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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gibbon, John -1896 (search)
Gibbon, John -1896 Military officer; born near Holmesburg, Pa., April 20, 1827; graduated at West Point in 1847; served to the close of the Mexican War in the artillery. During the Civil War he was chief of artillery to General McDowell till May, 1862, when he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers. His brigade was in constant service, and Gibbon was soon promoted colonel, U. S. A., and major-general, U. S. V. He took part in the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and Petersbur War in the artillery. During the Civil War he was chief of artillery to General McDowell till May, 1862, when he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers. His brigade was in constant service, and Gibbon was soon promoted colonel, U. S. A., and major-general, U. S. V. He took part in the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. He received the brevet of major-general, U. S. A., March 13, 1865. He published The artillerist's manual. He died in Baltimore, Md., Feb. 6, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 (search)
nians. The King had heard and believed that the Boston clergy preached toleration for all kinds of immoralities for the sake of liberty, and scores of other tales, which Hutchinson did not deny; and for two hours the conversation went on, until the King was satisfied that Boston would be unsupported in its rebellious attitude by the other colonies. The author of this intelligence, says Bancroft, became at once a favorite, was offered the rank of a baronet, and was consulted as an oracle by Gibbon, the historian, and other politicians at court. Boston tea party. In his history of Massachusetts Bay, Governor Hutchinson gives the following account of the destruction of tea in Boston Harbor: The Assembly being prorogued, there was again room to hope for a few months of freedom from civil contention. The complaint against the governor was gone to England; the salaries of the judges were suspended for the consideration of the next session: these were the two subjects of controv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Robert Edward 1807- (search)
perty, will be allowed to retain them. Fifth. The surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia shall be construed to include all the forces operating with that army on the 8th instant, the date of the commencement of the negotiations for surrender, except such bodies of cavalry as actually made their escape previous to the surrender; and except, also, such pieces of artillery as were more than 20 miles from Appomattox Court-house at the time of surrender on the 9th instant. (Signed) John Gibbon, Major-General Volunteers. Charles Griffin, Brevet Major-General U. S. V. M. Merritt, Brevet Major-General. J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General. J. B. Gibbon, Major-General. W. N. Pendleton, Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery. The following is a copy of the parole signed by General Lee and his staffofficers: We, the undersigned, prisoners of war belonging to the Army of Northern Virginia, having been this day surrendered by Gen. R. E. Lee, commanding said army, to Lieut