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e message — copy of which is appended, and numbered 5. All the boats and skiffs having been taken off by citizens escaping from the Fort during the engagement, the message could not be delivered, although every effort was made to induce Captain Marshall to send his boat ashore by raising a white flag, with which Captain Young walked up and down the river, in vain, signalling her to come in, or send out a boat. She finally moved off, and disappeared around the bend above the Fort. General Gilmore withdrew his forces from the Fort before dark, and camped a few miles east of it. On the morning of the thirteenth, I again despatched Captain Anderson to Fort Pillow, for the purpose of placing, if possible, the Federal wounded on board their transports, and report to me, on his return, the condition of affairs at the river. I respectfully refer you to his report, numbered 6. My loss in the engagement was twenty killed and sixty wounded. That of the enemy unknown; two hundred and t
erection and completion of three new batteries on that portion of the island in his possession, thus advancing his lines as far as could be done with safety. On the twenty-first the enemy sent in, by a flag of truce, a communication from General Gilmore, with a request that the officer commanding Battery Wagner would give to General Vogdes, who accompanied it, a personal interview. While Captain Tracy, the staff officer of General Hagood, then in command, was bearing the message brought byHerewith are papers, marked A, B, C, D, E, F, connected with the defence of Morris Island during the present attack. G. T. Beauregard. headquarters Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, Charleston, July 15, 1863. It is reported Gilmore will open fire in the morning, and attempt an assault afterwards. Will be assisted by fleet. Be on watch and prepared. Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Official: H. H. Rogers, A. D. C. Send the above dispatch to Colonel Rhett, Fort Sumte
ttle-shaped territory which he occupied between the Appomattox and the James. That was exactly what Beauregard wanted, and the Confederate general immediately constructed field works all along Butler's front, effectually closing the neck of this bottle. Here Butler remained in inactivity till the close of the war. He built the elaborate signal tower seen in the picture so that he could observe all the operations of the Confederates, although he could make no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the J
ttle-shaped territory which he occupied between the Appomattox and the James. That was exactly what Beauregard wanted, and the Confederate general immediately constructed field works all along Butler's front, effectually closing the neck of this bottle. Here Butler remained in inactivity till the close of the war. He built the elaborate signal tower seen in the picture so that he could observe all the operations of the Confederates, although he could make no move against any of them. Generals Gilmore and Baldy Smith both urged upon Butler the laying of pontoons across the Appomattox in order to advance on Petersburg, the key to Richmond. But Butler curtly replied that he would build no bridges for West Pointers to retreat over. Butler's signal tower The lookout The thirteenth New York heavy artillery idling in winter quarters at Bermuda hundred Butler bottled up The impassable James river The gun is in Confederate Battery Brooke — another of the defenses on the J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The relative strength of the armies of Generals Lee and Grant. (search)
— I should say not less than twenty thousand effective men — to operate on the north side of James river, Richmond being your objective point. To the force you already have will be added about ten thousand men from South Carolina, under Major-General Gilmore, who will command them in person. Major-General W. F. Smith is ordered to report to you, to command the troops sent into the field from your own department. These troops, under Smith and Gilmore, afterwards constituted the Army of the JaGilmore, afterwards constituted the Army of the James, under Butler. Grant also says in the same report: A very considerable force under command of Major-General Sigel was so held for the protection of West Virginia, and the frontiers of Maryland and Pennsylvania. * * * General Sigel was therefore directed to organize all his available force into two expeditions, to move from Beverly and Charleston, under command of Generals Ord and Crook, against the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Subsequently, General Ord having been reliev
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 11: (search)
and (5,000) from Missouri. With this force he is to commence operations against Mobile as soon as he can. It will be impossible for him to commence too early. Gilmore joins Butler with ten thousand (10,000) men, and the two operate against Richmond from the south side of James River. This will give Butler thirty-three thousand (33,000) men to operate with; General W. F. Smith commanding the right wing of his forces, and Gilmore the left wing. I will stay with the Army of the Potomac, increased by Burnside's corps of not less than twenty-five thousand (25,000) effective men, and operate directly against Lee's army wherever it may be found. Sigel colcute in your own way. Submit to me, however, as early as you can, your plan of operations. As stated Banks is ordered to commence operations as soon as he can. Gilmore is ordered to report at Fortress Monroe by the 18th inst., or as soon thereafter as practicable. Sigel is concentrating now. None will move from their places of
o succeed him; but Foote dying before he could assume command, Dahlgren was substituted. This gentleman had, from a very early period in his career, directed his attention to ordnance, and turned to account the experiments of Colonel Paixan with shell-guns and shellfiring. He had much improved upon the old-fashioned naval ordnance, in vogue before the advent of steamships, and for these labors of his in the foundries and work-shops, he had been made an Admiral. He was now sent to aid General Gilmore, an engineer of some reputation, to carry out the favorite Boston idea of razing Charleston to the ground, as the original hot-bed of secession. They made a lodgment on Morris Island, but failed, as Dupont had done, against the other works. We have thus strung, as it were, upon our thread of the war, the more important military events that occurred during the first year of the cruise of the Alabama. We will now return to that ship. We left her at Saldanha Bay, near the Cape of Good H
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
the condition of affairs as he found them, coupled with his views and suggestions on many of the complicated questions which had arisen in the Southern States, owing to the changed circumstances immediately following the war. He personally conferred with the provisional governors of those States, and in his report refers to the harmonious action then existing between the civil and military authorities. After expressing his approval of the discretion of the three department commanders, Generals Gilmore, Ruger, and Terry, he concluded as follows: I have to report the condition of affairs as on the whole satisfactory. The people are slowly recovering from the shock of war. Everywhere the most earnest professions of submission to the result of the war were made, and I am disposed to give credit to their assertions within the limits of what may be presumed natural. But it must be remembered that it is not natural to expect a sudden revolution in the ideas in which a people have been alw
Geary, John W., I, 196; II, 56, 64, 65, 67, 70, 73, 91, 93, 94, 98, 101, 102, 353, 354, 357. Gerhard, Benjamin, II, 145, 196, 197, 199. Gerhard, William, II, 226. Gettysburg, battle of, July, 1863, II, 1-131, 139, 140, 153, 177, 179, 181, 186, 201, 210, 249, 354-361, 365, 366, 378-382, 400-422. Gibbon, John, I, 196, 351; II, 37, 38, 41, 63, 65, 78, 87, 89, 92, 95-97, 100, 105, 109, 153, 160, 161, 176, 181, 183, 188, 190, 209, 241, 256, 388-390, 409, 410, 413, 416-419, 422. Gilmore, Gen., II, 284. Glendale, battle of (see New Market Cross Roads). Gooch, Senator, II, 178, 187. Gordon, Jacob, I, 7. Gordon, John B., II, 19, 20, 50, 51, 57, 92, 366. Graham, Capt., I, 53. Graham, Charles K., II, 79, 83, 85, 96, 326, 419. Graham, Duncan, I, 301. Graham, James D., I, 14, 15, 150, 151, 155, 156, 209, 213, 216, 263. Graham, Mason, I, 90. Graham, Richard, I, 140, 145. Graham, Wm., I, 27, 50. Grant, Lewis A., II, 100. Grant, Ulysses S., I, 196
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
onesboro August 31-September 1. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Little Ogeechee River December 4. Station No. 5, Georgia Central R. R., December 4. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 32 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 8 Officers and 237 Enlisted men by disease. Total 279. 12th Illinois Regiment Cavalry Companies A, B, C, D, E and G organized at Springfield, Ill., and mustered in February 24, 1862. Captain Gilmore's Company of Cavalry, Company A, 32nd Illinois, organized at Camp Butler December 31, 1861; assigned as Company F. Captain Sheerer's and Captain Barker's Companies, McClellan Dragoons, organized at Chicago, Ill., October, 1861; assigned as Company H. Captain Brown's Company, McClellan Dragoons, organized at Chicago, Ill., October, 1861; assigned as Company I. Companies K, L and M organized at Springfield, 111., December 30, 1863, to January 12, 1864. Duty at Camp Butler, Ill., gua
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