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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
fficial reports give an idea of the fighting. Rodes writes:— The total number of men carried into action was about 2200. The aggregate number present at camp was, however, 2587. The 6th Ala. lost nearly 60 per cent of its aggregate force. Some of its men were drowned after having been wounded, as they fought at times in a swamp in which the water was from six inches to two feet in depth. The right company of the 6th Alabama was thrown back at right angles to the line of battle by Col. Gordon, to protect his rear, and engaged the enemy at such close quarters that its brave commander, Capt. Bell, after having fallen wounded mortally, was able to use his revolver with effect upon the enemy. The company fought with great heroism. Its loss was 21 killed and 23 wounded out of a total of 55 (80 per cent). It remains to say a few words of the movements of the unengaged troops on the Williamsburg and Charles City roads. Longstreet at 3.30 P. M. placed Wilcox in charge of his own
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
The division fought heroically and well, but fought in vain. Garland, in my immediate front, showed all his wonted courage and enthusiasm, but he needed and asked for reenforcements. I sent Lt.-Col. Newton, 6th Ga., to his support, and, observing a brigade by a fence in our rear, I galloped back to it and found it to be that of Gen. Toombs. I ordered it forward to support Garland, and accompanied it. The brigade advanced handsomely to the brow of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gained considerable ground, but was forced back. The gallant and accomplished Meares, 3d N. C., Ripley's brigade, had fallen at the head of his regiment, and that brigade was streaming to the rear. Colquitt's and Anderson's brigades had also fallen back. Ransom's brigade had come up to my support from Gen. Huger. It moved too far to the left and became mixed up with a mass of troops near the parsonage on the Quaker road, suffering
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
of cavalry, and were greatest in Garnett's and Taliaferro's, of Jackson's division, slightly over 300 in each. The Federal losses were in eight brigades of infantry and one of cavalry. Crawford's brigade lost 857, Geary's 465, Prince's 452, and Gordon's 344. The fighting upon Jackson's left, where Garnett's and Taliaferro's brigades were broken by the charge of Crawford's and Gordon's brigades, and the line reestablished, by Branch's, Archer's, and Winder's brigades, was very desperate, as isGordon's brigades, and the line reestablished, by Branch's, Archer's, and Winder's brigades, was very desperate, as is shown by the casualties of some of the Federal regiments. Gen. Williams, in his official report, says: — The 3d Wis., especially, fell under a partial flank fire from the underbrush, and woods, which swept its right companies with great destruction, and under which Lt.-Col. Crane fell pierced with several fatal wounds, and the regiment was obliged to give way. The enemy was, however, driven out of the open field by the other regiments and some distance into the woods, where, being strongl
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
2d CorpsRichardsonCaldwell, Meagher, Brooke2 SumnerSedgwickGorman, Howard, Dana2 FrenchKimball, Morris, Weber3 5th CorpsMorellBarnes, Griffin, Stockton3 PorterSykesBuchanan, Lovell, Warren3 HumphreysHumphreys, Tyler, Allabach2 6th CorpsSlocumTorbert, Bartlett, Newton4 FranklinSmith, W. F.Hancock, Brooks, Irwin3 CouchDevens, Howe, Cochrane4 9th CorpsWillcox, O. B.Christ, Welsh2 BurnsideSturgisNagle, Ferrero2 RodmanFairchild, Harland1 CoxSeammon, Crook3 12 CorpsWilliamsCrawford, Gordon3 MansfieldGreeneTyndale, Stainrook, Goodrich4 CavalryPleasantonWhiting, Farnsworth, Rush, McReynolds, Davis4 Aggregate6 Corps, 19 Divisions54 Brigades, 300 Guns, 97,000 Men55 could defend himself, but the suggestion was not adopted by Miles, who felt himself obliged by his orders to hold the village itself. As Lee could not advance freely into Pennsylvania with Miles's force so close in his rear, he determined to capture the Harper's Ferry garrison. Discussing the matter with Longstree
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
2D corps, Jackson's A. P. Hill's10,400Heth, Thomas, Lane, McGowans, Archer, Pender626 Rodes's9,632Rodes, Colquitt, Ramseur, Doles, Iverson418 Early's8,243Gordon, Hoke, Smith, Hays418 Colston's6,629Paxton, Jones, Warren, Nichols418 900Corps' Reserve Artillery983 4 Divisions35,79519 Brigades27118 600General Reserve Artiered the withdrawal of his whole division, and the formation of a new line of battle across the Telegraph road, about two miles in the rear. Here he concentrated Gordon's, Hoke's, and Smith's brigades, with the remnants of Barksdale's. Hays's brigade had been cut off with Wilcox, and these two brigades were in position to delay Ses's Brig.6634328437 Ga. Colquitt's Brig.9128312449 N. C. Iverson's Brig.6733073470 N. C. Ramseur's Brig.151529108788 Rodes's Div.3831,8687092,9609,600 Ga. Gordon's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly wounded and missing.16145161 Va. Smith's Brig. From Report of Surgeon Guild, excluding slightly w
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
ould have made a more active and efficient corps commander than Ewell. Reorganized, the army stood as follows: — 1ST corps. Longstreet DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADE COMMANDERBATTS.guns McLaws7,311 Kershaw, Barksdale, Semmes, Wofford Pickett5,200 Garnett, Kemper, Armistead Hood7,720 Law, Robertson, Anderson, G. T. Benning Arty. Battns.1,000 Cabell, Dearing, Henry, Walton, Alexander2184 Totals21,231 11 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 2D corps. Ewell Early6,943 Hays, Smith, Hoke, Gordon Johnson5,564 Stuart, Walker, Nichols, Jones Rodes8,454 Daniel, Doles, Iverson, Ramseur, O'Neal Arty. Battns.1,000 Jones, Latimer, Carter, Brown, Nelson2184 Totals21,961 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2184 3D corps. A. P. Hill Anderson7,440Wilcox, Wright, Mahone, Perry, Posey Heth7,500Pettigrew, Brockenbrough, Archer, Davis Pender6,800Perrin, Lane, Thomas, Scales Arty. Battns.1,000Lane, Garnett, Poague, McIntosh, Pegram2080 Totals22,740 13 Brigades, 5 Battns. Arty.2080 65,932
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
ituation, the more strange it seems that Lee abandoned his first purpose to withdraw Johnson from his false position. Early's attack is next to be described. It, too, was isolated, inadequate, and unsupported. It necessarily failed. Both attacks were in progress at the same time, but Longstreet's, which they were intended to support, had already ceased. Like Johnson's division, Early was also short of one brigade, Smith's having been sent to guard the rear from the direction of York. Gordon also was not engaged, as Early soon realized that the attack was an isolated one and would be quickly repulsed. Early's report gives the following details: — . . . As soon as Johnson became warmly engaged, which was a little before dusk, I ordered Hays and Avery to advance and carry the works on the height in front. These troops advanced in gallant style to the attack, passing over the ridge in front of them under a heavy artillery fire, and then crossing a hollow between that and Ce
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
2747 Wofford30192112334 Cabell's Arty.82937 McLaws's Div.31315383272,178 Garnett78324539941 Armistead884606431,191 Kemper58356317731 Dearing's Arty.81725 Pickett's Div.2321,1571,4992,888 Law74276146496 Anderson, G. T.10551254671 Robertson84393120597 Benning76299122497 Henry's Arty.42327 Hood's Div.3431,5044422,289 Alexander's Arty.191146139 Washington Arty.3261645 Reserve Arty.2214022184 Aggregate 1st Corps9104,3392,2907,539 Hays3620176313 Hoke3521694345 Smith1211317142 Gordon7127039380 Jones's Arty.268 Early's Div.1568062261,188 Steuart83409190682 Nichols4330936388 Stonewall3520887330 Jones5830261421 Latimer's Arty.104050 Johnson's Div.2291,2693751,873 Confederate casualties. Gettysburg. Approximate by brigades COMMANDSKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Daniel165635116916 Iverson130328308820 Doles2412431179 Ramseur2312232177 O'Neal73430193696 Carter's Arty.6352465 Rodes's Div.4211,7287042,853 Brown's Arty.31922 Nelson's Arty. Reserve Arty.31922 2d
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
, F.LomaxWickham20 Guns Lee, W. H. F.ChamblissGordon Our narrative may pause for a bird's-eye vmade upon an exposed flank of the 6th corps by Gordon, of Early's division, which will be described the day's misfortunes with a brief account of Gordon's attack upon the right of the 6th corps, comm had been discovered by scouts and reported to Gordon by 9 A. M. Gordon had verified it by personal s in support of the right of the 6th. In vain Gordon answered that observation showed it was not thhe pressure on our right? Ewell, Early, and Gordon all happened to be present. Gordon's proposalGordon's proposal was mentioned, and Early vigorously combated it. Lee listened in grim silence to his reasons for nodiers and several hundred men being captured. Gordon's casualties were very small and a large propod on his right and Early's division, now under Gordon, in reserve. The fighting along the lines lasments coming from the brigades of Johnston and Gordon on the right, and from Daniel and Ramseur on t[4 more...]
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
ppomattox River on Grant's right, and assigned Gordon to command the assault which was to be made Mae weak spots from which men had been drawn for Gordon's attack. Much sharp fighting resulted at manbout nine miles to our right from the point of Gordon's attack. Here, opposite a fort called Fort Fllision. Lee arranged during the evening with Gordon and Fitz-Lee, who had the advance, that they snable to Gordon to inquire how he progressed. Gordon's answer was:— Tell Gen. Lee I have fought delay his movements. In Longstreet's front Gordon had all the morning been engaged with Sheridanand unconditional surrender of the army, which Gordon refused. Custer said: — Sheridan directs ed and can annihilate your command in an hour. Gordon replied: — There is a flag between Lee andrdon says, Custer rode off with Maj. Hunter of Gordon's staff, asking to be guided to Longstreet's pr line. The last cannon shot was fired from Gordon's lines under orders to cease firing, conveyed[8 more...