Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Garrett or search for Thomas Garrett in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
several men on whose heads tens of thousands of dollars had been set; a black woman, who, after escaping from slavery herself, had gone back secretly eight times into the jaws of death to bring out persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
several men on whose heads tens of thousands of dollars had been set; a black woman, who, after escaping from slavery herself, had gone back secretly eight times into the jaws of death to bring out persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a