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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Pettigrew's charge at Gettysburg. (search)
after a cordial greeting and a pleasant reference to our having been together in work of that kind at Chapultipec, expressed great confidence in the ability of our troops to drive the enemy after they had been demoralized by our artillery. General Garnett, who commanded his left brigade, having joined us, it was agreed that he would dress on my command. I immediately returned and informed General Pettigrew of this agreement. It was then understood that my command should be considered the ceed steadily on, and even when grape, canister, and musket balls began to rain upon it the gaps were quickly closed and the allignment preserved. Strong as was the position of the enemy, it seemed that such determination could not fail. I heard Garnett give a command to his men which, amid the rattle of musketry, I could not distinguish. Seeing my look or gesture of inquiry, he called out, I am dressing on you! A few seconds after he fell dead. A moment later — and after Captain Williams an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The death of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
l of Virginian cavaliers and dashing chieftain, whose name was a terror to the enemy, and familiar as a household word in two continents, is dead — struck down by a bullet from the foe, and the whole Confederacy mourns him. He breathed out his gallant spirit resignedly, and in the full possession of all his remarkable faculties of mind and body, at twenty-two minutes to eight o'clock Thursday night, at the residence of Dr. Brewer, a relative, on Grace street, in the presence of Drs. Brewer, Garnett, Gibson, and Fontaine, of the General's staff, Rev. Messrs. Peterkin and Kepler, and a circle of sorrow-stricken comrades and friends. We learn from the physicians in attendance upon the General, that his condition during the day was very changeable, with occasional delirium and other unmistakable symptoms of speedy dissolution. In the moments of delirium the General's mind wandered, and, like the immortal Jackson (whose spirit, we trust, his has joined), in the lapse of reason his facu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding and death of General J. E. B. Stuart-several errors corrected. (search)
your duty as I have done mine, and our country will be safe. Go back! go back! I had rather die than be whipped. * * I was hastening toward the part of the field where I heard he had been wounded, when I met the ambulance bringing him out. The General had so often told me that if he were wounded I must not leave the field, but report to the officer next to him in rank, that I did not now presume to disregard his order; and the more so, because I saw that Dr. Fontaine, Major Venable, Lieutenant Garnett, and several of his couriers, were attending him. I remained with General Fit. Lee until the next morning, when he sent me to the city to see General Bragg, and I had an opportunity to spend an hour with my General. More than any brother did I love him; greater loss I have never known. Thus closes the sad account from which we have copied, and as we read character it proves that the gay, dashing soldier possessed such worth as not only to attract, but to retain the affection of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hampton roads--Confederate official reports. (search)
s assigned to the command of the powder division — an important and complicated duty, which could not have been better performed. Surgeon Phillips and Assistant Surgeon Garnett were prompt and attentive in the discharge of their duties; their kind and considerate care of the wounded, and the skill and ability displayed in the trho came under their charge, and justly entitled them to the confidence of officers and crew. I beg leave to call the attention of the Department to the case of Dr. Garnett. He stands deservedly high in his profession, is at the head of the list of assistant surgeons, and there being a vacancy, in consequence of the recent death of Surgeon Blacknall, I should be much gratified if Dr. Garnett could be promoted to it. The engines and machinery, upon which so much depended, performed much better than was expected. This is due to the intelligence, experience and coolness of Acting Chief Engineer Ramsey. His efforts were ably seconded by his assistants, Tyn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Telegrams concerning operations around Richmond and Petersburg in 1864. (search)
ration of troops for an attack. G. T. Beauregard. near Petersburg, August 18th, 1864--10.15 A. M. General R. E. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: Following dispatch just received from General Dearing: Enemy has driven in my pickets and reserve in front of Yellow House. I am just going up with another regiment. Colonel Taliaferro reports them in force with infantry and cavalry. Can any cavalry reinforcements be sent him? I have none here. G. T. Beauregard. Petersburg, 18th August, 1864. Colonel Garnett, Commanding Hicksford: Enemy reported on railroad at Yellow House, both infantry and cavalry. Be on the alert. George William Brent, Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General. Same also to Colonel Armistead, Weldon. near Petersburg, 18th August, 1864--12 M. General R. E. Lee, Chaffin's Bluff: Artillery firing of this morning has developed nothing. General Dearing reported just now enemy is advancing in force, both upon railroad and Vaughan road. I have ordered two brigades of i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
st year, with the addition of General Bradley T. Johnson as one of the Vice-Presidents, were unanimously reelected. General Early presented a feeling and appropriate tribute to the memory of General John B. Hood, which was unanimously adopted, and ordered to be spread on the record. The banquet. After the speaking was over, the Association and their invited guests repaired to Levy's Hall, where a spendid banquet was spread, and eloquent and telling speeches were made in response to toasts by Colonel Charles S. Venable, Colonel John M. Patton, Jr., D. G. Tyler, of the old Rockbridge artillery; James N. Dunlop, of the old Fourth Virginia cavalry; Judge Theo. S. Garnett, Rev. Dr. J. E. Edwards, William Kean, of the old Richmond howitzers; Major J. Horace Lacy and others. As a specimen of the character of the speeches, and at the request of a number of comrades, we will give in full in our next number the speech of James N. Dunlop, Esq., in response to a toast to the cavalry.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative strength at Second Manassas. (search)
n to these commands of infantry, General Lee took two brigades (Drayton's and Evans'), recently arrived from South Corolina. The whole infantry force was organized, I believe, as follows: Longstreet's division.  Regts. Kemper's Brigade--First, Seventh, Eleventh, Seventeenth and Twenty-fourth Virginia regiments5 Jenkins' Brigade--First, Fifth and Sixth South Carolina regiments, Second South Carolina rifles, Palmetto Sharpshooters and Fourth South Carolina battalion5 1/2 Pickett's (or Garnett's) Brigade--Eighth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twenty-eighth and Fifty-sixth Virginia regiments5 Wilcox's Brigade--Eighth, Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh Alabama regiments4 Pryor's Brigade--Fifth and Eighth Florida, Third Virginia and Fourteenth Alabama regiments4 Featherstone's Brigade--Twelith, Sixteenth and Nineteenth Mississippi regiments, and Second Mississippi battalion3 1/2 D. R. Jones' division. Toombs' Brigade--Second, Fifteenth, Seventeenth and Twentieth Georgia regiments4 G. T. And
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
e, to their return to Culpeper Courthouse on the 27th day of July. The battalion of Lieutenant-Colonel Garnett was ordered to report to Major-General Heth, and Major Poague to Major-General Pender,back out of range. The battalions of Majors Lane and Poague, and Lieutenant-Colonels Cutts and Garnett were held in reserve, except Captain Maurin's battery of Garnett's battalion, which relieved onGarnett's battalion, which relieved one of Major Pegram's batteries, whose ammunition had been expended. On the 2d the battalions of Pegram, McIntosh, Lane and a part of Garnett's battalion under Major Richardson were put in position Garnett's battalion under Major Richardson were put in position on the right of the Fairfield turnpike, about one mile in advance of the position of the previous day, and later in the day Poague's battalion was also put in position still further to the right. Frdson for a detailed account of the detachment under his command. Two guns were captured of Colonel Garnett's battalion, which had been left behind after the teams had given out and before they could
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
utenant-Colonel Archer Anderson, Major Robert Stiles, Richmond; Colonel R. E. Withers, Wytheville; Colonel William Preston Johnston, Lexington; Colonel Thomas H. Carter, King William county; Colonel George W. Munford; Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel R. L. Maury, Captain A. M. Keiley, J. L. M. Curry, D. D., Moses D. Hoge, D. D., Rev. A. W. Weddell, Richmond; Colonel R. H. Dulaney, Loudon county; General Eppa Hunton, General Wm. H. Payne, Warrenton; General G. W. C. Lee, Lexington; Captain Theo. S. Garnett, Colonel Walter H. Taylor, Norfolk city; Major Charles S. Stringfellow, Petersburg. The constitution provides that members of the Executive Committee shall reside in Virginia, in order to have them convenient to the headquarters of the Society; but the vice-presidents of the several States, and, indeed, any individual members of the Society, would always be welcomed to the meetings of the Executive Committee, as well as to the general meetings of the Society. The committee wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
inia; Vice-President--Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Secretary and Treasurer--Rev. Dr. J. William Jones, Richmond, Va. Executive Committee--General D. H. Maury, chairman; Colonel Archer Anderson, Major Robt Stiles, Colonel George W. Munford, Colonel William H. Palmer, Colonel R. L. Maury, Captain A. M. Keiley, Rev. Dr. J. L. M. Curry, Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoge, Rev. Dr. A. W. Weddell, Major C. S. Stringfellow, and Rev. Dr. J. William Jones, of Richmond; Colonel Walter H. Taylor and Captain Theo. S. Garnett, of Norfolk; Colonel Thomas H. Carter, of King William county, Va.; Colonel R. E. Withers, of Wytheville; Colonel William Preston Johnston, of Baton Rouge,La.; Colonel R. H. Dulaney, of Loudoun county, Va.; General Eppa Hunton and General William H. Payne, of Warrenton, Va.; and General G. W. C. Lee, of Lexington, Va. Vice-Presidents of States--General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; Governor Z. B. Vance, of North Carolina; General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina; General A H. Colquitt
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