Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Joshua Giddings or search for Joshua Giddings in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 2 document sections:

Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
sure in recognizing one exception to my remarks, Mr. Giddings. Perhaps he is no real exception, since it woulPalfrey and Mann, Chase and Hale, and Phillips and Giddings? Who taught the Christian Register, the Daily Advt, I was a man before I was a Commissioner, when Mr. Giddings says of the fall of slavery, quoting Adams, Let ction, not in what capacity the deed is done. Mr. Giddings is more careful in his statement; but, judged by exists anywhere, and I doubt not Mr. Sumner and Mr. Giddings feel themselves enlisted for the whole war. I winder clause construed away. But even then, does Mr. Giddings or Mr. Sumner really believe that slavery, existrefused to sanction this doctrine of his friend, Mr. Giddings, combating it ably and eloquently in his well-knlays down has many other applications. But is Mr. Giddings willing to sit down with slaveholders, like a badd something equal to the slave's side. But no, Mr. Giddings is content to give the slaveholder the irresisti
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 20 (search)
We put five hundred thousand men on the banks of the Potomac. Virginia is held by two races, white and black. Suppose those black men flare in our faces the Declaration of Independence. What are we to say? Are we to send Northern bayonets to keep slaves under the feet of Jefferson Davis? [Many voices, No! Never! ] In 1842, Governor Wise of Virginia, the symbol of the South, entered into argument with Quincy Adams, who carried Plymouth Rock to Washington. [Applause.] It was when Joshua Giddings offered his resolution stating his constitutional doctrine that Congress had no right to interfere, in any event, in any way, with the slavery of the Southern States. Plymouth Rock refused to vote for it. Mr. Adams said (substantially): If foreign war comes, if civil war comes, if insurrection comes, is this beleaguered capital, is this besieged government, to see millions of its subjects i-arms, and have no right to break the fetters which they are forging into swords? No; the war p