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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
the causes for gratitude and thanksgiving, Mr. Garrison adds: Thus much for the favorable side had not been mistaken. Subsequently, when Mr. Garrison (accompanied by a friend) sought out his nese errand was as yet unknown to him. Before Mr. Garrison had spoken more than a few encouraging wordhich led to his own overwhelming defeat. Mr. Garrison's first visit to Boston, when on his way toght boots made the walk a most painful one to Garrison, and so fatiguing was it to the others that hin Gorham, a highly respectable lawyer; but Mr. Garrison, who had lost none of his admiration for Ha brief newspaper controversy ensued between Mr. Garrison and his opponent (who signed himself S.) in4th of March, 1826, the same month in which Mr. Garrison began his editorial career on the Free Presek. In the fifth month of his editorship Mr. Garrison published a series of three editorials on Fents on his letter, however, so exasperated Mr. Garrison that he wrote a second, of which this is th[40 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times—1828-29. Garrison edits this new paper in Bennington, Vt., in advocacy of the reelection of President John Quincy Adams, but also begins in ivery. Lundy visits him and engages him as associate editor of the genius. Returning to Boston, Garrison delivers an anti-slavery Fourth of July address at Park-St. Church, with a perfunctory approvaln removes to Baltimore. The exciting Presidential campaign of 1828 had already begun, when Mr. Garrison received an invitation from a committee of prominent citizens of Bennington, Vermont, who vis a very important town, the need of an Administration paper there was felt to be imperative. Mr. Garrison, while no very warm admirer of Mr. Adams personally, had still a well-founded dread of the elary to the usual habit of giving editorials larger type and better display than other matter, Mr. Garrison set his articles in smaller type than the average, and still found himself cramped for space.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
catastrophe; that he was inclined to think that Mr. Garrison would not be permitted to live long —that he wouand he added, that he had not the least doubt if Mr. Garrison were to go to the South, he would be dispatched ns at the South repeatedly. To the clergyman Mr. Garrison says: I thank him Lib. 1.145. for his friendllows (Ms.): New York, Sept. 12, 1831. Friend Garrison: As I see your life is threatened, I feel anxious ny other way. As usual in this fervent time, Mr. Garrison's feelings sought expression in verse, producingance been preserved. This information, commented Mr. Garrison, afflicts us less than the postage—six cents. dressed to the postmaster of that town, charging Mr. Garrison with publishing an incendiary paper, with the av outraged by the publication to which we refer. Mr. Garrison in vain sought a hearing in self-defence in the d not dispute. The desperate proposal, exclaims Mr. Garrison, caps the climax of Southern mendacity and folly
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
is Liberator. Finally, George Thompson, now Mr. Garrison's Ms. Nov. 10, 1834, to R. Purvis. neigh whom chiefly his own expenses were borne. Mr. Garrison had procured for both Englishmen the officis Lord Brougham, Edmund Quincy writes to Mr. Garrison from Boston, Aug. 10, 1838: I have just hearecipitated the irrepressible conflict, but Mr. Garrison's peculiar policy was to precipitate it. Inharge of want of patriotism. On this score Mr. Garrison's conscience was easy; witness part of his lose of the year, fresh expostulations with Mr. Garrison for his so-called harsh and sweeping languacles intended for the Liberator, and induce Mr. Garrison to promise to publish nothing there which s an unexceptionable paper, without injuring Mr. Garrison's interest? Would you be willing to aid inhe foregoing: When I saw how outrageously Garrison and some others Memoir, pp. 366, 367. werebe found in print. You are correct, writes Mr. Garrison to G. W. Benson, Sept, 4, 1835; those relig[40 more...]