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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
Sir Harry Vane, in my judgment the noblest human being who ever walked the streets of yonder city,--I do not forget Franklin or Sam Adams, Washington or Fayette, Garrison or John Brown, -but Vane dwells an arrow's flight above them all, and his touch consecrated the continent to measureless toleration of opinion and entire equalits and spleen, like poor wine, mellow into truth when they get to be a century old. But you might as well cite the Daily Advertiser of 1850 as authority on one of Garrison's actions. And, after all, of what value are these minutiae? Whether Luther's zeal was partly kindled by lack of gain from the sale of indulgences, whether Bodern constitutional governments, agitation is the only peaceful method of progress. Wilberforce and Clarkson, Rowland Hill and Romilly, Cobden and John Bright, Garrison and O'Connell, have been the master-spirits in this new form of crusade. Rarely in this country have scholarly men joined, as a class, in these great popular sc
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Daniel O'Connell (1875.) (search)
that ranks him, not with founders of States, like Alexander, Caesar, Bismarck, Napoleon, and William the Silent, but with men who, without arms, by force of reason, have revolutionized their times,--with Luther, Jefferson, Mazzini, Samuel Adams, Garrison, and Franklin. I know some men will sneer at this claim,--those who have never looked at him except through the spectacles of English critics, who despised him as an Irishman and a Catholic, until they came to hate him as a conqueror. As Gratt almost omnipotent landholders of England, and broke the Tory party forever. They only haunt upper air now in the stolen garments of the Whigs. The English administration recognizes this new partner in the government, and waits to be moved on. Garrison brought the new weapon to our shores. The only wholly useful and thoroughly defensible war Christendom has seen in this century, the greatest civil and social change the English race ever saw, are the result. This great servant and weapon, p
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Theodore Parker (1860). (search)
tform. It was the instinct of his nature, true as the bravest heart. The spot for him was where the battle was hottest. He had come, as half the clergy come,--a critic. He felt it was not his place; that it was to grapple with the tiger, and throttle him. And the pledge that he made he kept; for, whether here or in New York, as his reputation grew, when that lordly mammoth of the press, the Tribune, overgrown in its independence and strength, would not condescend to record a word that Mr. Garrison or I could utter, but bent low before the most thorough scholarship of New England, and was glad to win its way to the confidence of the West by being his mouthpiece,--with that weapon of influence in his right hand, he always placed himself at our side, and in the midst of us, in the capital State of the Empire. You may not think this great praise; we do. Other men have brought us brave hearts; other men have brought us keen-sighted and vigilant intellects,--but he brought us, as no o
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Francis Jackson (1861). (search)
Though enjoying but scanty opportunities of education in early life, he was thoroughly dowered by patient training, carefully gathered information, and most mature thought; he was in every sense a wise man, and wise men valued him. My friend Mr. Garrison has quoted Theodore Parker. All of you who knew Theodore Parker intimately will recollect that when he wished to illustrate cool courage, indomitable perseverance, sound sense, rare practical ability, utter disinterestedness, and spotless int and calmly leave to the immediate disposal of Omnipotence. Add to this quality of decision his other trait,--tireless activity,--and it explains his life. Indeed, he needs no words of ours: His own right hand was carved his epitaph. As Mr. Garrison has told us, he withdrew long ago from office,--stood outside of the political machine. But when history records the struggling birth of those changes and ideas which make our epoch and city famous, whose name will she put before his? And Go
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Helen Eliza Garrison (1876). (search)
Helen Eliza Garrison (1876). Remarks at the funeral services of Mrs. Garrison, 125 Highland Street, Roxbury, Thursday, January 27, 1876. How hard it is to let our friends go! We cling to them as if separation were separation forever; and yet, as life nears its end, and we tread the last years together, have we any right to be surprised that the circle grows narrow; that so many fall, one after another, at our side? Death seems to strike very frequently; but it is only the natural, ineMrs. Garrison, 125 Highland Street, Roxbury, Thursday, January 27, 1876. How hard it is to let our friends go! We cling to them as if separation were separation forever; and yet, as life nears its end, and we tread the last years together, have we any right to be surprised that the circle grows narrow; that so many fall, one after another, at our side? Death seems to strike very frequently; but it is only the natural, inevitable fate, however sad for the moment. Some of us can recollect, only twenty years ago, the large and loving group that lived and worked together; the joy of companionship, sympathy with each other,--almost our only joy, for the outlook was very dark, and our toil seemed almost vain. The world's dislike of what we aimed at, the social frown, obliged us to be all the world to each other; and yet it was a full life. The life was worth living; the labor was its own reward; we lacked nothin
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
Rev. Samuel May, p. 17, Memorial to Helen Eliza Garrison. sound body were evidently united in he On the first anniversary of his marriage Mr. Garrison thus wrote of his wife to her brother Georgll In a letter to his future father-in-law, Mr. Garrison wrote, May 31, 1834: Never shall I foneeded on the match between Miss Benson and Mr. Garrison, it was to be found in the character and hiBrief Account of his Ministry, p. 47; Helen Eliza Garrison: In Memoriam, pp. 7-15; Larned's Histoating Brooklyn from Pomfret. Nowhere could Mr. Garrison have found an atmosphere more congenial to de. As much stress will of course be laid on Garrison's wife by that class, it behooves me to be venemies of that race, accustomed to denounce Mr. Garrison as an amalgamationist, they were playfully ton after the last hourly had left, exposed Mr. Garrison to the risk of being waylaid by murderous egainst his host and backer, Arnold Buffum. Mr. Garrison's anxiety deepened as his suit prospered wi[4 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
etch of Mrs. Garrison, which was printed, with the addresses at the funeral and many tributes from friends, in a small volume for private presentation. Helen Eliza Garrison. A Memorial. 1876. While writing it, my head and heart were heavily oppressed, and in my enfeebled condition the task was as laborious as it was delicatenything of mental weakness to those into whose hands it will be put (Ms. March 30, 1876, W. L. G. to W. P. G.). The volume contains an excellent photograph of Mrs. Garrison. In June he visited Pennsylvania, and attended, for the 1876. last time, the Progressive Friends' Meetings at Longwood, with his usual active participatiocontributed two or three letters to the Presidential campaign. In Hayes-Tilden. June he received a note from Harriet Martineau, acknowledging the Memorial of Mrs. Garrison, and this was swiftly followed by the announcement of her own death, which it June 27, 1876. foreshadowed. He was deeply interested in the advance proofs of
spare dollar by me, using what economy I can, he said in the same letter; and to my mother (writing from Ohio the next Ms. Oct. 14, 1858. year), he spoke of being all the time pressed pecuniarily to keep out of debt—for debt is my dread, and yours not less. The more, by the way, he went afield as a lecturer, the greater the obligations of hospitality he incurred. One guest above all others had the freedom of our Ante, 3.478. home. I shall never forget, said Wendell Phillips at Helen E. Garrison, a Memorial, p. 40. my mother's funeral, the deep feeling—his voice almost breaking to tears—with which Henry C. Wright told me of the debt his desolate life owed to this home. And who shall say how much that served the great cause? Mr. Wright wrote to my parents in 1858—just after the financial panic: I have nowhere to take my things but Ms. Jan. 19, 1858. to your own home, which has so long been the centre of my life so far as a Home is concerned. . . . Your love and kindness to
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