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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 106 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 84 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 47 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 46 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 42 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for James A. Garfield or search for James A. Garfield in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

ween soldier and non-combatant, as expressed in bearing and cast of countenance. It is astonishing how accurately, after examining a number of the war photographs of every description, one may distinguish in From the army to the White House: Garfield in 1863—(left to right) Thomas, Wiles, Tyler, Simmons, Drillard, Ducat, Barnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential ChairGarfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major William McKinley, President, 1897-1901. many cases between fighters and non-combatants. This is true, even when the latter are represented in full army overcoats, with swords and the like, as was custo
le, and Hancock received the Second Corps, in May, 1863. At Gettysburg, Meade sent him to take charge on the first day, after Reynolds' death, and on the third day he himself was severely wounded. In March, 1864, he resumed command of the Second Corps. He took charge of the Department of West Virginia and Middle Military Division in March, 1865. After the war, he became major-general in 1866, and commanded various departments. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the presidency against Garfield. Of Hancock, General Grant once said: Hancock stands the most conspicuous figure of all the general officers who did not exercise a separate command. He commanded a corps longer than any other one, and his name was never mentioned as having committed in battle a blunder for which he was responsible. He died on Governor's Island, New York, February 9, 1886. Major-General Andrew Atkinson Humphreys (U. S.M. A. 1831) was born in Philadelphia, November 2, 1810. He was closely associate
itle applied to the troops under Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall, consisting of the militia of Wise, Scott and Lee counties, in 1861. It was a small force of about fifteen hundred men, and was scattered by Federal troops under Brigadier-General James A. Garfield. Its chief action was at Pound Gap, March 16, 1862. Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall (U. S.M. A. 1832) was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, January 13, 1812. He resigned from the army the year after his graduation and became. He entered the Confederate service, being made brigadier-general in October, 1861. At the head of a small force, sometimes called the Army of Eastern Kentucky, he undertook the conquest of that region, but was driven from it by Brigadier-General James A. Garfield in March, 1862. After this, he had several commands in Virginia and resigned from the service in June, 1863. He resumed his practice of law and was elected member of the Confederate Congress from Kentucky. He died in Louisville,
1, 1862. Buford, John, July 1, 1863. Buford, N. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Burnside, A. E., Mar. 18, 1862. Butler, Benj. F., May 16, 1861. Cadwalader, G. B., Apr. 25, 1862. Clay, Cassius M., April 11, 1862. Couch, Darius N., July 4, 1862. Cox, Jacob Dolson, Oct. 6, 1862. Crittenden, T. L., July 17, 1862. Curtis, S. R., Nov. 21, 1862. Dana, N. J. T., Nov. 29, 1862. Davies, Henry E., May 4, 1865. Dix, John A., May 16, 1861. Dodge, G. M., June 7, 1864. Doubleday, A., Nov. 29, 1862. Garfield, J. A., Sept. 19, 1863. Hamilton, C. S., Sept. 18, 1862. Hamilton, S., Sept. 17, 1862. Herron, F. J., Nov. 29, 1862. Hitchcock, E. A., Feb. 10, 1862. Federal generals—No. 25-Pennsylvania Samuel P. spear, originally Colonel of the 11th Cavalry. Roy Stone, commander of the Bucktail brigade. William A. Nichols, promoted for faithful service in the War. Israel Vodges, promoted for gallantry in the field. S. B. M. Young, originally Colonel 4th Cavalry; later commander o