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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Merrill E. Gates or search for Merrill E. Gates in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
Fishing Creek, action at. When General Gates was approaching Camden in 1780 he sent General Sumter with a detachment to intercept a convoy of stores passing from Ninety-six to Rawdon's camp at Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and hislothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French West Indies, the (search)
French West Indies, the Canada conquered, the British turned their arms against the French West India Islands, in which the colonies participated. Gaudeloupe had already been taken. General Monckton, after submitting his commission as governor to the council of New York, sailed from that port (January, 1762), with two line-of-battle ships, 100 transports, and 1,200 regulars and colonial troops. Major Gates (afterwards adjutant-general of the Continental army) went with Monckton as aide-de-camp, and carried to England the news of the capture of Martinique. Richard Montgomery (afterwards a general in the Continental army) held the rank of captain in this expedition. The colonial troops were led by Gen. Phineas Lyman. Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent's—indeed, every island in the Caribbean group possessed by the French-fell into the hands of the English. The French fleet was ruined, and French merchantmen were driven from the seas. British vessels, including those of New
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frost, John 1800-1859 (search)
Frost, John 1800-1859 Author; born in Kennebunk, Me., Jan. 26, 1800; graduated at Harvard in 1822; was the author of History of the world; Pictorial history of the United States; Book of the army; Book of the Navy, etc. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 28, 1859. Soldier; born in Kittery, Me., May 5, 1738; was a captain of colonial troops in the Canadian campaign of 1759, and lieutenant-colonel at the siege of Boston in 1775. In 1776 he was promoted to colonel and served under General Gates until Burgoyne's surrender, when he was ordered to Washington's army and participated in the battle of Monmouth and other engagements. After the close of the war he was appointed judge of the court of sessions for York county. Me. He died in Kittery, Me., in July, 1810.