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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
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t. On the evening of the 10th he sent to Ewell this message: It will be necessary for you to reestablish your whole line to-night .. . Perhaps Grant will make a night attack, as it was a favorite amusement of his at Vicksburg. Through rain and mud Hancock's force was gotten into position within a few hundred yards of the Confederate breast-works. He was now between Burnside and Wright. At the first approach of dawn the four divisions of the Second Corps, under Birney, Mott, Barlow, and Gibbon (in reserve) moved noiselessly to the designated point of attack. Without a shot being fired they reached the Confederate entrenchments, and struck with fury and impetuosity a mortal blow at the point where least expected, on the salient, held by General Edward Johnson of Ewell's corps. The movement of the Federals was so swift and the surprise so complete, that the Confederates could make practically no resistance, and were forced to surrender. The artillery had been withdrawn from the
elf but six miles from the outworks of Richmond, while the Chickahominy cut off any further flanking movement. There was nothing to do but fight it out, and Grant ordered an attack all along the line. On June 3d he hurled the Army of the Potomac against the inferior numbers of Lee, and in a brave assault upon the Confederate entrenchments, lost ten thousand men in twenty minutes. Grant's assault at Cold Harbor was marked by the gallantry of General Hancock's division and of the brigades of Gibbon and Barlow, who on the left of the Federal line charged up the ascent in their front upon the concentrated artillery of the Confederates; they took the position and held it for a moment under a galling fire, which finally drove them back, but not until they had captured a flag and three hundred prisoners. The battle was substantially over by half-past 7 in the morning, but sullen fighting continued throughout the day. About noontime General Grant, who had visited all the corps commanders to
d to shut the Confederate right into the city. General Parke, with the Ninth Corps, carried the main line. The thin gray line could no longer stem the tide that was engulfing it. The Confederate troops south of Hatcher's Run fled to the west, and fought General Miles until General Sheridan and a division from Meade appeared on the scene. By noon the Federals held the line of the outer works from Fort Gregg to the Appomattox. The last stronghold carried was Fort Gregg, at which the men of Gibbon's corps had one of the most desperate struggles of the war. The Confederates now fell back to the inner fortifications and the siege of Petersburg came to an end. Appomattox View of field artillery In the wake of Lee's retreat the ruins of railroad bridge at Petersburg April, 1865 The scene that met the eyes of the Union cavalry on April 3d. The ashes of a bridge, locomotive, train and all, as they had fallen the day before on the gravelly shore of the Appotomax. When
to the inner works. The whole corps penetrated the lines and swept everything before it toward Hatcher's Run. Some of the troops even reached the South Side Railroad, where the brave General A. P. Hill fell mortally wounded. Everywhere, the blue masses poured into the works. General Ord, on the right of the Sixth Corps, helped to shut the Confederate right into the city. General Parke, with the Ninth Corps, carried the main line. The thin gray line could no longer stem the tide that was engulfing it. The Confederate troops south of Hatcher's Run fled to the west, and fought General Miles until General Sheridan and a division from Meade appeared on the scene. By noon the Federals held the line of the outer works from Fort Gregg to the Appomattox. The last stronghold carried was Fort Gregg, at which the men of Gibbon's corps had one of the most desperate struggles of the war. The Confederates now fell back to the inner fortifications and the siege of Petersburg came to an end.
till, and then the band, With movement light and tricksy, Made stream and forest, hill and strand, Reverberate with ‘Dixie.’ Illustrations of Thompson's poem: taken during the battle of May 3, 1863. These two views, the lower being the right half of the panorama, are a truly remarkable illustration of Thompson's lines. ‘Taken during the battle of May 3, 1863’ is the legend written on the print by the Government photographer, Captain A. J. Russell. In the early morning of that day, Gibbon had encrimsoned the stream at this point in crossing the river to cooperate with Sedgwick to attack the Confederate positions on the heights of Fredericksburg. When this picture was taken, Sedgwick was some nine miles away, fighting desperately along a crest near Salem Chapel, from which he was at length driven slowly back through the woods. Sedgwick held his ground through the next day; but on the night of May 4th he recrossed the Rappahannock, this time above Fredericksburg, while the C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
r-widening gap between the two lines, as, pivoting on his right division, under Gibbon, he swung forward his left. Ib. Yet Mott's division had come into position on Gibbon's left, and had commenced entrenching, and Barlow was moving up to the left of Mott, when suddenly and swiftly, with a wild yell which rang out shrill and fierck, the woods still reverberating with their fierce clamor, stormed and carried Gibbon's entrenchments and seized his guns. When night came down the victors return. Lee was forced back from the whole line covering the Boydton Plank Road, and Gibbon's division of Ord's corps boldly essayed to break through into the town. The wolinians of Lane's brigade, and a score of artillerymen, in all 250 men. Thrice Gibbon's columns, above 5,000 strong, surged against the devoted outpost — thrice they to the too eager enemy for the remainder of the day, for nearly six hundred of Gibbon's men lay dead and stricken in front of the work, and the most daring of the as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of Fort Gregg. (search)
they were awaiting their discharge papers to enable them to go to their homes. If Captain Chew was in the fort at all, he was simply there as a volunteer or a spectator. We should give the honor to those who earned it in this fierce fight of three hours against such fearful odds. Swinton, in his Army of the Potomac, in his description of the breaking through the lines on this historic Sunday, says: On reaching the lines immediately around Petersburg, a part of Ord's command under Gibbon began an assault directed against Fort Gregg and Whitworth, two strong enclosed works, the most salient and commanding south of Petersburg. The former of these redoubts was manned by Harris' Mississippi brigade, numbering two hundred and fifty men, and this handful of skilled marksmen conducted the defence with such intrepidity that Gibbons' force, surging repeatedly against it, was each time thrown back; at length a renewed charge carried the work, but not till its two hundred and fifty de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battery Gregg-reply to General N. H. Harris. (search)
battery, but they both say they were without organization; the former says, to be exact, There may have been good and true men from other commands who aided in the defence. General Mahone was requested, though not present, to write of the defence of the battery. Not being there, he could only repeat what he had heard. Lieutenant-Colonel Owens, Washington artillery, can't see what General Lane had to do with Gregg, as he had always understood that the fort was held by Mississippians. General Gibbon, of the Union army, was invited to express an opinion as to the composition of the command. He regretted he could give no information in regard to the garrison of the fort. It will be seen that General Harris was industrious in beating up evidence — writing to those who were not present, as well as to those of the other side. He could not accept my statement of the case, though present and having control of the whole affair. I have omitted, unintentionally, up to this point, refere
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
mity of the enemy, was marching down the pike with only a small advanced guard and a few skirmishers in front. The brigades were in the following order: Hatch's, Gibbon's, Doubleday's, Patrick's. The action which now ensued was somewhat remarkable in several features. It was fought principally by the brigadiers on each side. n unfinished railroad, stretching from near Sudley's Ford toward Gainesville. The fighting, meanwhile, had ceased. The notable part of this action was fought by Gibbon's brigade of three Wisconsin regiments, and one Indiana reenforced by two regiments of Doubleday's,—the 56th Pa. and the 76th N. Y.,— in all about 3000 men. Oppos two majors, and over 200 men, killed and wounded. Taliaferro's brigade lost a lieutenant-colonel and two majors. Its other casualties were probably about 100. Gibbon's brigade, out of 2300 men, lost about 750, and Doubleday's two regiments, about 800 strong, lost about 350. Hatch's brigade, from the front, and Patrick's from
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
imble, Early, Hays7 Hill, A. P.Branch, Archer, Gregg, Pender, Field, Thomas7 JacksonWinder, Jones, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPendleton's Reserve, 58 Guns12 CavalryStuartHampton, Lee F., Robertson, 14 Guns3 Aggregate2 Corps, 10 Divisions43 Brigades, 284 guns, 55,000 Men67 CORPSDIVISIONSBRIGADESBATTS. 1st CorpsKingPhelps, Doubleday, Patrick, Gibbon4 HookerRickettsDuryea, Christian, Hartsuff2 MeadeSeymour, Magilton, Gallagher4 2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Fe
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