, was killed by ten balls shot through him. All of Capt. Iavin's company, from Buckingham, was killed, together with all of his officers, except Lt