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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Jeremy Francis Gilmer or search for Jeremy Francis Gilmer in all documents.

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ever, to be held by more men than General Branch had under his command, so on the approach of General Burnside with his land and naval forces, all fortifications below Fort Thompson were abandoned. The works behind which the Confederates fought extended from Fort Thompson (13 guns) on the Neuse to a swamp on the Weathersby road, a distance of two and a half miles. From the fort to the railroad, a distance of one mile, were posted, beginning at the fort, the Twenty-seventh North Carolina, Major Gilmer; the Thirty-seventh, Colonel Lee; the Seventh, Colonel Campbell; the Thirty-fifth, Colonel Sinclair, and a battalion of militia under Colonel Clark. Across the railroad, for a mile and a half, the only forces were the Twenty-sixth North Carolina, Colonel Vance; two dismounted companies of the Second cavalry, and one unattached company of infantry, and to the right of these two pieces of Brem's Not Harding's, as Battles and Leaders has it. battery under Lieutenant Williams. Between th
down which the Confederates had to advance. As General Cooke marched to the attack, his Carolina regiments were drawn up as follows: The Forty-sixth, Colonel Hall, on the right; the Fifteenth, Col. William MacRae, next; the Twenty-seventh, Colonel Gilmer, next, and on the left, the Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup. General Kirkland's North Carolinians were on Cooke's left in this order: The Eleventh, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Fifty-second, Lieut.-Col. B. F. Little, were on the left; the ders were to break it if possible. The batteries speedily got their range and the infantry fire was incessant. As they fired up the hill, says Capt. J. A. Graham, every one of their shots told. Almost at the first volley, General Cooke and Colonel Gilmer were seriously wounded. Col. E. D. Hall succeeded to the command of the brigade. Colonel Hall, seeing how rapidly his command was falling, rushed to the center and ordered the firing to cease and a charge to be made. The Twenty-seventh led
s so few reports from the officers engaged, makes it difficult to fully ascertain the parts borne by the North Carolina troops. There were four North Carolina brigades and one regiment, the Fifty-fifth, Colonel Belo, in Hill's corps: Kirkland's—the Eleventh, Colonel Martin; Twenty-sixth, Lieutenant-Colonel Jones; Forty-fourth, Colonel Singeltary; Forty-seventh, Colonel Faribault; Fifty-second, Colonel Little; Cooke's brigade—the Fifteenth, Lieutenant-Colonel Yarborough; Twentysev-enth, Colonel Gilmer; Forty-sixth, Colonel Saunders; Forty-eighth, Colonel Walkup; Lane's brigade—the Seventh, Colonel Davidson; Eighteenth, Colonel Barry; Twenty-eighth, Colonel Speer; Thirty-third, Colonel Avery; Thirty-seventh, Colonel Barbour; Scales' brigade—Thirteenth, Colonel Hyman; Sixteenth, Colonel Stowe; Twenty-second, Colonel Galloway; Thirty-fourth, Colonel Lowrance; Thirty-eighth, Colonel Ashford. Cooke and Kirkland were in Heth's division, Scales and Lane in Wilcox's division. When Heth's
fter the close of hostilities he engaged in farming in Sebastian county, Ark., until 1881 , and then made his residence at Fort Smith. He died at Mount Nebo, September 8, 1896, at the age of eighty-seven years and eight months. Major-General Jeremy Francis Gilmer Major-General Jeremy Francis Gilmer was born in Guilford county, N. C., February 23, 1818. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1839, number four in the class of which General Halleck was third. Receiving Major-General Jeremy Francis Gilmer was born in Guilford county, N. C., February 23, 1818. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1839, number four in the class of which General Halleck was third. Receiving a second lieutenancy of engineers, he served in the military academy as assistant professor of engineering till June, 1840, and then as assistant engineer in building Fort Schuyler, New York harbor, until 1844, after which he was assistant to the chief engineer at Washington, D. C., until 1846, with promotion to first lieutenant in 1845. During the Mexican war he was chief engineer of the army of the West in New Mexico, constructing Fort Marcy at Santa Fe. He afterward served at Washington, a