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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for L. J. Gilmartin or search for L. J. Gilmartin in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
th was assigned to duty in the military district of Georgia, with orders to report to Gen. A. R. Lawton, April 10th. The United States land forces participating in the reduction of Fort Pulaski were under Maj.-Gen. David Hunter and Brigadier-Generals Benham, Viele and Gillmore. Within the walls of Fort Pulaski, under the command of Col. Charles H. Olmstead, were a little over 400 men of the Savannah regiment, or First regiment of Georgia, the companies being the Montgomery Guard, Capt. L. J. Gilmartin; German Volunteers, Capt. John H. Steigen; Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. T. W. Sims; Wise Guard, Capt. M. J. McMullen; Washington Volunteers, Capt. John McMahon. The armament of the fort was five 10-inch and nine 8-inch columbiads, three 42-pounders, three 10-inch mortars, one 12-inch mortar, one 24-pounder and two 12-pounder howitzers, twenty 32-pounders and two 4-inch Blakely rifled guns. The fight went against the fort from the first, but there was great faith in the strength