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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 2 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
lishers, however, were less active than importers, for diaries and library catalogues show that British editions were on many shelves. The Southern and Middle colonies may have read more novels than did New England, yet Jonathan Edwards himself, whose savage quarrel with the Northampton congregation had arisen partly over the licentious books [possibly Pamela, among others] which some of the younger members employed to promote lascivious and obscene discourse, was later enchanted by Sir Charles Grandison. Edwards did not relent in advance of the general public. After the Revolution the novel-reading habit grew, fostered by American publishers and cried out against by many moralists whose cries appeared in magazines side by side with moral tales. Nearly every grade of sophistication applied itself to the problem. It was contested that novels were lies; that they served no virtuous purpose; that they melted rigorous minds; that they crowded out better books; that they painted adv
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 153 Sheppard Lee, 311 Sherman, Roger, 148 Sherman, General W. T., 317 Shipley, Bishop, 91 Shippen, Joseph, 122 Shirley, Governor, 106 Sidney, Algernon, 105, i18 Sievers, 275 Sigismund of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 113 Silsbee, Joshua, 227 Simms, W. G., 224 n., 231, 307, 308, 312-318, 319, 324 Simonides, 359 Simple Cobbler of Aggawam, the, 39 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 60 Sir Charles Grandison, 284 Sketch Book, 240, 248, 249, 251, 255-256 Sketches from a student's Window, 240 Sketches of history, 318 Skinner, Otis, 223 Sky-walk, 288, 291 Slaves in Algiers, 226 Slender's journey, 182 Smith, Adam, 91, 97 Smith, Elihu Hubbard, 288, 290 Smith, Horace, 281 Smith, James, 281 Smith, Capt., John, 2, 15-18, 19, 225 Smith, Melanchthon, 148 Smith, Samuel, 27 Smith, Sydney, 206, 207, 208 Smith, Rev. William (1721-1803), 85, 122, 123, 216 Smith, Will
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, I. A Cambridge boyhood (search)
literature and history of the eighteenth century; and most of these I read. There was a fine set of Dr. Johnson's works in a dozen volumes, with an early edition of Boswell; all of Hoole's Tasso and Ariosto; a charming little edition of the British essayists, with pretty woodcuts; Bewick's Birds and Quadrupeds; Raynal's Indies; the Anti-Jacobin; Plutarch's Lives; Dobson's Life of Petrarch; Marshall's and Bancroft's Lives of Washington; Miss Burney's and Miss Edgeworth's works; and Sir Charles Grandison. There were many volumes of sermons, which my mother was fond of reading,--she was, I think, the last person who habitually read them,--but which I naturally avoided. There were a good many pretty little Italian books, belonging to one of my elder sisters, and a stray volume of Goethe which had been used by another. In out-of-the-way closets I collected the disused classical textbooks of my elder brothers, and made a little library to be preserved against that magic period when I
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
ge of, 135. Fuller, Margaret, 12, 77, 91, 92. Gardner, Joseph, 233. Garfield, J. A., 349. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, 220. Garrison, W. L., 97, 116, 125, 126, 127, 135, 139, 242, 327- Gasparin, Madame de, 266. Geary, J. W., 203, 205, 206. German influence on American thought, 188. Gibbon, Edward, 91, 358. Giles, Henry, 175. Gillmore, Q. A., 262. Goethe, J. F. W. von, 15, 42, 194, 348. Goodell, John, 251. Goodhue, J. M., 247. Gosse, Edmund, 289. Graeme, Christie, 233. Grandison, Sir, Charles, 15. Green, J. H., 102. Greene, W. B., 107, 175. Grenville, Tom, 166. Grimes, Mr., 143. Giinderode, Caroline von, 92, 93. Habersham, W. N., 18. Haggard, Rider, 273. Hale, E. E., 53, 175, 193, 194 Hale family, the, 75. Hall, A. O., 108. Hall, Fitzedward, 53. Hamel, M., 321. Hanway, James, 208. Harbinger, the, 101. Hardy, Thomas, 273, 352. Harrington, Mrs., 86. Harris, T. W., 56. Harvard University in 1837, 44; improvements in morals and manners, 46; elective sys
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
Mr. Higginson lived and preached in Worcester for about ten years before the Civil War called him away. Extracts from journals and letters of this period are apt to be undated and fragmentary and are often arranged according to subject rather than date. They are not chronicles of Worcester life, but rather a record of absences. To an old parishioner: Worcester, June. . . . We are kept sound asleep all the time by the heavy scent of roses and pinks and syringas. Add to this Sir Charles Grandison in seven small volumes, and you will understand what Lotos-Eaters we have become. Did you ever read Sir Charles ? It is a new experience to me and surpasses my best hopes. The heroines write as many letters every day as you write Sundays. Sir Charles, I find, to be a human being, whose grandeurs and graces fill me with reverence. And Lady G. you would find a piece of wickedness to whom you would instantly swear eternal friendship. Her matrimonial squabbles are as fresh and mode
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
7. Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, returns to Cambridge, 1-5; at Newburyport, 5-43; conversation with Whittier, 7-11; on immigrants, 14; Samuel Johnson, 14-17, 51; religious ideas, 15-17; Christmas celebration, 17-19; slavery attitude, 19, 67; resignation of, 19-22; at Artichoke Mills, 22-43; at Isles of Shoals, 24-27; and Hurlbut, 29-33; at Brattleboroa, 37,38; lecturing, 38, 45, 47-50, 56-58, 66, 72, 92-102, 253; and temperance, 41, 42, 55, 56, 80; at Worcester, 44-182, 221-23; on Sir Charles Grandison, 44, 45; and H. W. Beecher, 45-48; and Samuel Longfellow, 47-49; exchanges pulpits, 51, 52, 59; and Theodore Parker, 53, 54; and Lucy Stone, 55, 59-63; and Mrs. Chapman, 68, 69; and Anthony Burns, 68, 81; and Stephen Foster, 69, 70; arrested, 70; and the Quakers, 73-77; and disunion, 77-79; and Barnum, 80, 81; and the John Browns, 77, 84-88; and Sanborn, 86; preaching, 91; notes on contemporaries, 93, 94; in Canada, 94-101; and Harriet Prescott, 103-11; and Thoreau, 105; and Emerson,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
grees with us exactly about the present position of affairs in America, and understands them better than anybody I have seen since I came from home. After I came home, we had a visit from Tocqueville, as agreeable as ever. Then I drove out to Macaulay's, who seemed uncommonly glad to see me, and talked after his fashion for half an hour, with great richness and knowledge, chiefly on female beauty, which, by the most curious citations from Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's Letters, from Sir Charles Grandison, Congreve's Plays, and such out of-the-way places, he proved had greatly increased in England since the disappearance of small-pox. It was very amusing, but the first rush, as he comes down upon you, is like a shower-bath, or rather like a waterspout. But you will remember. Only, I think, his manner grows a little more declamatory. On my way back I stopped at Holland House, and again met Tocqueville, and two or three agreeable people. But I could not stop long. The old house