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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
d him and said it had a worldly appearance, Not more worldly, the curate replied, than a certain ball at Blenheim Palace at which the bishop had been present. The bishop explained that he was staying in the house, to be sure, but was never within three rooms of the dancing. Oh! If it comes to that, your lordship, said the curate, I never am within three fields of the hounds. Grant that nowhere in America have we yet got within those three fields,--we will not say of Shakespeare, but of Goethe, of Voltaire, even of Heine,--the hunt has at least been interesting, and we know not what to-morrow may bring forth. Matthew Arnold indignantly protested against regarding Emerson as another Plato, but thought that if he were to be classed with Marcus Aurelius or Epictetus, a better case might be made out; and certainly that is something, while we wait for the duplicate Plato to be born. Our new literature must express the spirit of the New World. We need some repression, no doubt, as th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
vels are Hannah Thurston (1863); John Godfrey's fortunes (1864); The story of Kennett (1866); Joseph and his friend (1870); and Beauty and the Beast, and tales of home (1872). His books of poetry, by which he is, perhaps, best known, include The poet's journal (1862); Poems (1865); The Masque of the Gods (1872); Lars: a pastoral of Norway (1873); Home-Pastorals (1875); The national Ode (1876); and Prince Deukalion: a lyrical Drama (1878). His most valuable work in verse was a translation of Goethe's Faust. Some of his miscellaneous writings were published after his death under the title Studies in German literature (1879); and Essays and notes (1880). Died in Berlin, Germany, Dec. 15, 1878. Thaxter, Celia [Laighton] Born in Portsmouth, N. H., June 29, 1836. Her father, Thomas B. Laighton, was keeper of the Isles of Shoals lighthouse, and here most of her life was passed. In 1851 she married Levi Lincoln Thaxter. Her works include Among the Isles of Shoals (1873); Poems (1871
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
se, let it rise till it meet the sun in his coming; let the earliest light of morning gild it, and parting day linger and play on its summit. Here the thought is nothing, the style everything. No one can repeat those words and be deaf to their music or insensible to the rhythm and beauty of the prose with the Saxon words relieved just sufficiently by the Latin derivatives. The ease with which it is done may be due to training, but the ability to do it comes from natural gifts which, as Goethe says, we value more as we get older because they can not be stuck on. Possibly to some people it may seem very simple to utter such a sentence. One can only repeat what Scott says somewhere about Swift's style, perhaps the purest and strongest we have in the language. Swift's style, said Scott, seems so simple that one would think any child might write as he does, and yet if we try we find to our despair that it is impossible. It is not easy to say how much Webster's literary art was d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
r in his moments of relaxation, a few of his intimate letters to the American having been published among those of Motley. Most delightful are the young student's own letters home during his Wanderjahre. He worked hard, indeed, at law in both universities, but it was the glimpses of Europe and the human side of its life, both past and present, that were the really vital part of the educational results for the young American. Intellectual Germany was still palpitating with the influence of Goethe, whom he was just too late to see, and he was deeply impressed by the atmosphere. He met scholars, such as Tieck, then at work on his translation of Shakespeare, and he learned what minute research could be. At the same time Motley retained an impressionistic attitude towards history which was wholly un-German. He always saw the past instinct with life. He is constantly reconstructing. If you will allow me to mount my hobby, as Tristram Shandy would say, he writes from Rome in 1834, and
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
me grounds as those upon which he condemned Plato himself. Anti-Platonism is the key to Norton's position. Norton's teaching is praised by his disciple William Henry Furness (1802-96), who carried it to the First Unitarian Church in Philadelphia; and it must, in fact, have been a powerful stimulus to anyone who could taste his austerity and his intellectual keenness. He is not wholly free from banalities, those devils that stand ever ready at the clerical elbow; he prefers Mrs. Stowe to Goethe; but the great body of his work is ascetically pure in taste as in style. It can still be read with pleasure, indeed with a certain intellectual thrill. The work of enfranchisement was carried on in their several modes by three notable contemporaries: Horace Bushnell (1802-76), Henry Ward Beecher (1813-87), and Mark Hopkins (1802-87), each in his way a liberator. Superficially, Bushnell may seem to have been a reactionary. Born in Litchfield Township, Connecticut, he graduated at Yal
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
81 Gibbons vs. Ogden, 75, 93 n. Gift, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, a Token of Remembrance for 1848, The, 171, 174 Gilchrist, Anne, 271, 272, 272 n., 273 Giles Cory of the Salem farms, 39 Give Me Your hand, Johnny bull, 286 Gladstone, 224, 314, 320 God in Christ, 212 Globe (Washington), The, 183 God save the South, 305 Godey, Louis A., 60, 168 Godey's lady's Book, 164, 168, 371 God's acre, 36 Godwin, William, 197, 205 Goethe, 102, 133, 211 Goff (Regicide), 202 Gold Bug, the, 59, 68, 351, 371 Golden legend, the, 37, 38, 39 Goldsmith, 96, 148, 225, 234, 237, 349, 368 Gomara, 129 Gooch, C. P., 128 Good-bye, My Lover, Good-bye, 408 Good Gray poet, the, 270 Goodrich, Samuel Griswold, 19, 154, 173, 399, 403, 404, 405, 406 Goose pond School, the, 389 Gordon, John Brown, 318, 320 Gordon, Rev., William, 104 Gottingen, 33, 110, 112, 133 Gould, Judge, 215 Goulding, F. R., 403 G
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 6: the Transcendentalists (search)
d Transcendentalist in 1836, 1837, and 1838 has the key to Emerson. He was a seer, not a system-maker. The constitution of his mind forbade formal, consecutive, logical thought. He was not a philosopher in the accepted sense, though he was always philosophizing, nor a metaphysician in spite of his curious searchings in the realm of metaphysics. He sauntered in books as he sauntered by Walden Pond, in quest of what interested him; he fished in Montaigne, he said, as he fished in Plato and Goethe. He basketed the day's luck, good or bad as it might be, into the pages of his private Journal, which he called his savings-bank, because from this source he drew most of the material for his books. The Journal has recently been printed, in ten volumes. No American writing rewards the reader more richly. It must be remembered that Emerson's Essays, the first volume of which appeared in 1841, and the last volumes after his death in 1889, represent practically three stages of composition:
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
his opinions on them; the historical and critical works of Goethe and Schiller, and the outlines of history of our own countell, besides giving a sort of general lecture on Schiller; Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea; Goetz von Berlichingen; Iphigenia;er favorite literary project, the preparation of a Life of Goethe for Mr. Ripley's series of translations from foreign literor this that she translated Eckermann's conversations with Goethe, though it did not appear till after her removal to Jamaicish from which one has so vivid and familiar impression of Goethe. Her preface is clear, moderate, and full of good points,t and critic, The Allston exhibition, and Menzel's view of Goethe, --and two of what may be called fantasy-pieces, Leila, an containing four of her most elaborate critical articles,.-Goethe, Lives of the great Composers, Festus, and Bettine Brentanof translators, whether in reproducing the wise oracles of Goethe, or the girlish grace and daring originality of Bettine an
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Rosa Bonheur. (search)
er? That was something which did not meet the inmost bent and quality of her mind. Then it was that the remembrance of her early wanderings in the Bois de Boulogne came freshly to her. She recalled the long delights and delicious dreams that she had, as a child, in communion with open nature in the fields and woods, and she awoke to the fact that she was to be a painter of pastoral nature. Immediately, with the energy of will which she put into everything that she undertook, and which Goethe says makes the difference between the great and small mind, she began to study, not the painted classical landscapes, with their eternal mountains like mill-stones, and their Arcadian fountains covered with Greek inscriptions, but the streams, woods, fields, and mountains near at hand, of God's making, and covered with their living flocks and herds. Every morning Rosa departed with her painting apparatus, and some simple provision for her noontide meal, crossing the city barriers, and str
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. (search)
at all. French and Italian she readily mastered, and in time, leaving behind her the waste and weary land of German grammar, she came into such a shining inheritance of German literature as seemed to create in her new faculties of comprehension. Goethe and Schiller were her prophets and kings, and she received with large welcome the subtile philosophers of their speculative nation. While a school-girl she published first, a review of Lamartine's Jocelyn, with translations in English verse, and afterwards a more thoughtful review of Dwight's translation of the minor poems of Goethe and Schiller. So she grew to ripe girlhood,--reading, writing, dreaming; fiery within, as her warm tints and rich bright hair declared her, but cold without, under the repression of her education. To this day it is plain that she cannot easily reconcile her antagonisms. That her reason accepts the strictest formulas of life, her energetic intellect works well and thoroughly in the harness of existing
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