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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
he interest thus aroused was fostered by the coming to Harvard a few years later, as instructor in German, of Charles T. Follen, a political exile. From about this time, some direct knowledge of Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, of Schleiermacher, of Goethe and Schiller — of Goethe probably more than of any other German writer-gradually began to make its way into New England, while the indirect German influence was even greater, coming in part through France in the works of Madame de Stael, Cousin, Goethe probably more than of any other German writer-gradually began to make its way into New England, while the indirect German influence was even greater, coming in part through France in the works of Madame de Stael, Cousin, and Jouffroy, but much more significantly through England, in subtle form in the poetry of Wordsworth, more openly in the writings of Coleridge, There is practically no question that of all these influences the works of Coleridge stand first in importance, and it is due to this fact that New England transcendentalism, in so far as it is a philosophy, bears a closer resemblance to the metaphysical system of Schelling (whose influence on Coleridge is well known) than to that of any other thinke
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
d, William, 171, 178, 206, 249 Gilbert, Sir, Humphrey, I, 3 Gladiator, the, 221, 224 Glance at New York, a, 228 Gleaner, 233 Gloria Brittannorum, 159 Glory of Columbia, the, 219, 226 Godfrey, Thomas, 122, 216-217, 218 Godfrey, Thomas, Jr., 122, 161, 176, 177 God's controversy with New England, 157 God's Protecting Providence, etc., 7 Godwin, Parke, 260 n., 262 n., 266 n., 269 n., 272 n., 276, 277, 277 n., 282 n. Godwin, William, 288, 290, 291, 292, 307, 331 Goethe, 188, 212, 268, 332 Golden Fleece, the, 3 Golden Hind, 1 Goldsmith, 162, 163, 174, 177, 181, 233, 234, 235, 238, 254, 279, 305 Good news from New England, 19 Goodrich, S. G., 240 Gookin, Daniel, 25, 27 Gordon, Thomas, 118 n. Gospel, the, 133 Gospel order revived, the, 55 Graham, Rev., David, 234 Grant, Anne McV., 311 Grave, 263, 271 Gray, Thomas, 171, 176, 177, 181, 183, 276, 278 Greeley, Horace, 276 Green, Rev., Joseph, 153, 160 Green Mountain boy, the
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
uered at Waterloo. The world has never got time to listen to the explanation. Sufficient for it that the Allies entered Paris. In like manner, it seems hardly the province of a defeated Church and State to deny the skill of measures by which they have been conquered. It may sound strange to some, this claim for Mr. Garrison of a profound statesmanship. Men have heard him styled a mere fanatic so long, that they are incompetent to judge him fairly. The phrases men are accustomed, says Goethe, to repeat incessantly, end by becoming convictions, and ossify the organs of intelligence. I cannot accept you, therefore, as my jury. I appeal from Festus to Caesar; from the prejudice of our streets to the common sense of the world, and to your children. Every thoughtful and unprejudiced mind must see that such an evil as slavery will yield only to the most radical treatment. If you consider the work we have to do, you will not think us needlessly aggressive, or that we dig down un
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 11 (search)
sacredness of man. Let us hold on to it; it is to be our salvation. Mr. President, the toast to which you called upon me to respond says our fathers have secured prosperity and peace. Yes, secured it. It is not here; we have not yet got it, but we shall have it. It is all secured, for they planted so wisely, it will come. They planted their oak or pine tree in the broad lines of New England, and gave it room to grow. Their great care was, that it should grow, no matter at what cost. Goethe says, that, if you plant an oak in a flower-vase, either the oak must wither or the vase crack: some men go for saving the vase. Too many now-a-days have that anxiety: the Puritans would have let it crack. So say I. If there is anything that cannot bear free thought, let it crack. There is a class among us so conservative, that they are afraid the roof will come down if you sweep off the cobwebs. As Douglass Jerrold says, They can never fully relish the new moon, out of respect for that
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 19 (search)
quare and sharp it almost cuts you to look at it, staring with white paint and green blinds, as if dropped in the landscape, or come out to spend an afternoon* [Laughter.] The trouble now is, that, in regard to the most turbulent question of the age, our politicians and a knot of privileged slaveholders are trying to keep the people in. side of this parchment band. Like Lycurgus, they would mould the people to fit the Constitution, instead of cutting the Constitution to fit the people. Goethe said, If you plant an oak in a flower-vase, one of two things will happen,--the oak will die, or the vase break. Our acorn swelled; the tiny leaves showed themselves under the calm eye of Washington, and he laid down in hope. By and by the roots enlarged, and men trembled. Of late, Webster and Clay, Everett and Botts, Seward and Adams, have been anxiously clasping the vase, but the roots have burst abroad at last, and the porcelain is in pieces. [Sensation.] All ye who love oaks, thank G
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Christianity a battle, not a dream (1869). (search)
to tell the human race the secret by which it could lift itself to a higher plane of moral and intellectual existence. I have weighed Christianity as the great and vital and elemental force which underlies Europe,--to which we are indebted for European civilization. I have endeavored to measure its strength, to estimate its permanence, to analyze its elements; and if they ever came from the unassisted brain of one uneducated Jew, while Shakspeare is admirable, and Plato is admirable, and Goethe is admirable, this Jewish boy takes a higher level; he is marvellous, wonderful; he is in himself a miracle. The miracles he wrought are nothing to the miracle he was, if at that era and that condition of the world he invented Christianity. Whately says, To disbelieve is to believe. I cannot be so credulous as to believe that any mere man invented Christianity. Until you show me some loving heart that has felt more profoundly, some strong brain that, even with the aid of his example, has
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
of serene faith in the safety of trusting truth wholly to her own defence. For other men we walk backward, and throw over their memories the mantle of charity and excuse, saying reverently, Remember the temptation and the age. But Vane's ermine has no stain; no act of his needs explanation or apology; and in thought he stands abreast of our age,--like pure intellect, belongs to all time. Carlyle said, in years when his words were worth heeding, Young men, close your Byron, and open your Goethe. If my counsel had weight in these halls, I should say, Young men, close your John Winthrop and Washington, your Jefferson and Webster, and open Sir Harry Vane. The generation that knew Vane gave to our Alma Mater for a seal the simple pledge,--Veritas. But the narrowness and poverty of colonial life soon starved out this element. Harvard was rededicated Christo et Ecclesiae; and up to the middle of the last century, free thought in religion meant Charles Chauncy and the Brattle-Street
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Rev. Convers Francis. (search)
Bettine is a perpetual refreshment to my soul. Nothing disturbs me so much as to have any Philistine make remarks about her. Not that I think her connection with Goethe beautiful or altogether natural. (I need not have said that; for if it were truly natural, it would be altogether beautiful, let conventionalisms try their worst upon it.) Did I ever tell you how expressively John Dwight said all that is to be said on this subject? It is evident that Goethe was to Bettine merely the algebraic X that stands for the unknown quantity. Mr. Brisbane, the Fourier Association man, told me that he was well acquainted with Bettine in Germany, and that no one king old woman; but with a fire in her dark eye easily kindled into brilliant beauty. As for conventional forms, the giant soul should indeed rend them like cobwebs when they cross the pathway of Truth and Freedom. But there is an eternal distinction between right and wrong, Goethe end Bettine to the contrary notwithstanding.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
as the same natures would have been if removed from the social pressure to which all clergymen are obliged to submit. The most mettlesome horse loses his elasticity and bounding grace after plodding a while round the mill-wheel circle. You see how far apart we are! You always at home among clericals, I at home only among poets and artists! You reading Italian sermons of past centuries, I bothering my brain to prove to myself (I have done wishing to prove anything to anybody except myself) Goethe's theory of Colors, by a similar theory of Tones! You know I always wondered why on earth you were interested in such a butterfly as I am. That I love you very sincerely is a positive fact, and not as unaccountable as your regard for me. Our friendship always seems to me like a companionship between Minerva and Fenella. I am sure all your wisdom will not enable you to tell what extraordinary leaps and somersets I may yet make, or whether the next rope I dance on will be tight or slack.
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
Banneker, Benjamin, 184. Beecher, Henry Ward, magnetic power of, 193; defends the Chinese, 251. Beethoven's music contrasted with Mendelssohn's, 76. Benson, Edmund, 89. Berrien, John McP., U. S. Senator, anecdote of, 179. Bettine and Goethe, 50, 51. Bible, anti-slavery texts from, 123-125. Bishop, Madame Anna, 140. Bleby, Rev., Henry, 134. Boston Athenaeum, privileges of, given to, and withdrawn from, Mrs. Child, 195, 264. Boutwell, George S , speech of, 168. Bremer,ef in continued existence, 254; his influence on Mrs. Child's life, 255. Gay, Mrs. S. II., 177. Gibbons, James S., house of, gutted by rioters, 178. Giles, Governor, message of, to Virginia Legislature, 132. Girl's book. The, VII. Goethe and Bettine, 50, 51, Grant's (President U. S.) election, 199; reelection, 213; his Indian policy, 220. Griffith, Miss, Mattie, emancipates her slaves, 89-91; her Autobiography of a female slave, 90, 132. Grimke, Angelina, addresses a com
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