hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 604 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 570 8 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 498 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 456 2 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 439 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 397 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 368 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 368 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 334 0 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 330 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Ulysses S. Grant or search for Ulysses S. Grant in all documents.

Your search returned 251 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
Army of the Cumberland. Ambrose E. Burnside, second lieutenant Third Regiment of Artillery, afterward commanded the Army of the Potomac at the battle of Fredericksburg, December, 1862. John Gibbon, second lieutenant Fourth Regiment of Artillery, afterward commanded the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the battle of Gettysburg. George Sykes, first lieutenant Third Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the battle of Gettysburg. Ulysses S. Grant, second lieutenant Fourth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commander-in-chief United States Army and President of the United States. Lewis A. Armistead, first lieutenant Sixth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded a brigade in Pickett's charge at the battle of Gettysburg and was wounded and died within the Union lines. Edward Johnson, first lieutenant Sixth Regiment of Infantry, afterward commanded a division in the Army of Northern Virginia at the battle of Gettysburg. Winf
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
glorious? The surrender of Fort Henry on the Tennessee River, February 6, 1862. The Federal troops under Brigadier-General U. S. Grant, and the gun-boats under Commodore A. H. Foote, defeated the Confederate troops under Brigadier-General Tilghelson. Fort Donelson, twelve miles from Fort Henry, captured February 16, 1862. The Federal forces, under Brigadier-General U. S. Grant and Commodore A. H. Foote, defeated the Confederate troops under General J. B. Floyd. Federal loss, killed, us news from the West and Southwest. Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, April 6 and 7, 1862. Federal troops under Major-General U. S. Grant defeated the Confederate troops under General Beauregard. Federal loss, killed, wounded, and missing, 13,047 (my. We have to-day the glorious news from Grant. Vicksburg, Miss., invested by the Federal troops under Major-General Ulysses S. Grant. Confederate troops under General John C. Pemberton. It is in sad contrast with our miserable fiasco here, t
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
Sixth Corps, posted between the divisions of Barnes and Ayres, continuing the line on to Round Top. In advance of these, McCandless's brigade of Pennsylvania reserves, of the Fifth Corps, and Nevin's brigade, of the Sixth Corps, still hold the ground to the Wheat Field. On the extreme left, with its right on Big Round Top, its line facing south, at right angles to the general position of the army, posted athwart, and guarding the approaches to the rear by the Taneytown Road, is Wright, with Grant's and Russell's brigades, of the Sixth Corps. The other two brigades of the Sixth Corps, Shaler's and Eustis's, were in reserve on the left. Robinson's division, of the First Corps, is in reserve on the right, back of Cemetery Hill, ready, if needed, to support the Twelfth Corps on its front. What remains of the Third Corps is held in reserve near the left centre. Gregg's and Kilpatrick's divisions of the cavalry are on the extreme right flank of the army, the former on the Baltimore P
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
Times, in which there is a scathing article on Grant, Sherman, McPherson, Schofield and myself, andhe ceremonies, and after spending an hour with Grant, we returned home in the rain. I borrowed an ington I had a long and satisfactory talk with Grant, who has expressed himself and acted towards m any unfriendly feelings towards me. To-day Grant reviewed the Sixth Corps (Sedgwick's). It was sing sun by certain officers in this army; but Grant behaves very handsomely, and immediately referhis field yesterday, having been placed by General Grant in command of all the troops in front of Pving anything on which to base his remarks. Grant has gone to Washington, leaving Butler in commeeming injustice to me, and he at once, at General Grant's suggestion, ordered the Secretary to mak expressing a wish to go to Washington. After Grant had admitted them, he received a telegram from beautiful one and the roads in fine order. Mrs. Grant accompanied them and seemed as much pleased [188 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
consequence, under instructions from Lieutenant-General Grant, orders were issued to the commanding the rank of general was created, and Lieutenant-General Grant promoted to fill the position, and Ma and in November, 1868, he was elected. General Grant's occupation of the presidential chair, whons. It seemed to be well understood that General Grant would not resign his position in the army,he commission. As, however, the time of General Grant's inauguration as President approached, ite, and which received the full approval of General Grant. It is hard to conceive, therefore, in view of General Grant's recognition of General Meade's brilliant services, that he could have medi family in Philadelphia. The rumors as to General Grant's contemplated action had by this time bece reflection would bring justice in its train, Grant's later course of action, far wider-reaching t positions, no more battles to be fought. General Grant may have felt then, what he had said a few[14 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 9 (search)
Appendix B: correspondence between General Halleck and General Meade, after the battle of Gettysburg, July 7-10, 1863, mentioned in letter of July 10, 1863. see page 133, Vol. II Halleck to Meade: July 7. I have received from the President the following note, which I respectfully communicate. Maj. Gen. Halleck We have certain information that Vicksburg surrendered to Genl. Grant on the 4th of July. Now, if Gen. Meade can complete this work, so gloriously prosecuted thus far, by the literal or substantial destruction of Lee's Army the rebellion will be over. Yours truly A. Lincoln. Halleck to Meade: July 7, 8.45 P. M. You have given the enemy a stunning blow at Gettysburg, follow it up and give him another before he can cross the Potomac. When he crosses circumstances will determine whether it will be best to pursue him by the Shenandoah Valley or this side of Blue Ridge. There is strong evidence that he is short of Artillery ammunition and if vigo
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix F (search)
interruption from Gen. Meade, or serious effort to penetrate his design. Suggestions were made and heard, to send a force above the rebel position, when by cutting trees and throwing them into the river, his pontoons or other bridges might be swept away. But Gen. Meade's frequently declared belief was, that Lee could cross when he pleased; that he did not intend to cross, but meant to fight. The sequel shows how completely he was deceived. Had Gen. Meade possessed the activity of either Grant or Rosecrans, and, I may add, of Hooker, he could, by a cavalry reconnaissance on the south side of the Potomac, and a forced one on the Maryland side, have easily discovered Lee's true intentions; and had he attacked him with his army divided by that river, he must have inevitably destroyed or captured one half of it. But blinded and deceived by Lee, timidity ruled the hour, and the golden opportunity, that is only to be seen and grasped by genius, was lost forever. Here, then, we have a c
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 16 (search)
ed of General Meade. The spring campaign is about to open—who is better fitted to lead the Army of the Potomac than he who led it to victory at Gettysburg, and has since kept its honor bright? We have changed commanders too often; with the exception of General Meade, each change has been for the worse. We tried Burnside, Pope, Hooker, and found each of them wanting. There was no victory between those of Antietam and Gettysburg. It is due to the general who won the latter that he should have a chance to share the honors of the triumphs which we hope are awaiting our armies in the coming campaign. This is no time for experiments. And so long as we have got a good commander—one, too, who has proved himself such—we should stand by him; certainly we should not remove him to gratify the pique of any man or any set of men. General Grant was given a fair trial after the disaster at Belmont and Shiloh. Shall not as much be granted to General Meade, who as yet has met with no dis
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix O (search)
r than to force Lee's whole army to an unconditional surrender at Williamsport, where he was without ammunition or subsistence, and the swollen Potomac preventing his escape. It was stated that our army was so humiliated at the vacillation and timidity of General Meade on this occasion that many of them shed tears and talked of throwing down their arms. Yet General Meade still commands this noble army, and not only that, but he has lately ventured to break up, under shallow pretexts two of its finest corps, and dismiss some of its most heroic officers, Pleasanton, Sykes and others. It will be an important inquiry for the Committee on the Conduct of the War to ascertain by whose influence General Meade exercises such arbitrary power. This vital and dangerous act was carried out without any consultation with General Grant and may we not hope, that for his own sake and the country's sake he will wield the authority which belongs to him, else the worst is to be feared. Historicus.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix P (search)
hia Inquirer, June 2, 1864) Meade's position He is as much the commander of the Army of the Potomac as he ever was. Grant plans and exercises a supervisory control over the army, but to Meade belongs everything of detail. He is entitled to grn dictated by him. In battle he puts troops in action and controls their movements; in a word, he commands the army. General Grant is here only because he deems the present campaign the vital one of the war, and wishes to decide on the spot all ques General-in-Chief. History will record, but newspapers cannot, that on one eventful night during the present campaign Grant's presence saved the army, and the nation too; not that General Meade was on the point to commit a blunder unwittingly, be nation too; not that General Meade was on the point to commit a blunder unwittingly, but his devotion to his country made him loth to risk her last army on what he deemed a chance. Grant assumed the responsibility and we are still on to Richmon
1 2