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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 47 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
nd Petersburg and on the retreat. General Lee was at that time confronted by Grant at the Rapidan. General W. H. C. Whiting was placed in command of the defenceshich to attack and conquer Butler, gain City Point, cross the James, and attack Grant's on the left and rear, whilst Lee should attack him in front. Thus Grant woulGrant would have been cut off from the James below Richmond, Petersburg would have been relieved, and Grant's force of about 120,000 then could have been assailed front, flankGrant's force of about 120,000 then could have been assailed front, flank and rear by 60,000 men under the two choicest generals of the Confederate army. This plan, unfortunately, was rejected by the President, and immediately thereafternt to General Whiting an order saying that General Lee was pressed very hard by Grant, and needed all the reinforcements which could be forwarded to him to save Richwas very decided in capturing 6,000 prisoners and in shutting Butler up, as General Grant said, in Howlett's Neck, like a fly in a bottle. On the morning of the 17t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
, after a desperate struggle, distinguished by many acts of individual heroism. Lieutenant G. M. Turner, though previously wounded on the skirmish line, joined in the charge, and was shot down in the act of saving the life of a comrade. Lieutenant W. D. Grant took a regimental flag from the hands of its bearer, and was prostrated by mortal wounds immediately after delivering it to me. Sergeant George James is reported to have taken another, and fell shortly after. Captain G. C. Rice was overp. Blois, John R. Dillon; Sergeants F. Ripon Sweat, Bayard J. McIntosh, Chas. R. Maxwell, M. McLean, C. J. Sweat, Albert Folker. Died Since of their Wounds—Company A: Lieutenant Fred A. Tupper; Private B. Green. Company B: Lieutenants George D. Smith, Wm. D. Grant; Sergeant E. C. Wade; Privates Percy Elliott, F. Kreeger, F. N. Guerard. Company C: Lieutenant Eugene T. Blois. The balance of the command were either captured unhurt after the fight, or escaped and were present at the surrender
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ath, wounding or capture. It was about the 7th of May, 1864, that the brigade, after a season of recreation in the vicinity of Hanover and Taylorsville, received orders to rejoin the army at the Wilderness, near Spotsylvania Court House. General Grant was now in command on the other side. The regiment had a part in the battle of the Wilderness. Brigadier-General Johnston joined his command on the Rappahannock just before the battle of Mine Run, and participated in that fight, although rded immediately above. In the valley campaign, the brigade was transferred to Ramseur's division. At his death, General John Pegram succeeded to the command of the division. Almost simultaneous with the transfer of Sheridan from the valley to Grant's line near Petersburg, Early's command returned to the aid of Lee, at least the greater part of it. Picket duty on Hatcher's Run, during the greater part of the winter, was onerous and severe. The 23rd took an active part in the fight at Hat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
train; First Lieutenant, James Lindsay; Second Lieutenant, William M. Sterret; Third Lieutenant, William N. Wilson. This company holds undisputed the unique position of having probably the first and the last man killed on Virginia soil. Lieutenant Robert McChesney was the first, being bushwhacked in West Virginia, and James H. Wilson and Samuel B. Walker were, killed at Appomattox on the 9th of April, 1865, several hours after the terms of capitulation had been signed by Generals Lee and Grant. The following is a list of the dead and living who at any time during the war served in the company: William Adams, James Y. Anderson, John Y. Anderson, Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, H. W. Bagley, D. S. Black, William Black, A. M. Brown, Charles B. Buchanan, William Brownlee, Jno. Brownlee, S. Balser, James Breedlove, Thomas Chittum, John Chittum, Z. J. Culton, Joseph Culton, John Campbell, William Davis, L. P. Davis, David Dice, George W. Dice, John Dice, Archi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
n of Mr. Secretary Corwin—an echo of the British system of coinage, not offensively, but simply ignoring it—he formulated a measure regulating the coinage, which passed the Senate unanimously, without debate, precisely as he wrote it and upon his sole ipse dixit. Next, but after some delay, this identical measure passed the House of Representatives and became a law in February, 1853—to remain the law of the land without question or cavil from Presidents Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln, Johnson and Grant. Such was his power in the United States Senate in a period of fierce party strife on a great organic and economic question, opposing, as he did then, the Secretary's recommendation. I have heard or read this coinage debate from 1874, when it began, till now, over twenty years of parliamentary struggle, and if I were called upon to name a document which best expounds the true principles of finance and statesmanship on this difficult subject, and in a perfectly unanswerable manner, free fr<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
mond (5,000 under Ransom) & General Lee's army, I w'd attack Butler's 30,000 men (who had been successful in the afternoon of the 13th in taking the outer line of defences) capture or destroy them by 12th on the 15th. I would then move to attack Grant on his left flank & rear, while Lee attacked him in front, & I felt sure of defeating Grant & probably open the way to Washington where we might dictate Peace! The Pres't being sick & very tired, Col. Stevens could not see him, but delivered Grant & probably open the way to Washington where we might dictate Peace! The Pres't being sick & very tired, Col. Stevens could not see him, but delivered my message to General Bragg with my request that the necessary order sh'd be issued at once, but he refused to do it, although mil'y adviser of the Pres't, without the orders of the latter & as he w'd not disturb him (!) he came to confer with me at D's b. where he arrived at about 6 h. A. M. After discussing my plan, which he agreed was the only one which might save Richard & the Conf'cy, he still refused to issue the necessary orders. I then said to him Bragg circumstances have thrown the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
concering the operations of the 18th of June, 1864, and of the two days preceding that day. General Grant, in his report, says that he ordered General G. W. Smith to advance, and for three days findnt himself to the front. This is all he says; General B. F. Butler, who had been bottled up, as Grant said, across the Appomattox, a stone's throw from a part of this battlefield, and who crossed it to see Grant, retaliated the bottling up assertion by alleging that Grant was drunk on this occasion. Some time ago a new element to me, was introduced into our Confederate version, and I wrote tGrant was drunk on this occasion. Some time ago a new element to me, was introduced into our Confederate version, and I wrote to General Hagood the accompanying version, so as to recall his attention to the facts. In reply he wrote me he was glad to get it; that no report of the same had ever before reached him. Colonel RioHagood's brigade. Hagood's brigade had been on the north side of the James river, confronting Grant's army, from before the battle of Cold Harbor, on the 3d of June, along down the Chickahominy, M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ached August 1st. The division went into winter quarters at Orange Court House, and the regiment did picket duty on the Rapidan. On the 7th of February, during General Scales' absence, Colonel Hoke commanded the brigade against an advance of the enemy on the brigade picket line at Barnett's Ford on the Rapidan, and it maintained its position until the enemy retired. After the death of Pender at Gettysburg, Wilcox became division commander. On the morning of May 4th, the enemy under General Grant, crossed the Rapidan at Ely's and Germanna Fords. Two corps of Lee's army moved to oppose him, Ewell's by the turnpike and Hill's by the plank road. As soon as the Confederate forces reached the enemy, a strong attack was made on Ewell, who repulsed them, but soon they returned, massing a heavy force against Hill. Heth's and Wilcox's divisions met every assault and successfully resisted them, but the enemy continued to make attacks until nightfall. Next morning, as Longstreet was rel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ays be found in the fore-front of the fighting. The Wilderness. General Lee, having received information that General Grant had commenced the passage of the Rapidan on the night of the 3rd of May, 1864, broke up his cantonments on the 4th, aia Courthouse. On the 10th Heth's and Anderson's divisions, commanded by Early, had a serious conflict with a portion of Grant's army, which was attempting to flank General Lee by what was called the Po River road. In this engagement the 44th suffments in which its brigade took part, from Spotsylvania Court House to Petersburg, constantly skirmishing and fighting as Grant continued his march on Lee's flank. On the 3d of June, 1864, it was heavily engaged with the enemy near Gaines' Mill. Ithe South, whence he drew his men and supplies. On the 18th of August, 1864, General G. K. Warren, with the 5th corps of Grant's army and Kautz's division of cavalry, occupied the line of the Weldon road at a point six miles from Petersburg. An at