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of Fort Sumter was continued and finally reduced to a ruin, although not captured by the Nationals. Six hundred and four shots were fired at the Fort during the day, of which four hundred and nineteen struck inside and outside. The east wall was crushed and breached so that the shot swept through the Fort, the parapet was undermined, the north-west wall knocked down, and all the guns dismounted.--(See Supplement.) A detachment of the Twelfth Pennsylvania cavalry, under command of Captain Gerry, were ordered by Acting Brigadier-General L. B. Pierce on a reconnaissance from Martinsburgh, Va. Going to Bunker Hill, and thence to Leetown, they encountered the enemy, and captured a number of the rebel Gillmore's men, one lieutenant and one horse, and returned to camp this afternoon without loss. No attention having been paid to General Gillmore's demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter, and other rebel works in Charleston harbor, heavy rifled shells were thrown into Charleston,
se they know well that the first clash between the State and Federal muskets — the first drop of blood that collision spills — will enkindle a flame that will light them on to the accomplishment of their foul, hellish purposes of blood and carnage. This class would, in a mere spirit of adventure, fire the very temples of liberty, and dash into fragments that proudest and noblest monument of human wisdom — the union of these States--the handiwork of Washington, and Franklin, and Madison, and Gerry, and Morris, and comrade conscript fathers — under which we have been the proudest, freest, happiest, greatest nation on the face of the earth. This class does exist in Virginia. It exists all over the civilized earth, and it is no detraction from Virginia to say that it exists within her domain; she would be an exception to all human society, if she did not hold in her bosom such a class. Now all this class will be stimulated by the passage of these revolutionary, and force-inviting, an
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter I (search)
f Stephen A. Douglas restoration to Cadet duty James B. McPherson John B. Hood Robert E. Lee. I was born in the town of Gerry, Chautauqua County, New York, September 29, 1831. My father was the Rev. James Schofield, who was then pastor of the Baptist Church in Sinclairville, and who was from 1843 to 1881 a home missionary engaged in organizing new churches, and building meeting-houses, in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. My mother was Caroline McAllister, daughter of John McAllister of Gerry. We removed to Illinois in June, 1843, and, after a short stay in Bristol, my father made a new home for his family in Freeport, where he began his missionary work by founding the First Baptist Church of that place. In all my childhood and youth I had what I regard as the best possible opportunities for education, in excellent public schools where the rudiments of English were taught with great thoroughness, in a fair amount of all kinds of manly sports, and in hard work, mainly on the
watch is running down. Wadsworth's stem-winding watch. In Wadsworth's stem-winding watch, by the arrangement of the bar carrying the gears, the main-spring can be wound by turning the pendant, whether the case is open or closed. To set the hands, the bar is first pressed inward to establish the necessary connection between them and the pendant, and disconnect the pendant and main-spring, and then, by turning, regulate the hands. See also patents to Smith and Folsom, 1873; Rice and Gerry, 1868; Jacob, 1869; Himmer, 1869. Stench-traps. Stench-trap. A depression in a drain in which water collects, to prevent the reflex passage of air. The figure shows various forms for sinks and pipes. See also water-closet. Sten′cil. A thin plate out of which patterns or letters have been cut. The plate being laid on the object, the pattern is made thereon by brushing on the color. In early times playing-cards were thus made. Chatto, in his History of playing-cards, Londo
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 41: the march to the sea; capture of Fort McAllister and Savannah (search)
epared light fascines of twigs and of straw in plenty to fill the ditches before our assaulting columns, and were ready with every modern device to accomplish our purpose; but I am glad indeed that the Confederate authorities agreed with Hardee to save their garrison and withdraw it in season. A long detention would have been unfavorable to us in the opening of our next campaign. There was a little contention, a sort of friendly rivalry, as to what troops had gone first into Savannah. Gerry's division of Slocum's army at last carried off the palm. General Sherman took up his headquarters with an English gentleman, Mr. Charles Green, who had very generously tendered his home for this purpose. Sherman had hardly reached the city and become settled in his temporary home before he sent to Mr. Lincoln the dispatch which was so widely published, viz.: Savannah, Ga., December 22, 1864. To His Excellency, President Lincoln, Washington, D. C. I beg to present to you as a Christm
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
excellent imitation of Miss Kemble's acting. With another daughter, then quite a young girl, he talked much concerning her studies, and afterwards sought, by his letters, to foster her literary inclinings. Her vivid recollections of him, as he appeared at this period, find a place in this chapter. His father wrote to him, while he was in Washington, a letter as stately as it was paternal, sending a friendly message to Governor Lincoln, enjoining upon his son to visit the grave of Vice-president Gerry, and also that of William Wirt who had died Feb. 18, and ending with macte virtute, puer. His brother Henry and his sister Mary added playful postscripts to the father's letter. Professor Greenleaf gratefully acknowledged his reports of his visit to Chancellor Kent and of life in Washington. One of the daughters of Mr. Peters thus describes him at this time:— It was somewhere about 1832 I think, in the summer-time, that Charles Sumner led me—then a little girl—and my fathe<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ver he went. Still further enraged at what he ought to have expected, he actually sent a regular and ample memoir to the prorector, and fled the city. The moment the fact was known, or rather suspected, such a sensation was excited as no one can imagine who did not witness it. There was no tumult or violence, but the whole appearance of the city was changed. The streets, always before filled only with young men hastening to their lectures, were now crowded with little assemblages, as Gov. Gerry would call them, so that it was difficult to pass on the sidewalks; the benches in the lecture-rooms, where a vacant seat was a rarity, grew visibly thin and empty, and wherever you met a student he had the hurried and anxious air of a man of business. The whole character of things was altered. The first determination was to have personal vengeance on the traitor. Guards were posted on the roads to prevent his escape; for two nights a watch of three hundred patrolled the ramparts and t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lee circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 22, 1884. (search)
ve ratified the same. The same doctrine likewise appears in the ordinances of ratification of several of the States, in the debates of the convention itself, and in those of the various State conventions-denied only by the opponents of the Constitution, always affirmed by its friends. It is repeatedly and explicitly proclaimed in the Federalist. It appears in the writings and utterances of all the fathers of the Constitution, of Hamilton as well as of Madison, of Washington, Franklin, Gerry, Wilson, Morris, of those who favored as well as those who feared a strong government. It is emphatically announced, not only in the extreme Kentucky resolutions, but in the famous Virginia resolutions of 1798, the first from the pen of Jefferson, the last from that of Madison, the latter of which declared that they viewed the powers of the Federal government as resulting from the compact to which the States were parties. These resolutions formed thereafter the corner stone of the great St
, yeoman, h. Milk. Fultz, Joseph, blacksmith, h. Elm. Fulsom, Benjamin W., furniture dealer, Lime. Fullick, G. K., painter, h. Bow. Garrett, Robert, h. Beacon. Galletly, James, twine manufacturer, h. Cambridge. Gates, William, provision dealer, h. cor. Cambridge and Dane. Gay, Francis C., milk dealer, h. Walnut. Gay, John, blacksmith, h. Linden. Garven, Thomas, rope-maker, h. Milk. Garven, Edward. laborer, h. Milk. Gerrish, Samuel, blacksmith, h. Porter. Gerry, John W., b. blacksmith, Linden. Gerrish, Samuel, b. clothing, h. Porter. Gill, Samuel W., b. letter cutter, h. Garden court. Gilbert, Henry, b. merchant, h. Summer. Giles, John B., marble worker, h. Cambridge. Gilman, Charles E., town clerk, h. Walnut. Glines, Jacob T., brickmaker, Derby. Goodhue, Homer, supervisor, McLean Asylum. Goodnow, John, b. merchant at E. F. Cutter's. Goodhue, Thomas F. H., market, h. Bow. Gooding, Samuel H., b. brass founder, h. Joy.
e they know well that the first clash between the State and Federal muskets — the first drop of blood that collision spills — will enkindle a flame that will light them on to the accomplishment of their foul, hellish purposes of blood and carnage.-- This class would, in a mere spirit of adventure, fire the very temples of Liberty, and dash into fragments that proudest and noblest monument of human wisdom — the Union of these States--the handiwork of Washington, and Franklin, and Madison, and Gerry, and Morris, and comrade conscript fathers — under which we have been the proudest, freest, happiest, greatest nation on the face of the earth. This class does exist in Virginia. It exists all over the civilized earth, and it is detraction from Virginia to say that it exists within her domain; she would be an exception to all human society, if she did not hold in her bosom such a class. Now all this class will be stimulated by the passage of these revolutionary, and force inviting, and l
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