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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
third Georgia are given as reported for June 22 and July 31. Manning reported in command of Fiftieth Georgia, June 22. No commander reported on return for July 31. Brig.-Gen. . P. J. Semmes, Col. Goode Bryan; 10th Ga., Col. John B. Weems; 50th Ga., Col. W. R. Manning; 51st Ga., Col. E. Ball; 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford; 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan ; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. E. S. Barclay. Artillery, Col. H. C. Cabell; 1st N. C. Art., Batt. A, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. C. Fraser, Lieut. W. J. Furlong; 1st Richmond Howitzers, Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton, Lieut. C. W. Motes. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett:--Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. B. Garnett, Maj. C. S. Peyton; 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton; 18th Va., Lieut.-Col. H. A. Carrington; 19th Va.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
4; m, 91=430. Barksdale's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Barksdale (m w), Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys: 13th Miss., Col. J. W. Carter; 17th Miss., Col. W. D. Holder, Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Col. T. M. Griffin, Lieut.-Col. W. H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. B. G. Humphreys. Brigade loss: k, 105; w, 550; in, 92=747. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William T. Wofford: 16th Ga., Col. Goode Bryan; 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; 24th Ga., Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips's (Ga.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. E. S. Barclay. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 192; m, 112 = 334. Artillery Battalion, Col. Henry C. Cabell: A, 1st N. C., Capt. B. C. Manly; Ga. Battery (Pulaski Art'y), Capt. J. C. Fraser (m w), Lieut. W. J. Furlong; Va. Battery (1st Richmond Howitzers), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Ga. Battery (Troup Art'y), Capt. H. H. Carlton (w), Lieut. C. W. Motes. Battalion loss: k, 8; w, 29 = 37. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett. Garnett's Bri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
gade, Brig.-Gen. John Bratton: 1st S. C., Col. James R. Hagood; 5th. S. C., Col. A. Coward; 6th S. C., Col. J. M. Steedman; 2d S. C. Rifles, Col. R. E. Bowen; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Joseph Walker. Kershaw's division, Maj.-Gen. J. B. Kershaw. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Dudley M. DuBose: 16th Ga., Maj. J. H. Skelton; 18th Ga., Col. Joseph Armstrong; 24th Ga., Col. C. C. Sanders; 3d Ga. Batt'n Sharp-shooters, Lieut.-Col. N. L. Hutchins, Jr.; Cobb's Ga. Legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips Ga. Legion, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Hamilton. Humphreys's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. B. G. Humphreys: 13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. A. G. O'Brien; 17th Miss., Capt. J. C. Cochran; 18th Miss., Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. D. N. Moody. Bryan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan: 10th Ga., Col. Willis C. Holt; 50th Ga., Col. P. McGlashan; 51st Ga., Lieut.-Col. James Dickey; 53d Ga., Col. J. P. Simms. Conner's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James Conner: 2d S. C., Col. J. D. Kennedy; 3d S.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
South Carolina.--To Alabama, A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia. James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama.--To North Carolina, Isham W Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W. Pettus; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia. Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia.--To Missouri, Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning. Mississippi.--To South Carolina, C. E. Hooker; to Alabama, Joseph W. Matthews; to Georgia, William L. Harris; to Louisiana, Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, Geo. R. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee, T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaware, Henry Dickinson; to Missouri,---Russell.--McPherson's Political History of th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
e fact at the beginning of the session, not only from conversation with the members, but from the reception given to a communication, written and verbal, from Luther J. Glenn, an accredited Commissioner from Georgia, and who was allowed to address the Convention on the subject of his mission on the first day of its session in St. Louis. March 4, 1861. In his written communication and in his speech he strongly urged Missouri to join the Southern Confederacy. Mr. Glenn's communication to the Convention was referred to a Committee, whereof John B. Henderson was chairman. That Committee reported on the 21st of March. They regretted that the Commissioner frwhile immigrants from the Slave-labor States, and especially from Virginia, composed the great body of the secessionists. The spectators in the Convention greeted Glenn's remarks with hisses and hootings; and subsequently the Convention itself, through a committee to which the Commissioner's communication was referred, assured him
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
led, March 4, with Sterling Price as president, and Samuel A. Lowe as secretary. Price professed to be a Unionist, and so obtained his election. He soon afterwards became one of the most active Confederate military leaders in that region. Luther J. Glenn, an accredited commissioner from Georgia, was allowed to address the convention on the first day of the session at St. Louis. He strongly urged Missouri to join the Southern Confederacy ; but it was found that the atmosphere of St. Louis, igenial to the nourishment of such an idea. The population of that city was made up largely of New-Englanders and Germans, who were loyal; while emigrants from slave-labor States, especially Virginia, composed the great body of the Confederates. Glenn's remarks were greeted with hisses by spectators at the convention. The convention itself officially assured him that his views were not acceptable to that body, and its proceedings throughout were marked by a great dignity and propriety. The
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Secession of Southern States. (search)
South Carolina sent to Alabama A. P. Calhoun; to Georgia, James L. Orr; to Florida, L. W. Spratt; to Mississippi, M. L. Bonham; to Louisiana, J. L. Manning; to Arkansas, A. C. Spain; to Texas, J. B. Kershaw. Alabama sent to North Carolina Isham W. Garrett; to Mississippi, E. W-Petters; to South Carolina, J. A. Elmore; to Maryland, A. F. Hopkins; to Virginia., Frank Gilmer; to Tennessee, L. Pope Walker; to Kentucky, Stephen F. Hale; to Arkansas, John A. Winston. Georgia sent to Missouri Luther J. Glenn; to Virginia, Henry L. Benning. Mississippi sent to South Carolina C. E. Hooker; to Alabama, Joseph W. Matthews; to Georgia, William L. Harris; to Louisiana, Wirt Adams; to Texas, H. H. Miller; to Arkansas, George B. Fall; to Florida, E. M. Yerger; to Tennessee T. J. Wharton; to Kentucky, W. S. Featherstone; to North Carolina, Jacob Thompson, the Secretary of the Interior; to Virginia, Fulton Anderson; to Maryland, A. H. Handy; to Delaware, Henry Dickinson; to Missouri, P. Russell. O
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
, Ben C. Yancey, major, J. C. Rutherford, adjutant. The infantry captains were W. D. Conyers (A), C. A. McDaniel (B), L. J. Glenn (C), Thomas Camak (D), W. S. Morris (E), W. F. S. Powell (F), G. B. Knight (G). The cavalry captains were T. P. Stovaccessors to the first field officers were: Cols. P. M. B. Young and G. I. Wright; Lieut.-Cols. Jeff M. Lamar (died), Luther J. Glenn, R. S. King and William G. Deloney; Majs. J. M. Lamar, W. G. Deloney, L. J. Glenn, Z. A. Rice, Thomas M. Camak, G. L. J. Glenn, Z. A. Rice, Thomas M. Camak, G. I. Wright and W. D. Conyers. The successors to the First infantry captains were W. W. McDaniel (B), M. F. Liddell and A. C. Grier (C), W. A. Winn (killed) and James F. Wilson (D), T. B. Cox (E), and J. C. Barnett (G). The successors to the First caStovall, B. C. King, O. H. P. Julian, J. J. Thomas, B. C. Young, C. H. Sanders, W. L. Conyers; Company B, M. D. Jones, L. J. Glenn, W. W. McDaniels; Company C, W. G. Deloney, T. C. Williams; Company D, C. H. Camfield, W. J. Lawton, J. F. Wilson, W.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ial, (F) W. D. Jones, (G) William M. Williams, (H) J. E. Ritch, (I) W. B. Young, (K) F. E. Eve, (L) A. M. Rogers. The history of this splendid command can be found in the sketch of Cobb's legion, which has already been given. Throughout its long and active service there were many changes. The officers who during this time succeeded those named above were: Capts. (A) Z. A. Rice, T. P. Stovall, B. C. King, O. H. P. Julian, J. J. Thomas, B. C. Yancey, C. H. Sanders and W. L. Conyers, (B) L. J. Glenn and William W. McDaniels, (C) T. C. Williams, (D) C. H. Camfield, W. J. Lawton, J. F. Wilson and W. A. Winn, (E) B. S. King, T. B. Cox, W. S. C. Morris, (F) William T. S. Powell and G. W. Moore, (G) J. C. Barnett and G. B. Knight, (H) W. A. Cain, (I) William Duke, (K) J. J. Floyd. The Tenth regiment of Georgia cavalry was formed in July, 1864, from seven Georgia companies of the Seventh Confederate regiment and three companies of Millen's Twentieth battalion of cavalry, under Col. V. H
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
e nobly doing his duty, and Lieut. Thomas J. Verdery, of the Twenty-first, was also among the slain. But the most famous incident of this battle, as often quoted among the glorious defenses of military history as is the charge at Cemetery hill among the assaults, was the performance of Cobb's brigade at Marye's hill. His heroic command was now composed of the Sixteenth regiment, Col. Goode Bryan; Eighteenth, Col. W. T. Wofford; Twenty-fourth, Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's legion, Lieut.-Col. L. J. Glenn, and Phillips' legion, Col. W. Phillips, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb, who had succeeded Gen. Howell Cobb. On the night of December 11th, the brigade had taken its position in the Telegraph road, a sunken highway at the base of Marye's hill, on the side of which, next the town, was a stone wall, shoulder high, against which the earth was banked, making an almost impregnable defense. When on the morning of the 13th the Federals in great masses of troops advance
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