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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 15 5 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 14 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 7 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 6 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Gist or search for Gist in all documents.

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o the rear of that to which they had advanced, pursuing their advantage; when his front was again charged by Liddell's and Gist's divisions — Reynolds being first struck on his right (Thomas having been looking for an attack on his left); then Johnsohurled his battalions upon our right, at the same time opening his batteries with a storm of shell and grape. Liddell and Gist, of Walker's corps, who had been again ordered forward, being their fifth engagement with the enemy, were met by a most denother struggle. The enemy made pursuit as far as Ringgold; but was so handsomely checked by Maj.-Gen. Cleburne and Brig.-Gen. Gist, in command of their respective divisions, that he gave us but little annoyance. Our losses are not yet ascertainter by Greysville and Ringgold; Palmer, in his advance, having overtaken and charged by the way the Rebel rear-guard under Gist, breaking it and capturing 3 guns: our advance — badly delayed by the non-arrival of pontoons at the Chickamauga — bivouac<
er, leaving his dead and his wounded in our possession. Never did troops fight more gallantly. During the day, I was restrained from using my artillery, on account of the women and children remaining in the town. At night, it was massed, ready to continue the action in the morning; but the enemy retired. We captured about a thousand prisoners, and several stands of colors. Our total loss, in killed, wounded, and prisoners, was 4,500. Among the killed were Maj.-Gen. P. R. Cleburne, Brig.-Gens. Gist, John Adams, Strahl, and Granbury. Maj.-Gen. Brown, with Brig.-Gens. Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott, were wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Gordon captured. The number of dead left by the enemy on the field indicated that his loss was equal to or near our own. The next morning at daylight — the wounded being cared for and the dead buried — we moved forward toward Nashville: Forrest with his cavalry pursuing the enemy vigorously. The loss of Pat. Cleburne--the Stonewall Jacks
uns from Vaughan at Wytheville, Va., 688. Gillmore, Gen. Quincy A., routs Pegram near Somerset, 427; his plan for bombarding Fort Pulaski adopted, 456; 457; fall of Fort Pulaski due to, 458; succeeds Gen. Hunter in command of the Department of the South, 473; condition of his army and plan of operations, 473-4; establishes the marsh battery, which opens on Charleston, 478-9; captures Fort Wagner, 481; stops blockade-running at Charleston, 482; occupies Jacksonville unresisted, 528; 630. Gist, Gen., at Chickamauga, 417; killed at Franklin, Tenn., 683. Gladding, Brig.-Gen., killed at Shiloh, 70. Glendale, Va., battle of, 161 to 163; extracts from various reports of, 162-3; Sam. Wilkeson's account of retreat from, 164. Golding's farm, fight at, 160. Goldsboroa, N. C., Schofield enters, 716; Sherman arrives, 708. Goldsborough, Com. L. M., with Burnside's expedition, 73; relieved from command, 76; 121. Gooding, Col. O. P., encounters a Rebel force near Red river, 589