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The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Girard, Stephen (search)
Girard, Stephen Philanthropist; born near Bordeaux, France, May 24, 1750; engaged in the merchant service in early life; established himself in mercantile business in Philadelphia in 1769, and traded to the West Indies until the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Resuming his West India trade after the war, he accumulated a large fortune; but the foundation of his great wealth was laid by events of the negro insurrection in Santo Domingo. Two of his vessels being there, planters placed their effects on board of them, but lost their lives in the massacre that ensued. The property of owners that could not be found was left in Girard's possession. In 1812 he bought the building and much of the stock of the old United States Bank, and began business as a private banker. He amassed a large fortune, and at his death, in Philadelphia Dec. 26, 1831, left property valued at almost $9,000,000. Besides large bequests to public institutions, he gave to Philadelphia $500,000 for the impro
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, Woman's rights. (search)
irely filled in taking care of her household, her cares must be so extensive, that neither those of soldiers nor sailors nor merchants can be equal to them; she has not a moment to qualify herself for politics! Woman cannot be spared long enough from the kitchen to put in a vote, though Abbott Lawrence can be spared from the counting-house, though General Gaines or Scott can be spared from the camp, though the Lorings and the Choates can be spared from the courts. This is the argument: Stephen Girard cannot go to Congress; he is too busy; therefore, no man ever shall. Because General Scott has gone to Mexico, and cannot be President, therefore no man shall be. Because A. B. is a sailor, gone on a whaling voyage, to be absent for three years, and cannot vote, therefore no male inhabitant ever shall. Logic how profound I how conclusive! Yet this is the exact reasoning in the case of woman. Take up the newspapers. See the sneers at this movement. Take care of the children, Make th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
strian Charles Sealsfield (Karl Postl), proud to call himself Burger von Nordamerika, who held up to view virile, reckless, self-reliant types of American manhood as objects for emulation to enthralled Europeans. Longfellow was especially fond of Sealsfield's depictions of the Red River country and its Creole inhabitants. The Cabin Book (Das Cajutenbuch) has for its historical setting the Texan war of independence against Mexican misrule. Morton oder die grosse tour presents a view of Stephen Girard's money-power and personal eccentricities. Lebensbilder aus der westlichen Hemisphare introduces the lure of pioneer life, with its gallery of Southern planters, hot-tempered Kentuckians, Eastern belles and dandies, alcaldes, squatters and desperadoes, American types as they appeared between 1820-1840. Sealsfield's Mexican stories (Virey, Nord und Sud) contain nature pictures in wonderful colours, a striking instance of which is found also in the Cabin Book, in the chapter called The P
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Wm., 244 Gibson, G. R., 143 Giesler-Anneke, Mathilde, 582, 587 Giessen (University), 479 Gifford, R. Swain, 167 Gilbert, G. K., 167 Gil Blas, 6 Gilded age, the, 6, 14, 19, 271 Gilded man, the, 144 Gilder, R. W., 31, 48-50, 121, 311, 312 Gilder, W. H., 169 Gildersleeve, B. L., 239 n., 459, 465– 467, 466 n., 480, 485 Giles Corey, 274 Gillette, Wm., 266, 278, 279, 280, 285-6 Gilman, D. C., 409, 470, 477 Gilmer, Francis W., 459 Gilmore, P. S., 497, 498 Girard, Stephen, 579 Girard College, 408 Girl and the Judge, the, 280 Girl I left behind Me, the, 266, 280 Girl of the Golden West, the, 272, 281 Girl with the Green eyes, the, 283, 284 Gladden, Washington, 216-218 Gleanings on Husbandry, 432 Glimpses of unfamiliar Japan, 155 Globe (Boston), 513 Globe-democrat (St. Louis), 325 Glory Trail, The, 161 Glossology, 479 Gloucester Moors, 64 Gobel, Gert, 587 Godey's Lady's Book, 305, 315 Godkin, E. L., 101, 121, 326, 327, 36
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1861., [Electronic resource], The capture of Commodore Robinson's pleasure yacht. (search)
Gen. Scott's Boasts. The Mobile Advertiser thus speaks: "It is a very hard matter for some men to learn that times have changed; tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur in illis; that vain and superficial fop, Scott, is a striking illustration of this truth. Soon after the war of 1812, he astonished the natives' by dashing into Richmond in Stephen Girard's carriage and four, driven by white postilions. It was reported at the time that the Philadelphia banker had made him a present of ten thousand dollars. He strutted and cut 'great swells.' That was his first visit, and it will be his last. He will never see Richmond again, unless he be brought there to be hung as a traitor and rebel, on Capitol Square.--It is no wonder that Watkins Leigh drank that memorable toast, 'Halloo, Scott, a fool for luck,' He talks of being in Richmond by the 15th of July !! He don't know that 'tempora mutanter,' he never read the 'Classics,' he don't understand Latin. A strutting peacock, to falk of
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
ing been eleven thousand, one hundred and eleven dollars. Stephen Girard. Stephen Girard has not been so long dead but many of the prStephen Girard has not been so long dead but many of the present generation still remember him distinctly, and his peculiarities; and no man possessed peculiarities of a more striking character.--Varioarities: "Within the memory of many persons still alive, 'old Girard,' as the famous banker was usually styled, a short, stout, brisk ol, 'I am sorry for it.' Never was there a person more destitute than Girard of the qualities which win the affection of others. His temper wasery man should labor to the last hour of his ability.' Such was Stephen Girard. "This is an unpleasing picture of a citizen of polite anded a grim and dreary world wherein should prevail the principles of Girard. But see what this man has done for the city that loved him not! would, perhaps, be willing to admit that there was room in the world for one Girard, though it were a pity there should ever be another."