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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
ng the construction of batteries and other works. Lieut. Col. James Oakes, inspector of cavalry and commander of the regular cavalry, was capable and zealous, though suffering greatly from shattered health. The other members of my staff, Capt. C. C. Gilbert and Capt. H. C. Bankhead, inspectors of infantry, and Lieuts. C. L. Fitzhugh, A. F. Rockwell, and T. J. Bush, aides-de-camp, are all entitled to commendation for the intelligent and efficient manner in which they discharged their appropriamy brigade in front of General Wood's division, I proceeded with the four regiments composing the brigade to Driver's house. Here I was joined by a battery of artillery and a squadron of cavalry from General Wood's division. Accompanied by Captains Gilbert and Gillem, of General Buells staff, and several other officers, I rode forward and looked at the situation. I then ordered forward the brigade to a high, open ridge immediately in front of Generals Wood's and Sherman's divisions. Placing
er, Companies B, C, and D, First Infantry, Capts. Gilbert, Plummer, and Huston, with one company of battle: Capt. Plummer, First Infantry; Capt. Gilbert, First Infantry; Capt. Huston, First Infanr. Soon after the fall of Gen. Lyon, Capt. C. C. Gilbert, First Infantry, joined my battalion wi upon the enemy without support, although Captain Gilbert suggested it. During this suspension ont. I also mention the First Sergeant of Captain Gilbert's company, Mandrazz, who was killed in thcal state of the combat, I conferred with Captain Gilbert, whose intelligence and soldierly qualitites infantry, commanded by Capts. Plummer and Gilbert. Notwithstanding the galling fire poured oen we halted for two hours, at which time Captain Gilbert's company of regulars and Major Osterhauslves behind a fence. Captain Plummer and Captain Gilbert, with their companies, marched close up temain behind the fence. Captains Plummer and Gilbert's companies of regulars were then ordered to [2 more...]
-arms took place here. The opposing force was a body of regular United States infantry, commanded by Capts. Plummer and Gilbert. Notwithstanding the galling fire poured on these two regiments, they leaped over the fence, and gallantly led by thegfield about eight o'clock P. M., marching slowly along until two A. M., when we halted for two hours, at which time Captain Gilbert's company of regulars and Major Osterhaus' battalion were thrown out as skirmishers on either side of the column, anrce which was operating against Captain Wright's cavalry, sheltering themselves behind a fence. Captain Plummer and Captain Gilbert, with their companies, marched close up to the fence and delivered an effective fire, but were compelled by great oded this movement three times, but the enemy were too wily, and would only remain behind the fence. Captains Plummer and Gilbert's companies of regulars were then ordered to attack them in the corn-field, which they did, and were driven back from th
indebted for his unremitting attention to the wounded. I feel confident that we inflicted a severe loss on the enemy, as several bodies were seen on the ground, and many seen to fall. I also enclose Lieut. Commanding Shirk's report. Hoping that my course will meet your approbation, I have the honor to be, etc., Wm. Gwin, Lieut. Commanding. Flag-Officer A. H. Foote. The report of Acting-Surgeon Thomas H. Kearney states the casualties as follows: On the gunboat Tyler.--Pleasant Gilbert, seaman, gunshot wound of leg, necessitating amputation of the limb; Crawford T. Hill, seaman, gunshot wound of forearm; John Matthews, seaman, gunshot (flesh) wound of shoulder, slight; G. W. Shull, seaman, gunshot wound of back, slight; Robt. Bell, seaman, gunshot wound of arm (flesh) and chest, not penetrating. In detachment of Thirty-second regiment of Illinois Volunteers (company C) carried on board.--Capt. Phillips, gunshot wound of leg, flesh; Daniel Messick, orderly sergeant, kil
ese companies during the thirty-six hours of unremitted exposure and exertion. Col. John Groesbeck's report. headquarters First brigade, First division, District of the Mississippi. New-Madrid, Mo., March 15, 1862. Captain: I have the honor to report to the General commanding the First division the part taken in the late action before New-Madrid by the brigade under my command, consisting of the Twenty-seventh and Thirty-ninth regiments Ohio infantry, under Col. Fuller and Lieut.-Col. Gilbert, respectively. On the afternoon of the twelfth inst. I detailed companies A and F, Twenty-seventh, and I and H, Thirty-ninth Ohio, under command of Lieutenant-Col. Kennett, Twenty-seventh Ohio, to drive in the pickets of the enemy, hold an advanced position, and cover the parties detailed to plant our heavy artillery. He drove in the pickets and took the position assigned him within eight hundred yards of the enemy's gunboats and principal fort. At three o'clock on the morning
The reconnoissance during the night, and the early patrols of the morning, revealed the enemy retiring, and Gen. Heintzelman in person ordered into the enemy's works (which our pickets of the One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania regiment, under Lieut. Gilbert, were entering with Gen. Jameson) the Fourth Maine regiment to erect thereon its standard and take possession in full force. I have to mark out for the high commendation of the General-in-Chief Gens. Jameson, Birney, and Berry, whose soldiertitude, to the success of those more immediately engaged, and would have formed a means of subduing all opposition should the enemy have resisted on the following day. A picket of one hundred and twelve men of the One Hundred and Fifth, under Lieut. Gilbert, were the first to enter the enemy's works, followed by the Fourth Maine, of Gen. Birney's brigade. Col. A. A. McKnight, One Hundred and Fifth Pennsylvania, Col. Alexander Hays, Sixty-third, and C. T. Campbell, Fifty-seventh, are in my fir
r to report that in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'cloc We found the engagement still progressing. By Gen. Gilbert's written order, the command was to go accordingon with Louisville, and immediately telegraphed General Gilbert in substance that we had held the enemy, said turther proceedings. I at once telegraphed Brigadier-General Gilbert in substance that I had so relinquished the from subsequent events whether my telegram to General Gilbert was such evidence of weakness as justified my r N. B.--It is probably but just both to Major-General Gilbert and myself to add that, since my arrival in ut of his neck, lacerating his face dreadfully. Col. Gilbert, of the Thirty-ninth Ohio, acquitted himself brae became frightened, plunged violently and threw Col. Gilbert upon his head. He was insensible two hours and enth Ohio, Major. Spalding; Thirty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Gilbert; Forty-third Ohio, Colonel Thos. Kirby Smith; S
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
ky: sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of turned and fired upon them. We found the engagement still progressing. By Gen. Gilbert's written order, the command was to go according to seniority, and I being tgot telegraphic communication with Louisville, and immediately telegraphed General Gilbert in substance that we had held the enemy, said to be Bragg's and Polk's wholder who has reported the further proceedings. I at once telegraphed Brigadier-General Gilbert in substance that I had so relinquished the command, and that I shoulroper authorities must judge from subsequent events whether my telegram to General Gilbert was such evidence of weakness as justified my removal from command, or wheates Forces at Green River. N. B.--It is probably but just both to Major-General Gilbert and myself to add that, since my arrival in this city, he has informed
t was continued. The centre corps, under General Gilbert, moved in the direct road from Springfielpprehension about my right, as it rested near Gilbert's left. A fierce onset being made on Terrell column. Captain Fisher then reported to General Gilbert that my entire command was engaged, that ision on the road, to a point designated by Gen. Gilbert, when I formed my brigades as follows: the ooding's (Thirtieth) brigade was ordered by Gen. Gilbert to advance to the aid of General McCook, upn that point. I then, by direction of Major-General Gilbert, reoccupied the crest of the hill. I as moving steadily up in full view of where Gen. Gilbert's army corps had been during the day, the lP. M., I received orders directly from Major-General Gilbert, Commanding Third corps d'armee, to pral Sheridan's division had the advance in General Gilbert's corps, Rousseau's and Jackson's divisiond is situated to the right of the turnpike, (Gilbert's corps being upon the left,) and when occupi[13 more...]
Doc. 52.-Morgan's rebel raid. Colonel Hoskins's report. headquarters Post Lebanon, Ky., January 6, 1863. Brigadier-General C. C. Gilbert, Commanding Tenth Division Army of the Cumberland. General: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations before Lebanon, commencing on the twenty-sixth of December, 1862, at which time I was notified by Brig.-Gen. Boyle by telegram that the rebel Morgan was again in our State, and ending on the second of January, 1863, at which time the pursuit of him was abandoned by order of Brig.-Gen. Speed S. Fry three miles beyond Columbia. At the time I received notice of Morgan's invasion of the State and movements in the direction of Bardstown or Lebanon, I had under my command the Seventh Tennessee, consisting of two hundred and fifty-eight men; Twelfth Kentucky infantry, consisting of four hundred and twenty-five men; and Sixteenth Kentucky infantry, six hundred and fifty. I was informed by the Post-Quartermaster that he had
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