Your search returned 60 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
's invaluable services have already been alluded to. Byrne's battery rendered not less useful service on Sunday, and again on Monday, to the Kentucky Brigade. When Byrne called on the Sixth Kentucky Regiment for a detail, No detail, cried John Spurrier, springing from the ranks, but all the volunteers you want! and thus he was supplied. Captain Polk lost a leg, fighting his guns well; Hodgson and Slocomb, with the Washington Artillery, are highly commended; and Bankhead's, Gage's, and Girardey's batteries; and, indeed, the record of gallant and effective service, commemorated in the battle reports, covers the entire list of batteries, so that almost any distinction seems invidious. The brigadiers and infantry commanders appear anxious to testify with generous gratitude to the obligations they were under to the artillery. A gallant soldier, Major Caldwell of the Ninth Kentucky, who afterward commanded a brigade, informed the writer that he never saw the artillery fight so audaci
e enemy's batteries. To Lieutenant-Colonel Warden, Lieutenant-Colonel Carswell, Major Ross, and Major Jones, and the skilful officers and brave men of their commands, is the country in no small degree indebted for the splendid results of the week. This command and the country have to deplore the untimely loss of Captain Heath, of the Twenty-second Georgia, Captain Kendrick and First Lieutenant Spier, of the Forty-eighth Georgia, who were killed on Sunday near Chancellorsville. To Captain Girardey, A. A. general, Lieutenant Hazlehurst and Captain Bell, aids-de-camp, I am greatly indebted for their valuable and efficient services during all the week's operations. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, A. R. Wright. Brigadier-General, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Perry. headquarters Perry's brigade, May 9, 1863. To Major Thomas S. Mills, A. A. General: Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
repidity of the man, Captain Hinton came up and reported that he had reported to General Mahone as directed, who said that I must await orders from him or Captain Girardey (who was then acting on Mahone's staff.) A few moments later Girardey came up to us. Just at that time I saw a Federal officer leap from the works with a staGirardey came up to us. Just at that time I saw a Federal officer leap from the works with a stand of colors in his hand, and at last fifty or more men with him, as I supposed purposing to charge us. I repeated my orders to Girardy and told him that if we did not move forward promptly all would be lost. He agreed with me, and I then requested him to report to Mahone the circumstances and that I had moved forward. I then gae liveliest satisfaction throughout the army and the country. Mahone was created Major-General from that date; Weisiger, who was wounded, Brigadier-General; Captain Girardey, of Mahone's staff, also Brigadier — the latter an extraordinary but just promotion, for he was a young officer whose talents and decisive vigor qualified hi
nto a regiment commanded by Col. Clayton, of 10 companies--800 men; and a battalion of 8 companies--600 men — under Lieut.-Col. Steadman. Several of the Alabama companies are assigned to batteries; one of them, under Lieut. Howard, having charge of the two 10-inch gun battery. The Alabamians are much cut up in their encampments and occupy a large space in the line. On their left are the Georgia Regiment, Col. Ramsey, 10 companies--750 men. This regiment, with the Alabama Regiment, and Capt. Girardey's artillery company in charge of the redoubt in the rear of Fort Barrancas, and battalion 63, make up the second division, commanded by Col. Clayton. The extreme left, extending from the Hospital to a point beyond the Navy Yard, is the division which Col. Gladden commands, and consists of the Florida Regiment, Col. Anderson, 620; of Major Lary's Georgia Battalion, 350; of Capt. Lee's artillery company, 114--composed entirely of artisans and mechanics; and of 1st Battalion of the Louisia
ommand of Colonel Walton, of the Washington artillery, marched on board the steamer Natchez, already chartered for the expedition by Maj.-Gen. J. L. Lewis. This force, intended for Baton Rouge, was composed of the following commands: The Crescent Rifles, Lieut. N. A. Metcalf, 49 men; Washington Artillery, Lieut.-Col. Voorhees, 56 men; Second company Chasseurs-a-pied, Maj. Bernard Avegno, 36 men; Orleans Cadets, Capt. Chas. D. Dreux, 39 men; Louisiana Guards, Capt. S. M. Todd, 41 men, Lieutenant Girardey commanding; Sarsfield Guards, Captain O'Hara, 16 men; Louisiana Grays, Capt W. C. Deane, 13 men. Total, 250. January 10th, the following companies, joking at their confined limits, left on board the towboat Yantic, the forts below the city being the objective point: Orleans battalion artillery (two companies), Captains Hebrard and Gomez, 57 men; First company Chasseurs-a-pied, Captain St. Paul, 44 men; Chasseurs d'orleans, Captain Hendolve, 15 men; the Jaegers (German), Captain Pe
he cause of his adopted State and entered the army as colonel of the First Louisiana infantry. He served with his regiment at Norfolk, Va., and in May, 1861, was in command of one of the two divisions of Huger's forces. With promotion to brigadier-general he commanded a brigade at Portsmouth, Va., consisting of the Third, Fourth and Twenty-second Georgia regiments of infantry, the Third Alabama infantry, the Third Louisiana infantry, Colonel Williams' North Carolina battalion of infantry, Girardey's Louisiana Guard artillery, and the Sussex cavalry. In April, 1862, he supported Colonel Wright in the operations about South Mills. In June, 1862, Gen. A. R. Wright took command of the brigade, and on account of his advanced age General Blanchard was not longer actively engaged. He was for a while in command at Drewry's bluff, afterward in North Carolina. After the war he returned to New Orleans and was surveyor and civil engineer from 1866 until 1870. He was deputy surveyor of the c
nd commanded the battery at different times. Extracts from official war Records. Vol. X, Part 1—(383) In General Chalmers' brigade, Shiloh. (532) General Withers in his report of Shiloh says: With such batteries, however, as Robertson's, Girardey's and Gage's, there could be no failure. (549, 551, 552) Commended by Gen. James R. Chalmers; battery suffered severely and did manful service, July 6th. Vol. X, Part 2—(307) In Colonel Mouton's brigade, March 9, 1862. Waddell's battery. uggles' report; (475) in Colonel Bankhead's report; (515) in Captain Hodgson's report. (532, 534) General Withers says: With such batteries there could be no failure. (537) Commended in Col. D. W. Adams' report of Shiloh. (566) Mentioned in General Girardey's report. (788) In Gardner's brigade, Bragg's army, June 30th. (809, 810) Mentioned in General Ruggles' report of Farmington, May 9th, distinguished for gallantry of captain and good conduct of men on the field. (813) Commended in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
siege of Knoxville, Captain Parker's battery of four captured Parrott rifles fired one hundred and twenty shell at the enemy's batteries and pontoon-bridge, of which only two failed to tumble, or to burst prematurely. Of the most valuable kind of rifle ammunition, shrapnel, the Confederates made none, on account of the scarcity of lead. Of the next most useful kind, percussion shell, (invaluable for getting the range,) few were to be had until the last year of the war. The fuse then used, Girardey's, was excellent, probably better than any of the enemy's patterns, and it possessed the peculiar excellence of being carried loose in the chest and applied to any shell at the moment it was needed, so that just as many shells could be made percussion as the gunner wished. This perfection of the fuse, however, was only reached during the fall of 1864, and before that period the percussionshell had a fuse-plug specially fitted to it at the arsenal, and the supply furnished was very small.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
siege of Knoxville, Captain Parker's battery of four captured Parrott rifles fired one hundred and twenty shell at the enemy's batteries and pontoon-bridge, of which only two failed to tumble, or to burst prematurely. Of the most valuable kind of rifle ammunition, shrapnel, the Confederates made none, on account of the scarcity of lead. Of the next most useful kind, percussion shell, (invaluable for getting the range,) few were to be had until the last year of the war. The fuse then used, Girardey's, was excellent, probably better than any of the enemy's patterns, and it possessed the peculiar excellence of being carried loose in the chest and applied to any shell at the moment it was needed, so that just as many shells could be made percussion as the gunner wished. This perfection of the fuse, however, was only reached during the fall of 1864, and before that period the percussionshell had a fuse-plug specially fitted to it at the arsenal, and the supply furnished was very small.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
r from himself in person or delivered through Girardey. Soon after I reached the right of the linptain, had I not better go in now? No, said Girardey, General Mahone desires to annex Wright's Bri in twenty feet of General Mahone. He and Major Girardey were talking. When the move on the part of the enemy commenced, Major Girardey left General Mahone and ran to the front, giving the command, two brigades had come, then indicating to Captain Girardey the ground on which I desired the Virgini the position which had been indicated to Captain Girardey for them to take for the attack. The d to Girardey, Tell Weisiger to forward. Captain Girardey, like the brilliant officer he was—never ders to forward. When General Mahone heard Girardey sing out, General, they are coming, and, turn At that time, it is more than probable that Girardey, exercising the authority which Mahone intend Weisiger to wait for an order from me or Captain Girardey, had authorized Weisiger to move forward [18 more...]
1 2