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William H. Noble Col. 17th Conn. InfantryFeb. 25, 1864, to Apr. 25, 1864. 1st Brigade, Ames' 1st Division, Department of the South Col. 17th Conn. InfantryJan. 15, 1864, to Jan. 23, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Brigade, Gordon's Division, Northern District, Department of the South Col. 17th Conn. InfantryJan. 28, 1864, to Feb., 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Brigade, Gordon's Division, Northern District, Department of the South Col. 17th Conn. InfantryJuly 29, 1864, to Aug. 4, 1864. District of Florst Brigade, Gordon's Division, Northern District, Department of the South Col. 17th Conn. InfantryJuly 29, 1864, to Aug. 4, 1864. District of Florida, Northern District--Folly Island and Morris Island, Department of the South Col. 17th Conn. InfantryJuly 4, 1863, to July 14, 1863. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 17th Conn. InfantryNov. 27, 1863, to Jan. 15, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Brigade, U. S. Forces South end of Folly Island., Department of the
A. Schimmelfenning Brigadier GeneralApr. 2, 1863, to July 1, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralAug. 16, 1863, to Oct. 24, 1863. 1st Brigade, U. S. Forces South end of Folly Island., Department of the South Brigadier GeneralFeb. 25, 1864, to Apr. 25, 1864. Gordon's Division, Northern District, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralFeb. 26, 1865, to Apr. 8, 1865. 1st Separate brigade, Morris and folly islands, Northern District--Folly Island and Morris Island, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralFeb. 5, 1863, to March 5, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralFeb., 1864, to March , 1864. Northern District, Department of the South Brigadier GeneralJan. 19, 1863, to Feb. 5, 1863. 3d Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJuly 1, 1863, to July 13, 1863. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier Ge
0, 1837, in Boston, was carefully educated at home and abroad in his earlier years, and admitted to Harvard College in August, 1856, but discontinued his course there in his third year. After a short business career, on April 19, 1861, he marched with his regiment, the Seventh New York National Guard, to the relief of Washington. He applied for and received a commission as second lieutenant in the Second Massachusetts Infantry; and after serving with his company and on the staff of Gen. George H. Gordon, he was promoted to a captaincy. Colonel Shaw was of medium height, with light hair and fair complexion, of pleasing aspect and composed in his manners. His bearing was graceful, as became a soldier and gentleman. His family connections were of the highest social standing, character, and influence. He married Miss Haggerty, of New York City, on May 2, 1863. Captain Shaw arrived in Boston on February 15, and at once assumed the duties of his position. Captain Hallowell was al
ork, for we were daily furnishing parties reporting to Lieut. P. S. Michie, United States Engineers, at the Left Batteries, and to Colonel Serrell at the Lookout. Fancied security of the Fifty-fourth camp so far from the front was rudely dispelled at dark on August 13 by a shell from James Island bursting near Surgeon Stone's tent. These unpleasant visits were not frequent, seemingly being efforts of the enemy to try the extreme range of their guns. Reinforcements, consisting of Gen. George H. Gordon's division from the Eleventh Corps, arrived on the 13th and landed on the 15th upon Folly Island. No rain fell from July 18 until August 13, which was favorable for the siege work, as the sand handled was dry and light. This dryness, however, rendered it easily displaced by the wind, requiring constant labor in re-covering magazines, bombproofs, and the slopes. The air too was full of the gritty particles, blinding the men and covering everything in camp. By this date twelve b
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
student; New York. Major 31 Mch 63, must. 11 Apl; Col 17 Apl 63, must. 13 May. Killed 18 Jly 63 Ft. Wagner. Other service:—Co. F 7th N. Y. Nat. Guard. 19 Apl 61; 2d Lt 2d Mass. 25 May 61; 1st Lt 8 Jly 62; Capt 10 Aug 62. A. D. C. to Gen. George H. Gordon. Hallowell, Edward Needles; Colonel. 3 Nov 36 Philadelphia; single; merchant; Medford. Capt Co. B 6 Mch 63, must. 30 Mch; Major 17 Apl 63, must. 13 May; Lt. Col. 31 May 63, must. 31 Jly; Col. 18 Jly 63, must. 1 Sep; Bvt. Brig Gensburg, Vt. 4 Jan 64; 20 Aug 65. —— Reported dead. Fuller, John C. 21, —— —— Woodstock, Vt. 5 Jan 64; 20 Aug 65. —— Rutland, Vt. Gaines, Alexander 20, sin.; porter; Pittsfield. 14 Dec 63; 20 Aug 65. Wounded 20 Feb 64 Olustee, Fla. $325. Gordon, Daniel 34 —— —— Burlington, Vt. 11 Dec 63; 20 Aug 65. —— Richmond, Va. Green, Frank W. 17, sin.; laborer; Woburn. 28 Sep 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Hamilton, Henry 24, sin.; farmer; Pittsfield. 15 Dec 63; died 4 Aug 65 Post
Line Brigade, 242. Gifford, John L., 282. Gilbert, Shepard D., 102. Gillmore Medal, 134. Gillmore, Quincy A., 46, 51, 52, 55, 68, 71, 72, 74, 101, 110, 112, 113, 114, 121, 127, 128, 129, 133, 134, 138, 141, 146, 148, 149, 150, 153, 155, 156, 157, 178, 185, 189, 274, 289, 290, 314, 315. Gilmore's Band, 31, 318. Gilmer, J. F., 150. Glasgow, Abraham, 168. Glassell, William T., 132. Golden Gate, steamer, 215, 237, 239. Gooding, J. H., 168, 173, 183. Goodwin, Frank, 201. Gordon, George H., 5, 109. Gospels, Copies of, 134, Gould plantation, 39, 44. Grace, James W., 9, 10, 34, 84, 105,144, 317. Graham's Neck, S. C., 262, 263, 264. Grahamville, S. C., 238, 239, 240. Grant, U. S., 140, 185, 288. Gray, W. H. W., 129. Greek fire, 145. Green, A. M., 12. Green, Fort, 134, 191, 192, 219, 234. Green, John, 304. Green Pond, S. C., 275. Green, Samuel A., 64. Gregg, Fort, 70, 111, 119, 121, 123, 128,, 134, 138, 139, 143, 194, 232, 314. Gregg, William, 312. Gregor
ed July 9, 1867, to me, says,— With regard to the preparations for war made by Governor Andrew, I recollect, for my part, collecting information respecting steamers, and reporting the names and capacities and whereabouts of all which plied between Boston and other ports, on Feb. 2, 1861. On Feb. 4, the Governor called a meeting at his chamber in the State House, at which were present some of the chief officers of the militia: also, General Thayer, of the United-States Engineers, and Messrs. Gordon and Andrews, ex-United-States-army officers, both major-generals of volunteers in the late war. I recorded the replies, and drew up a memorandum of the items of clothing, equipment, arms, and ammunition needed, to prepare the militia for service in the field. On Feb. 6, a second meeting was called by the Governor. I cannot remember distinctly how much of the discussion took place at the first, and what at the second; but the result of the two was, the Governor's order for two thousan
the war. He had written to the Secretary on the 17th on the subject, but had received no answer. He fully indorses the scheme, and hopes it may receive such assistance and co-operation from the United States as can with propriety be offered. Major Gordon, who will command the regiment, is a gentleman of careful military education and large executive ability; and it will be officered by such gentlemen as Mr. Andrews and Mr. Dwight, gentlemen of the best standing in Massachusetts. Writes to the and urge you to hold at the navy yard, or under your control, all naval officers who will not swear allegiance to the United-States Government, until instruction can be got from Washington. Writes to the Secretary of War, In addition to raising Gordon's regiment, we can send you four thousand more troops within a very short time after receipt of a requisition for them. Do you wish us to send men as we may get them ready, without waiting requisitions? What shall we do, or what do you wish us
te camp, as contemplated by the act of the Legislature, for drill and organization, was never established; but, instead thereof, temporary camps were formed in different parts of the State to accommodate the local demand. Thus it was, that the First Regiment, Colonel Cowdin, which was recruited in Boston and its immediate vicinity, was sent to Camp Cameron in North Cambridge, where it remained until June 15, when it was ordered to Washington. The Second Regiment, which was recruited by Colonel Gordon, and officers under his command, established a camp in West Roxbury, which was called Camp Andrew, in honor of the Governor. Governor Andrew determined that the regimental number should not be duplicated; hence it was, that the Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Regiments should retain their own designations, and should not be confounded with the three years regiments. Therefore the next three years regiment which was recruited by Colonel Couch at Camp Old Colony, near Taunton, was call
tified to me by the United States Adjutant-General, from headquarters, at Washington. But in no single instance has any such vacancy been so certified to me; and yet I am aware that many such vacancies exist, and I am continually entreated by Massachusetts commanders to make appointments to fill them. Within the past week, I have received notices from Major-General Butler, from Fort Monroe; from Colonels Couch, Cowdin, and Cass, and Lieutenant-Colonel Blaisdell, at Washington; and from Colonel Gordon and Major-General Banks, at Harper's Ferry,—of vacancies existing among the officers of their respective commands, and I am anxious to fill them, if I have the power to do so: for delay in filling them is prejudicial in various ways, which I need not mention. The letter had the desired effect; and from that time, when a vacancy occurred, the Governor was immediately notified of the fact by the Adjutant-General of the United States, and an appointment made to fill it. Aug. 17.—The
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