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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 31 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Louis M. Goldsborough or search for Louis M. Goldsborough in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
er, that Colonel Baker had desired that he should be substituted, and when objections were made he succeeded in overruling them [see p. 123]. After the battle between the Monitor and Merrimac [see Vol. I., p. 692], General Wool, seeing the advantage of opening the blockade of the James River, prepared for an attempt to recapture Norfolk. President Lincoln, with Secretaries Stanton and Chase, came to Fort Monroe, and on May 8th, 1862, the order was given and a movement made. Rear-Admiral Goldsborough, who had been ordered to assist, attacked the Confederate batteries at Sewell's Point retired, and for the hour, at least, the expedition was abandoned. News came to headquarters later in the day that General Huger was preparing to retire, and General Wool, after a trip to Willoughby's Point, decided to land his troops at Ocean View, thus taking in reverse the Confederate works. The landing of our troops was easily effected, and had more energy been displayed it is doubtful wheth
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
Yorktown,--as proved to be the case,--came down to Lee's Mills from the North, running parallel with and not crossing the road from Newport News to Williamsburg. It was also known that there were intrenched positions of more or less strength at Young's Mills, on the Newport News road, and at Big Bethel, Howard's Bridge, and Ship's Point, on or near the Hampton and Yorktown road, and at Williamsburg [see map, p. 188]. On my arrival at Fort Monroe, I learned, in an interview with Flag--Officer Goldsborough, that he could not protect the James as a line of supply, and that he could furnish no vessels to take an active part in the reduction of the batteries at York and Gloucester or to run by and gain their rear. He could only aid in the final attack after our land batteries had essentially silenced their fire. I thus found myself with 53,000 men in condition to move, faced by the conditions of the problem just stated. Information was received that Yorktown was already being reenf
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The navy in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
rs at Hampton Roads, was commanded by Flag-Officer Louis M. Goldsborough. The command included not only the ores will be taken to advise and strengthen Flag-Officer Goldsborough; but unless such be the case, I should be f April, and immediately communicated with Flag-Officer Goldsborough. The advance of the army was to begin at n at this time to have strenuously urged it, for Goldsborough afterward stated to the Committee on the Conduct on them by the navy. At McClellan's request Goldsborough sent 7 gun-boats under Commander William Smith isition between Sewell's Point and Newport News. Goldsborough, with the Minnesota, the Monitor, and other vessesence of a foreign ship-of-war, was suffered by Goldsborough because, in accordance with the wishes of the Den if an opportunity offered. According to Flag-Officer Goldsborough, the Merrimac came out, but was even more of the Chickahominy. On the 17th of May, Flag-Officer Goldsborough, in the Susquehanna, with the Wachusett, D