Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3. You can also browse the collection for U. S. Grant or search for U. S. Grant in all documents.

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of the first day's battle at Nashville reached Grant as he stepped from the steamer at Washington, n Pike. Distance, about eight miles. To this Grant replied at midnight: Your despatch of this evehe fleet, and invested Savannah. On the 18th, Grant congratulated both his generals. To Shermannews of the victory, he telegraphed at once to Grant: Just arrived. . . People here jubilant over This, it has been seen, was the opinion of both Grant and Sherman; and Schofield wrote, on the 27th ce, he had not the army in front of Hood which Grant expected and Sherman had arranged. I did nogy, although it would never have been his own, Grant found no positive fault; for it was possible tndent on those in Tennessee— it was then that Grant became, first, disturbed, and finally, peremptent, and for a while endangered the success of Grant's plans elsewhere—and all of this might have b destined to reap such a harvest of fame. But Grant's confidence in his ability was one reason why[11 more...]<
of march delight of country dispatches from Grant Sherman ordered to embark his army for Richmootest of Porter Butler sails for Fort Monroe Grant's dispatch to President Butler's disobediencessary failure Porter's dispatches chagrin of Grant Second expedition determined on secrecy Butll require to obtain transportation by sea. Grant, however, had already ascertained that the req Confederacy. But I will not anticipate. General Grant is expected here this morning, and will prno doubt they are all safely off. Butler to Grant, December 27. On the 27th, he arrived at Fort heir peremptory character. The order of General Grant to General Butler, which I saw published iace. A copy of this letter was forwarded to Grant, together with the substance of various other intimation of the renewal of the expedition. Grant simply telegraphed him on the 2nd of January: firmed as major-general of volunteers, and, on Grant's nomination, appointed brigadier-general in t[45 more...]
s supplies from Wilmington— communicates with Grant Hardee crosses Sherman's front to join Beaurenders, Halleck was then instructed to say: General Grant's wishes, however, are that this whole mated navigation impossible for several weeks. Grant early notified Sherman of this co-operation, astituted an object of primal importance, which Grant was far more anxious to accomplish than the capital. If Lee should succeed in escaping from Grant, and, reinforced by Beauregard's command, strichofield to move, and, on the 8th of February, Grant said to that commander: The quicker you can br Stoneman start on his expedition? Although Grant believed that Sherman would be perfectly safe but accomplishing no important interruption to Grant's plans. He was finally brought to battle on hile Sheridan resumed his old command close to Grant, an arrangement welcome to both soldiers, and assage between the Pamunkey and the James; for Grant was watching and protecting and supplying Sher[125 more...]
ions of Grant and Sheridan characteristics of Grant's strategy situation, March 30th Sheridan ornce of following up a repulse of the enemy. Grant was thus persisting in the plan he had adoptedn the report of the first assault arrived; and Grant at once notified Gibbon, who had been left in istener. Sheridan, however, said nothing, and Grant immediately remarked: Although I have providedA. M., and the Second at six. At nine o'clock Grant left City Point by the military railroad. Thewho had the right took the great trooper in to Grant, and urged the general to listen to his talk. corps he had never at this time commanded. Grant replied at once: It will be impossible to giveforce in conjunction with Miles. Meanwhile, Grant was preparing to support Warren on the other ff March, he had given great dissatisfaction to Grant. He seemed never to comprehend his instructions of Lee and the objective point indicated by Grant. The promptness and audacity with which, when[100 more...]
o the Appomattox correspondence with Sherman Grant's dispositions on night of April 2nd Lee orde from the word go. When this was reported to Grant, he said: I like the way Wright talks. It arg now notified of the movement. An attack,said Grant, is ordered for four in the morning at three pary, Vol. II, p. 465. at the very moment when Grant was massing his forces to deal his heaviest blaster at Five Forks. He still had in front of Grant, between the Appomattox and the Claiborne roadmphreys also was ordered to advance. At 6.40, Grant sent his first dispatch to City Point, for the who it was that had organized their victory. Grant galloped along, staying neither for prisoners ds north of the river. The only question with Grant was, whether at once to assault the inner lineolonel Ely is in possession of Petersburg; and Grant instantly replied: You will march immediately possible. Lincoln, however, arrived before Grant had left the town, and the two had a short int[53 more...]
appreciate the necessity of rapid movement. Grant was still at Jetersville, to be as near as posSheridan, early on the 8th, sent a dispatch to Grant, with information derived from Merritt, who wad, and at 9.20 P. M. sent information back to Grant. If General Gibbon and the Fifth corps can ges his apology; but the apology is required. Grant was more direct. He knew what he was aiming a unless he quickly submitted to whatever terms Grant chose to impose, he and every man in his army negotiating. The dispatch that he wrote to Grant on the 9th was in these words: I received yourng whom were Sheridan, Ord, and the members of Grant's own staff. No rebel entered the room but Le these to be distributed among the prisoners? Grant, however, informed him that this train had beeerted them when they most needed aid. When Grant broke camp at City Point on the 29th of March,my. When this movement commences, continued Grant, I shall move out by my left with all the forc[156 more...]
ssible moment. The instructions of Lincoln to Grant on the 3rd of March, communicated by Stanton,—Stanton to Grant, March 3d. See page 401. and Grant was ordered to proceed immediately to Sherman'iled among the loyal people at the North. But Grant made it his especial duty to vindicate his grenesty until he had ascertained in advance that Grant would recommend it. The wife of Jefferson Davietirement of his home. When the war was over, Grant had fought and beaten every important rebel sowhere it could be reached by no rebel army. Grant's greatness consisted in his perception of thiosed by soldiers like Sherman and Sheridan and Grant, their strength was wasted, their struggles va was left. This had been so securely held by Grant that Lee had not dared to dispatch any force tbefore Petersburg, when he sought to overwhelm Grant's left in the extending movements, he invariabn. The former rebel chief at once appealed to Grant, who went in person to the President, and prot[46 more...]
omac. It was stated, however, that the garrisons of Harper's Ferry, Charleston, Martinsburg, and other points, together with escorts to trains, were of sufficient size to reduce the force in the field to the numbers given in Sheridan's report to Grant, which were taken at the time from the official returns of effective or fighting strength present for duty. But as these returns were never sent to Washington, and were destroyed as above stated, it was impossible to furnish copies of them. Aere of sufficient size to reduce the force in the field to the numbers given in Sheridan's report to Grant, which were taken at the time from the official returns of effective or fighting strength present for duty. But as these returns were never sent to Washington, and were destroyed as above stated, it was impossible to furnish copies of them. At Grant's Headquarters it was always understood that Sheridan's effective force in the Valley campaign was about thirty thousand men. —Author
ntends doing—whether he will move across the Ridge, send a part of his force to Grant, or content himself with protecting the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. If he movn the east of the mountains. But what shall I do if he sends reinforcements to Grant, or remains in the lower Valley? He has laid waste nearly all of Rockingham anta for my supplies, and they are not abundant there. Sheridan's purpose, under Grant's orders, has been to render the Valley untenable by our troops by destroying purposes if he should contemplate moving across the Ridge, or sending troops to Grant. On the 13th I made a reconnoissance in force beyond Strasburg, and found the ithout compensating benefits. The Sixth corps had already begun to move off to Grant, and my movement brought it back, and Sheridan's forces are now so shattered that he will not be able to send Grant any efficient aid for some time. I think he will be afraid to trust the Eighth and Nineteenth corps. The enemy's loss in kill
Appendix to Chapter XXVIII. General Halleck to General Grant. Washington, D. C., October 2, 1864. Lieutenant-General Grant, City Point: General: Some time since General Sherman asked my opinion in regard to his operations after the capture of Atlanta. While free to give advice to the best of my ability, I felt it my Lieutenant-General Grant, City Point: General: Some time since General Sherman asked my opinion in regard to his operations after the capture of Atlanta. While free to give advice to the best of my ability, I felt it my duty to refer him to you for instructions, not being advised of your views on that subject. I presume, from his dispatches, that you have corresponded upon the subject, and perhaps his plan of future operations has already been decided upon. At one time he seemed most decidedly of opinion that he ought to operate by Montgomery Stanton.—(telegram.) New York, November 4, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: When I saw you a fortnight ago to-morrow, you told me you would ask General Grant to send me five thousand troops, of which I informed you I wished to place three thousand on the frontier, not only in reference to threatened attack, but to s
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