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Cleburne did not reach the parapet, but fell just outside. The army could not stand the unequal fight. It drew off to move against some other point of attack. Schofield moved out as soon as it was dark, and by midnight had his army mainly at Nashville. General Hood took possession of the Federal works, but it was after his own army had suffered terribly and the enemy had escaped. Hood's loss was estimated at 5,000 or 6,000. He had lost some of his best generals. Cleburne of Arkansas, Gist of South Carolina, Adams of Tennessee, Strahl of Tennessee, and Granbury of Texas, were killed; John C. Brown, Quarles, Cockrell, Manigault, Scott and Carter were wounded, and G. W. Gordon captured. The general officers riding behind .their men or in line with them were shining marks for the deadly rifles aimed from a rest behind breastworks. Cleburne was killed in a charge at double-quick. His horse was first killed under him, and he pressed forward with his men on foot, when he was kil
expected on the 14th, as well as other reenforcements under Gist, so that Johnston estimated his whole available force wouldmiles on the Canton road, and then went into camp. He sent Gist forty or fifty miles to the east, and ordered Maxcy to retue for the security of his brigade, for instance, by joining Gist. It was hoped thus to prevent Grant from drawing supplies rams were dispatched when the enemy was near, directing General Gist to assemble the approaching troops at a point forty or the security of his brigade — for instance, by joining General Gist. That body of troops will be able, I hope, to prevent e different directions—Pemberton south, Johnston north, and Gist to the east—while Grant was converging between them; Pemberno certain intelligence of General Pemberton's route or General Gist's position, I did not move on Saturday. Johnston's Repe would disperse and save them. So Johnston went north and Gist went east, while Grant converged. At this time, Pemberto<
er removed from a powerful and victorious army, that we might have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Lieutenant-General Hardee, as usual, is entitled to my warmest thanks and high commendation for his gallant and judicious conduct during the whole of the stands of colors and several hundred prisoners, and who afterwards brought up our rear with great success, again charging and routing the pursuing column at Ringgold, on the 27th, is commended to the special notice of the government. Brigadier-Generals Gist and Bate, commanding divisions, Cumming, Walthall, and Polk, commanding brigades, were distinguished for coolness, gallantry, and successful conduct, throughout the engagements, and in the rear-guard on the retreat. To my staff, perso
formed that Jackson must be evacuated, was ordered to hold back the Federals until Gen. John Adams should prepare his train and retreat on the Canton road. At 3 a. m. Gregg marched out for this purpose toward Clinton, while Colonel Colquitt, with Gist's brigade, supported by Walker's, took an advanced position on the Raymond road. The Federal attacks were made almost simultaneously by McPherson on the Raymond road and Sherman on the Clinton road, but they were both held back, the troops behavi Gregg and his command to evacuate Jackson about noon to-day. The necessity of taking the Canton road at right angles to that upon which the enemy approached prevented an obstinate defense. He also stated that, being reinforced by the brigade of Gist, from Beauregard's department, and Maxey's brigade, he hoped to prevent the enemy from drawing provisions from the east, and continued: Can he supply himself from the Mississippi? Can you not cut him off from it? and above all, should he be comp
of the army which General Johnston had collected at Jackson for June 25th shows the following organization: Division of Maj.-Gen. John C. Breckinridge—brigades of D. W. Adams, Helm and Stovall, aggregate present, 6,884. Division of Maj.-Gen. S. G. French—brigades of N. G. Evans, McNair and Maxey, aggregate present, 7,466. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring —brigades of John Adams, Buford, and Featherston, aggregate present, 7,427. Division of Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker—brigades of Ector, Gist, Gregg and Wilson, aggregate present, 9,571. Cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. Jackson—brigades of Cosby and Whitfield, aggregate present, 4,373. Camp of direction, 247; reserve artillery, 294. Grand aggregate present was reported at 36,315; effective total, 28,154. Breckinridge's division was ordered forward to Clinton from Jackson, June 30th, and on the evening of July 1st Johnston's army encamped between Brownsville and the Yazoo river. Col. Wirt Adams, reconnoitering near Edwards
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
investigation will bring out the truth, however, and full justice shall be done to the good and the bad. After arriving at Chickamauga and informing myself of the full condition of affairs, it was decided to put the army in motion for a point farther removed from a powerful and victorious army, that we might have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as brea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
investigation will bring out the truth, however, and full justice shall be done to the good and the bad. After arriving at Chickamauga and informing myself of the full condition of affairs, it was decided to put the army in motion for a point farther removed from a powerful and victorious army, that we might have some little time to replenish and recuperate for another struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold, but was so handsomely checked by Major-General Cleburne and Brigadier-General Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertained, but in killed and wounded it is known to be very small. In stragglers and prisoners, I fear it is much larger. The Chief of Artillery reports the loss of forty pieces. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. Note.—As a matter of justice to General Anderson's Division, charged in the above report as brea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The twenty-fourth South Carolina at the battle of Jonesboro. (search)
The twenty-fourth South Carolina at the battle of Jonesboro. Official report of Colonel Ellison Capers. headquarters twenty-Fourth regiment,) South Carolina Volunteers, Jonesboro, Ga., September 12th, 1864. To Major B. B. Smith, A. A. G., Gist's Brigade: Major,—I submit herewith a report of the part borne by my regiment in front of Jonesboro on the afternoon of the 1st instant. The brigade having been ordered from the left of the corps at I o'clock P. M. to the extreme right, was placed in position by the Lieutenant-General, in person, on the right, and east of the railroad. The left rested on the railroad cut, which, at that point, was some eight or ten feet deep, the formation of the brigade being in one rank. Our line ran through a thick undergrowth and wood near the railroad, and was entirely without fortifications. The Second battalion of Georgia Sharp-shooters, Major Whitely, occupied the left of the brigade, resting on the railroad cut, and the Twenty-fourth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General P. R. Cleburne. Dedication of a monument to his memory at Helena, Arkansas, May 10th, 1891. (search)
e, and being few in numbers they were driven back to the opposite side of the works, behind which they took position and bravely held the line they had previously taken. Night soon intervening, the Federal army withdrew from the field and retired to Nashville. This was a gallant and glorious fight on the part of the Confederates, but a sad disaster to their cause and their country. The intrepid Cleburne had fallen. Generals Granberry and Adams of his command, Generals Carter, Strahl and Gist of Cheatham's command and of the division of which my brigades composed a part, had also fallen, while hundreds of others, less notable but no less brave and self-sacrificing, had made their last charge and had fought their last battle. For reckless, desperate courage this conflict will rank with Gettysburg or Balaklava. Referring again to General Cleburne's action upon this memorable field, it appears upon first view as if inspired by desperation. For he was so close to the enemy, so co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
movement by Cleburne on the left. Stewart, having been transferred to Buckner, these two divisions constituted Hill's corps. In rear of the line from which Breckinridge and Cleburne moved to the attack, at nine in the morning, on the last decisive day, was the corps of the old veteran known as Fighting Bill Walker, and as eager for the fray as a school-boy for frolic. His command was composed of his own and Liddell's divisions, embracing six brigades led by such dashing soldiers as Ector, Gist and Walthall. But the first lesson learned by a staff officer, who went from the east to the west, was that even an old war-horse like Walker dared not to fire a gun or move an inch, acting upon his own best judgment, without an order brought with due formality through all of the regular channels. The Virginia Brigadier struck his blows where opportunity offered, and reported to his superior that he was striking. The western Brigadier lost his opportunity to strike, waiting for permission
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