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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
rge W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Dan. W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. T. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villere, J. W. Moore, Lucius J. Dupre, John D. C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, Wm. Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnson, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, O. R. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. W. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. DeJarnette, H. C. Chambers, Thomas Menees, S. A. Miller, James M. Baker, Robert W. Barnwell, A. G. Brown, Henry C. Burnett, Allen T. Caperton, John B. Clark, Clement C. Clay, William T. Dortch, Landon C. Haynes, Gustavus A. Henry, Benjamin H. Hill, R. M. T. Hunter, Robert Jemison, Jr.; Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia; Robert W. Johnson, of Arkansas; Wal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Attack on Fort Gilmer, September 29th, 1864. (search)
de up of clerks and attaches of the different departments of the Government); Gary's brigade of cavalry, the Louisiana guard artillery, Hardaway's battalion of artillery, consisting of four batteries, four guns each; the Rockbridge artillery, Captain Graham; Third company Richmond howitzers, Lieutenant Carter; the Powhatan artillery, Captain Dance, and the Salem artillery, Captain Griffin. These commands included all the troops engaged during the whole day, I think. The whole force was commandeand was manned by about forty men (of what command I never knew). Between Forts Harrison and Gilmer, a distance of nearly half a mile, were stationed Hardaway's batteries, Dance's being the nearest to Fort Harrison, Griffin's next, and Carter and Graham to their left, supported by the Texans and Tennesseans, with the City battalion deployed as skirmishers. General Ewell was with the skirmish line, constantly encouraging them by his presence and coolness. I remember very distinctly how he looke
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
post held by the Unionists — even St. Louis itself — was menaced with real danger. To avert the perils threatening Bird's Point and Cairo, Fremont secretly and quickly prepared an expedition to strengthen the latter post; for General Prentiss, its commander, had not more than twelve hundred men in garrison there at the close of July. Mustering about thirty-eight hundred troops on board of eight steamers, Empress, War Eagle, Jennie Dean, Warsaw, Oity of Alton, Louisiana, Jeanuary, and Graham. General Fremont and Staff were on the City of Alton. The squadron was in charge of Captain B. Able. at St. Louis, on the night of the 30th of July, he left that city at noon the next day with the entire squadron, and making a most imposing display. Nobody but himself knew the real strength of the expedition, and the most exaggerated rumors concerning it went abroad. The loyal people and the insurgents believed that these vessels contained at least twelve thousand men. The deception had it
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
. North Carolina--*W. N. H. Smith, Robert R. Bridgers, Owen R. Keenan, T. D. McDowell, Thomas S. Ashe, Arch. H. Arrington, Robert McClean, William Lander, B. S. Gaither, A. T. Davidson. South Carolina--*John McQueen, *W. Porcher miles, L. M. Ayer, *Milledge L. Bonham, James Farrow, *William W. Boyce. Tennessee--Joseph T. Heiskell, William G. Swan, W. H. Tebbs, E. L. Gardenshire, *Henry S. Foote, *Meredith P. Gentry, *George W. Jones, Thomas Meneese, *J. D. C. Atkins, *John V. Wright, David M. Currin. Texas--*John a Wilcox, *C. C. Herbert, Peter W. Gray, B. F. Sexton, M. D. Graham, Wm. B. Wright. Virginia--*M. R. H. Garnett, John R. Chambliss, James Lyons, *Roger A. Pryor, *Thomas S. Bococke, John Goode, Jr., J. P. Holcombe, *D. C. De Jarnett, *William Smith, *A. E. Boteler, John R. Baldwin, Walter R. Staples, Walter Preston, Albert G. Jenkins, Robert Johnson, Charles W. Russell. those marked with the * had been members of the United States Congress. tail-piece — Congreve rocke
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
charged the Confederates on the right of Caldwell, that they were repulsed and scattered in great confusion. and a charge of the Confederates directly on Richardson's front was quickly repulsed. The National line was steadily advanced until the foe was pushed back to Dr. Piper's house, near the Sharpsburg road, which formed a sort of citadel for them, and there they made an obstinate stand. Richardson's artillery was now brought up, and while that brave leader was directing the fire of Captain Graham's battery, he was felled by a ball that proved fatal. General Richardson was taken to McClellan's Headquarters (Pry's), where he died after suffering seven weeks. General W. S. Hancock succeeded him in command, when a charge was made that drove the Confederates from Piper's in the utmost confusion, and only the skillful show of strength by a few of his fresh troops prevented a fatal severance of Lee's line. D. H. Hill, in his report, speaking of the struggle at this point, declared
Doc. 57.-General Graham's expedition. General Butler's despatch. Fortress Monroe, Va., January 25, 1864. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: sir: Brigadier-General Graham, by my dirBrigadier-General Graham, by my direction, went with three armed transports and a competent force to the Peninsula, made a landing on the James River, seven miles below Fort Powhatan, known as the Brandon Farms, and captured twenty-twoy gunboats Gen. Jessup, Smith Briggs, and Flora Temple. The whole was under the command of General Graham. Before daylight, on the following morning, the boats had proceeded as far up the James Rivhe men in two bodies, Captain Lee assigned one of them to remain with Lieutenant Bullard, of General Graham's staff, in front of the station, while he with his squad marched around to the rear. Theptures are fully worth twenty thousand dollars. The expedition reflects great credit upon General Graham and Captain Lee, and all the officers and men engaged in it, when we take into consideration
irney and General Humphreys, Sickles rode off to the rear to headquarters. Before he had reached there, the sound of cannon announced that the battle had begun. Hastening rapidly on, he was met by General Meade at the door of his quarters, who said: General, I will not ask you to dismount; the enemy are engaging your front; the council is over. It was an unfortunate moment, as it proved, for a council of war. Sickles, putting spurs to his horse, flew back to his commad, and, finding that Graham's brigade was not advanced as far as he desired, he was pushing that brigade and a battery forward about a hundred yards, when General Meade at length arrived on the field. The following colloquy ensued, which I gathered from several officers present: Are you not too much extended, General? said Meade. Can you hold this front? Yes, replied Sickles, until more troops are brought up; the enemy are attacking in force, and I shall need support. General Meade then let drop some remark, showi
C. J. Munnerlyn, Thomas S. Ashe, O. R. Singleton, J. L. Pugh, A. H. Arrington, Walter R. Staples, A. R. Boteler, Thomas J. Foster, W. R. Smith, Robert J. Breckinridge, John M. Martin, Porter Ingram, A. A. Garland, E. S. Dargan, D. Funsten, Thomas D. McDowell, J. R. McLean, R. R. Bridges, G. W. Jones, B. S. Gaither, George W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Daniel W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. J. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villers, J. W. Moore, Lucien J. Dupre, John C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, William Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnston, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, A. H. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. M. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. De Jarnette, H. C. Chambers.
the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication wit Longstreet. As soon as the Clynch. River became fordable after the rain, Colonel Graham's brigade crossed and encountered the enemy. On the sixth of December, tn's Gap Roads, and, joined General Shackleford in the rear of the enemy. Colonel Graham, commanding the Second brigade, Second division of cavalry, reports that heconsiderable cavalry force was approaching, with a view of surrounding him, Colonel Graham, at midnight, fell back to Walker's Ford, leaving company M, Fifth Indiana mmand of Major-General Martino. The enemy intended to surround and capture Colonel Graham's command, but was foiled in his purpose. The enemy's loss was admitted -general was killed; and Captain----, who led the charge, was also killed. Colonel Graham speaks in the highest terms of the unflinching courage and steadiness of hi
h he soon after attacked with great vigor, compelling our force to slowly retire some hundred yards. The action now became lively, and the loss of the day was seriously apprehended; but Colonel Robinson, sabre in hand, cheered on the men, and the gallant fellows, many of them without a shot in their guns, rushed forward and drove the enemy into the woods and off the field. The day was won, but with severe loss in both officers and men. Captain Moss, of the First Louisiana cavalry, and Lieutenants Graham and Meader, of the Eighty-seventh Illinois mounted infantry, together with several privates, were wounded, and six or seven privates were killed. Colonel Lucas, with his First cavalry brigade, closely followed by Colonel Robinson, with his Third cavalry brigade, pursued the enemy several miles, as far as Carroll's saw-mill, where he found them drawn up on a wooded hill, with four guns in position. Heavy infantry and artillery firing continued until nightfall, when, in the dusk of t
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